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The Night Wire: and Other Tales of Weird Media

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A mysterious radio signal reports cosmic doom from an otherworldly location. Photography and X-ray evidence suggests there may be some truth to a sculptor’s claim that he has created a god. A spectral projection sows terror amid the flickering light of the cinema. From the whispering wires of the telegraph and ghostly images of the daguerreotype to the disembodied voices o A mysterious radio signal reports cosmic doom from an otherworldly location. Photography and X-ray evidence suggests there may be some truth to a sculptor’s claim that he has created a god. A spectral projection sows terror amid the flickering light of the cinema. From the whispering wires of the telegraph and ghostly images of the daguerreotype to the disembodied voices of the phonograph and radio, the new technologies of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries gave their users miraculous new powers – and new nightmares. After all, if Graham Bell’s magical device could connect us with loved ones a half a world away, what was to stop it from reaching out and touching the dead – or something worse? Tracing this fiction of fear from the 1890s to the 1950s, this new collection brings together the best tales of haunted or uncanny media from classic – and unjustly neglected – writers of the supernatural.


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A mysterious radio signal reports cosmic doom from an otherworldly location. Photography and X-ray evidence suggests there may be some truth to a sculptor’s claim that he has created a god. A spectral projection sows terror amid the flickering light of the cinema. From the whispering wires of the telegraph and ghostly images of the daguerreotype to the disembodied voices o A mysterious radio signal reports cosmic doom from an otherworldly location. Photography and X-ray evidence suggests there may be some truth to a sculptor’s claim that he has created a god. A spectral projection sows terror amid the flickering light of the cinema. From the whispering wires of the telegraph and ghostly images of the daguerreotype to the disembodied voices of the phonograph and radio, the new technologies of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries gave their users miraculous new powers – and new nightmares. After all, if Graham Bell’s magical device could connect us with loved ones a half a world away, what was to stop it from reaching out and touching the dead – or something worse? Tracing this fiction of fear from the 1890s to the 1950s, this new collection brings together the best tales of haunted or uncanny media from classic – and unjustly neglected – writers of the supernatural.

32 review for The Night Wire: and Other Tales of Weird Media

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cheshire Cat

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

  3. 5 out of 5

    Abbie Leonard

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nadia Bailey

  5. 5 out of 5

    Roland Squire

  6. 5 out of 5

    Winry Weiss

  7. 4 out of 5

    Saffron Moon

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tristan

  9. 5 out of 5

    Robyn Higgins

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett

  11. 4 out of 5

    kelsey.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marily

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Stewart

  14. 5 out of 5

    Norman

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tim Dans

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ned Netherwood

  17. 4 out of 5

    Allison

  18. 5 out of 5

    Juliet Brown

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marchen

  20. 5 out of 5

    Madeline Rinaldi

  21. 4 out of 5

    [on hiatus] The rockabilly werewolf from Mars

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lychee

  24. 4 out of 5

    Belinda

  25. 5 out of 5

    Siobhain (whatyoutolkienabout)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Terra

  27. 5 out of 5

    Horace Derwent

  28. 5 out of 5

    An

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nick Vallina

  31. 4 out of 5

    Matilda

  32. 5 out of 5

    Heather Pacella

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