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Daughters of Paris

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Paris 1930s Colette – daughter of a wealthy Parisian. No-one expects her to amount to anything other than socialite wife. But there’s more to Colette than meets the eye… Fleur – daughter of a maid in Colette’s household. Her life will not be one of service! She wants an education, to travel and become something more… The two young girls see in each other what no-one else can: Paris 1930s Colette – daughter of a wealthy Parisian. No-one expects her to amount to anything other than socialite wife. But there’s more to Colette than meets the eye… Fleur – daughter of a maid in Colette’s household. Her life will not be one of service! She wants an education, to travel and become something more… The two young girls see in each other what no-one else can: intelligence, strength and courage. They form a forbidden friendship. They become secret sisters. But as the Nazis occupy their beloved Paris, the bond between them is severely tested. One fights with the resistance, the other protects her family at all costs. Soon they find themselves embroiled in espionage, murder and treason, risking everything to save those they love, their people and their country. Will their friendship survive the ultimate betrayal?


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Paris 1930s Colette – daughter of a wealthy Parisian. No-one expects her to amount to anything other than socialite wife. But there’s more to Colette than meets the eye… Fleur – daughter of a maid in Colette’s household. Her life will not be one of service! She wants an education, to travel and become something more… The two young girls see in each other what no-one else can: Paris 1930s Colette – daughter of a wealthy Parisian. No-one expects her to amount to anything other than socialite wife. But there’s more to Colette than meets the eye… Fleur – daughter of a maid in Colette’s household. Her life will not be one of service! She wants an education, to travel and become something more… The two young girls see in each other what no-one else can: intelligence, strength and courage. They form a forbidden friendship. They become secret sisters. But as the Nazis occupy their beloved Paris, the bond between them is severely tested. One fights with the resistance, the other protects her family at all costs. Soon they find themselves embroiled in espionage, murder and treason, risking everything to save those they love, their people and their country. Will their friendship survive the ultimate betrayal?

30 review for Daughters of Paris

  1. 4 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    Paris, 1930s, Colette - daughter of a wealthy Parisian. No-one expects her to amount to anything other than the socialite wife. But there's more to Colette than meets the eye. Fleur - daughter of a maid in Colette's household. Her life will not be one of service! She wants an education, to travel and become something more.... The two young girls see in each other what no-one else can: intelligence, strength and courage. They form a forbidden friendship. They become secret sisters. But as the Nazi Paris, 1930s, Colette - daughter of a wealthy Parisian. No-one expects her to amount to anything other than the socialite wife. But there's more to Colette than meets the eye. Fleur - daughter of a maid in Colette's household. Her life will not be one of service! She wants an education, to travel and become something more.... The two young girls see in each other what no-one else can: intelligence, strength and courage. They form a forbidden friendship. They become secret sisters. But as the Nazis occupy their beloved Paris, the bond between them is severely tested. One fights with the resistance, the other protects her family at all costs. This is a story about true friendship, love, bravery, loyalty, strength and resilience. Colette and Fleur grew up together but from very different backgrounds. Colette is to England and the girls loose touch. But as the war begins, Colette returns to Paris. This is a well written and researched novel. I did prefer Fleur's character, Colette took a little more time to warm to. I did enjoy learning more about the resistance movement. I would like to thank #NetGalley #HarperCollinsUK #OneMoreChapter and the author #ElisabethHobbes for my ARC of #DaughtersOfParis in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karren Sandercock

    Colette Nadon and Fleur Bonnivard, grow up together in 1930’s Paris, they play games, explore their surroundings and get dirty. Despite Colette’s father Louis being a wealthy businessman, orphaned Fleur’s Aunt Agnes is the Nadon’s cook and they come from different backgrounds. The girls promise to be best friends forever and they become secret sisters. Colette’s mother Delphine is a snob, she wants her daughter to marry well and establish her place in Parisian society. As time goes on Delphine i Colette Nadon and Fleur Bonnivard, grow up together in 1930’s Paris, they play games, explore their surroundings and get dirty. Despite Colette’s father Louis being a wealthy businessman, orphaned Fleur’s Aunt Agnes is the Nadon’s cook and they come from different backgrounds. The girls promise to be best friends forever and they become secret sisters. Colette’s mother Delphine is a snob, she wants her daughter to marry well and establish her place in Parisian society. As time goes on Delphine introduces her daughter to the right people, Colette turns into a party girl, and she travels and sees less of Fleur. At first Fleur is hurt, but she knows she and Colette come from different circumstances, and she doesn’t want her Aunt to lose her job.. Fleur loves to read and finds work in a bookshop, she hangs out at Café Morlaix and admires the handsome waiter Sebastien. When the Germans easily take Paris, Colette and Fleur are stunned, scared and don’t know what the future holds. Colette’s posh friends own a hotel, German soldiers move in, and Fleur’s shocked Colette would want to mix with collaborators. Fleur is one of the Parisians who fight back, carrying out small acts of defiance, and eventually she becomes involved with the resistance. Colette isn’t as self-cantered as everyone believes, she notices the food shortages, arguments breaking out in the long ration lines, hungry children, and German soldiers harassing young women not interested in their advances. Soon both women form an alliance, Fleur realizes she has judged Colette harshly, slowly they rebuild their friendship and both take risks. With their hearts on the line, they both become involved in the fight to free France, espionage, helping the resistance, keeping secrets, and people hiding from the Germans, and if caught the punishment is torture, and they could be shot! I received a copy of Daughters of Paris by Elisabeth Hobbes from NetGalley and HarperCollins UK, One More Chapter in exchange for an unbiased review. I have read the authors previous book The Secret Agent and her latest novel is outstanding. Told from the points of view of two young women, it’s full of relevant information and facts about the difficult war years in France, it emphasizes how women needed friendship, support and a confidant during the time to deal with the hardship and cope with the uncertainty of the war, losing loved ones, and not knowing when the suffering would end? Five stars from me and I highly recommend reading this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alayne Emmett

    I enjoyed this book from page one until the end. Set during war-time in France and what happens to the two women who are friends during this terrible and frightening times. This book was well written and the author researched it well. Highly recommended. My thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for giving me the opportunity to read this book in return for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Daughters of Paris by Elisabeth Hobbes is a great WWII-era historical fiction that has it all: mystery, suspense, history, strong female characters, and kept me engaged throughout. I really enjoyed this book that presented such strong lead female characters. The fundamental concepts of loyalty, friendship, sacrifice, moral decisions, and forgiveness are present throughout. Fleur and Collette are excellent characters. The bravery, strength, and courage exhibited was impressive. The high stakes in Daughters of Paris by Elisabeth Hobbes is a great WWII-era historical fiction that has it all: mystery, suspense, history, strong female characters, and kept me engaged throughout. I really enjoyed this book that presented such strong lead female characters. The fundamental concepts of loyalty, friendship, sacrifice, moral decisions, and forgiveness are present throughout. Fleur and Collette are excellent characters. The bravery, strength, and courage exhibited was impressive. The high stakes intrigue and risks taken during the war, the occupation, and against the enemy in Paris was engaging and kept my interest. The threads of romance added another element to the narrative that continued to add to the complexity. I also enjoyed the ending. 5/5 stars Thank you NG and One More Chapter/ Harper Collins UK or this wonderful arc and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon, Instagram, and B&N accounts upon publication on 8/5/22.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Review to follow for blog tour

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Hupe

    “Life is going to get hard, Fleur. Not everyone is strong enough to bear that and war changes people. Some for the worst, and some for the better. I believe you are one of the strong ones.” DAUGHTERS OF PARIS Thank you, Elisabeth Hobbes, NetGalley, and HarperCollinsUk for the opportunity to read this book! It will release on August 5th, 2022. I absolutely adored Elisabeth Hobbes’s previous novel, Daughter of the Sea. While I am really particular about World War II novels, I just had to pick up Daug “Life is going to get hard, Fleur. Not everyone is strong enough to bear that and war changes people. Some for the worst, and some for the better. I believe you are one of the strong ones.” DAUGHTERS OF PARIS Thank you, Elisabeth Hobbes, NetGalley, and HarperCollinsUk for the opportunity to read this book! It will release on August 5th, 2022. I absolutely adored Elisabeth Hobbes’s previous novel, Daughter of the Sea. While I am really particular about World War II novels, I just had to pick up Daughters of Paris. This one begins before the German invasion of France with two girls, Colette and Fleur becoming best friends but are from two totally different backgrounds. Colette comes from a wealthy family, with a doting father but a disconnected mother. Fleur’s parents have passed away and now she lives with her aunt who is the housekeeper for Colette’s family. But then the war comes to France and their lives change. Colette and Fleur have grown apart but now they have to band together to survive. It turns out that they have it easier than others. Fleur is not willing to go down without a fight and joins the Resistance, but it means that their lives will be filled with danger. So in terms of World War II novels, it isn’t the best. This book fell prey to romancing the war. However, I did absolutely love the aspects of friendship and courage. At first, I could not stand Colette and pretty much all of the characters except for Fleur. But the one thing that Elisabeth Hobbes does so well is character development. I won’t lie, Colette and Sebastian’s relationship didn’t affect me. However, I was so invested in Laurent and Fleur’s relationship. They were both so dedicated to helping others and France. That came first and they made smart decisions, unlike Colette and Sebastian. But she can definitely write a scene. I could picture myself in Paris. I was completely immersed and felt every emotion. I can’t lie the Resistance movement within Paris is what interested me the most. I plan to look more into it as I studied Jewish Forest Camps in college. To make a difference, all it takes is one person. Like this book, every person is a link in a chain.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    Collette Nadon is the daughter of well-to-do parents. Her father, Louis, pampers her but her mother, Delphine, is distant and selfish, seems to drink a lot and only wants Collette to make a good marriage. Fleur is an orphan being raised by the Nadon's housekeeper. As children Collette and Fleur are close but as they get older Collette becomes more of a party girl and Fleur is more serious, wants to get an education and travel the world. Then the war starts and the Germans are in Paris. It doesn' Collette Nadon is the daughter of well-to-do parents. Her father, Louis, pampers her but her mother, Delphine, is distant and selfish, seems to drink a lot and only wants Collette to make a good marriage. Fleur is an orphan being raised by the Nadon's housekeeper. As children Collette and Fleur are close but as they get older Collette becomes more of a party girl and Fleur is more serious, wants to get an education and travel the world. Then the war starts and the Germans are in Paris. It doesn't seem like their lives change very much. Collette hangs out at a hotel with her friends, Sophie and Josette. All she wants to do is dance and she doesn't care if she is dancing with Germans. I found Collette to have a good heart and even though she hid a Jewish person in their "secret garden" I don't think she really understood the danger she put everyone in and is actually very shallow. Fleur takes over the bookstore she worked in and starts working with the resistance but still made sacrifices to her happiness for Collette. Overall I liked the book, it was easy to read but I don't think the horrors of Paris during the war are really depicted. They mentioned having to stand in long lines for food but they never really seemed hungry. There wasn't a fear of the German soldiers, most of the time they seemed darned amiable. What Fleur did in the resistance was dangerous but you couldn't tell that from this book. When she had a mission she just said she was going to work and it was never said what her actual purpose was. The most exciting part for me was the romance between Fleur and Laurent. Then the ending was a big turnaround for Delphine and then we jump to June of 1944, then to August of 1945 and then 1994. There were so many questions I felt were unanswered like what happened to the books in the garden? Why didn't they ever go get the strawberries out of there and eat them? I would probably recommend this book but as far as historical fiction of Paris during the war I found it lacking. If you read it as a book about a friendship it makes more sense. I would like to thank Netgalley and Harper Collins UK One More Chapter for providing me with a copy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tanya R

    In the beginning of the story Fluer, the maid's niece, and Collette, the daughter of the house, were great friends and I couldn't way to see how their story would progress through the years. Unfortunately, as they grow older, they grow apart, but are later forced back together due to circumstances. This WW2 Historical Fiction novel was a good story but it went in a different direction than I had hoped. Thank you to #RachelsRandomResources for having me on this Book Tour. All opinions expressed are In the beginning of the story Fluer, the maid's niece, and Collette, the daughter of the house, were great friends and I couldn't way to see how their story would progress through the years. Unfortunately, as they grow older, they grow apart, but are later forced back together due to circumstances. This WW2 Historical Fiction novel was a good story but it went in a different direction than I had hoped. Thank you to #RachelsRandomResources for having me on this Book Tour. All opinions expressed are my own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    theliterateleprechaun

    Have you ever had a secret sister? A BFF that lived as much at your place as her own home? Colette Nadon and Fleur Bonnivard are ‘soeurs secrètes’ because, although they’re bookends of Parisienne society, they grew up together in the same house. Fleur’s guardian, Tante Agnes, is the Nadon family’s housekeeper. The author sets the scene with such vivid detail and wonderful characters that I was immediately pulled into the story. I identified more with Fleur and felt like I was Colette’s BFF as I r Have you ever had a secret sister? A BFF that lived as much at your place as her own home? Colette Nadon and Fleur Bonnivard are ‘soeurs secrètes’ because, although they’re bookends of Parisienne society, they grew up together in the same house. Fleur’s guardian, Tante Agnes, is the Nadon family’s housekeeper. The author sets the scene with such vivid detail and wonderful characters that I was immediately pulled into the story. I identified more with Fleur and felt like I was Colette’s BFF as I read. I watched as the girls grew up and society’s ideals forced them to part ways. The author’s journey of female friendship and support was incredible. As the girls matured and war broke out, the story took a different tone and segwayed into an exploration of the differing attitudes of French women living under German rule. I read about some who enthusiastically resisted, some who actively collaborated and many who attempted to maintain a path of neutrality between the two extremes in an effort to survive. How would you fare if you lived in Paris between 1944 - 2012? ❗ Women didn’t get the right to vote until the summer of 1944 ❗ Women weren’t allowed to work outside the home without their husband’s consent until 1965 ❗ Wearing pants/trousers was technically illegal until 2012 What I learned was that with the men gone to fight war, the new independence and opportunities were a heavy load on the women. I was shocked to discover that some “would rather face their end on their own terms than wait for it to trap them unawares.” I saw many similarities between the attitudes portrayed in this story and attitudes we’ve seen develop since the pandemic. You’ll have to read this character-focused in depth examination of Parisienne wartime society and see how it affected the sisterly bond between the girls. I was gifted this advance copy by Elisabeth Hobbes, Harper Collins UK, One More Chapter, and NetGalley and was under no obligation to provide a review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Wendy(Wendyreadsbooks) Robey

    A beautiful story of the friendships of women in such a hard time in history. I loved the relationship between Colette and Fleur - such different backgrounds and shared childhood but really brought together in the terrible years of war. The strength found in eachother was wonderful to read about and the development of Colette from selfish and shallow teenager to calm and caring adult was brilliant to see - spending time with Fleur was certainly a good influence on her. The horrors of occupied Pa A beautiful story of the friendships of women in such a hard time in history. I loved the relationship between Colette and Fleur - such different backgrounds and shared childhood but really brought together in the terrible years of war. The strength found in eachother was wonderful to read about and the development of Colette from selfish and shallow teenager to calm and caring adult was brilliant to see - spending time with Fleur was certainly a good influence on her. The horrors of occupied Paris are not ignored in this charming story but covered in such a empathetic way as to share this important part of history.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Merissa (Archaeolibrarian)

    DAUGHTERS OF PARIS is a story of friendship between two girls of different classes at a difficult time - the German occupation of France during WWII. Colette is the socialite - not expected to do anything but marry into money and be beautiful. Fleur is the niece of the housekeeper. Their lives change as they grow up and apart, with Colette leaving for a sojourn to England. By the time she returns to Paris, they have changed in so many ways, that their friendship seems to be a thing of the past. B DAUGHTERS OF PARIS is a story of friendship between two girls of different classes at a difficult time - the German occupation of France during WWII. Colette is the socialite - not expected to do anything but marry into money and be beautiful. Fleur is the niece of the housekeeper. Their lives change as they grow up and apart, with Colette leaving for a sojourn to England. By the time she returns to Paris, they have changed in so many ways, that their friendship seems to be a thing of the past. But then Paris is declared an open city with curfews, ration books, and checkpoints. Being so different, how will the two of them cope? I was thoroughly immersed in their story. If you read it as a war story then I think you may be slightly disappointed as the conditions and atrocities of war aren't mentioned in much detail. There is always an edge to the writing though, giving the impression of nerves and danger around every corner. What this story is, is about friendship in adversity. It's about standing up for what you think is right, even if it could be - and is - dangerous. It's about realising the world is filled with grey, not just black and white. I was left with questions at the end - what happened to Josette? Michal? Monsieur Ramper? I really wish I had found out, but then I guess I'm in the same position so many were by the end of the war - not knowing where people were or if they were still alive. A story of friendship first and foremost, with different threads of love woven through it. This was a story I lost myself in and thoroughly enjoyed every word. Highly recommended by me. ** same worded review will appear elsewhere ** * A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and the comments here are my honest opinion. * Merissa Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Boyd

    Elisabeth Hobbes’ Daughters of Paris is a story of intrigue, romance, and redemption. I found it to be an enjoyable if somewhat predictable read till the end of the novel, where things took a turn for the worse. While playing in the yard of the high-end Parisian apartment building in which they live, best friends Fleur and Colette make a delightful discovery: There is a gate, hidden behind an overgrowth of vines and shrubberies. It takes all they have to push the door open and squeeze through but Elisabeth Hobbes’ Daughters of Paris is a story of intrigue, romance, and redemption. I found it to be an enjoyable if somewhat predictable read till the end of the novel, where things took a turn for the worse. While playing in the yard of the high-end Parisian apartment building in which they live, best friends Fleur and Colette make a delightful discovery: There is a gate, hidden behind an overgrowth of vines and shrubberies. It takes all they have to push the door open and squeeze through but it is worth the effort – beyond that barrier is a small, hidden walled garden with a dilapidated greenhouse full of strawberries. The girls eat their fill and swear to keep the place a secret. Initially, it is one of many secrets they keep between them, but as they age it isn’t long before they are keeping secrets from each other as well. Colette, the daughter of a wealthy manufacturer, has a life filled with dance clubs, risque friends, endless nights out, and dashing beaus. Fleur, the orphaned niece of the housekeeper, is far more studious. Her friends are students and fellow book enthusiasts who congregate in cafés to discuss politics and reform. Where once Colette and Fleur spent all day talking to each other, their adult selves find they have nothing to say to one another. And then the unthinkable happens and France is occupied. German soldiers sit at the café tables where Fleur and her friends used to meet. The clubs Colette frequented are now the gathering places of Nazi officers. As their nation is slowly suffocated by the enemy, Fleur and Colette once more find they have something in common – a deep desire to see France free from the fascists who have taken it over. See the rest of my review at https://allaboutromance.com/book-revi...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Judy Christiana

    This story takes place 1930 through 1945. At its core, it is a tale of perhaps an unlikely friendship of two very different women. One is from a wealthy household, Colette, and the other, Fleur, is an orphan living with her aunt who is the maid of that household and she is expected to help in the work. Colette is spoiled not having to earn anything she receives, while Fleur works for and appreciates every thing in her life. Due to living in the same house and being close in age, they do become f This story takes place 1930 through 1945. At its core, it is a tale of perhaps an unlikely friendship of two very different women. One is from a wealthy household, Colette, and the other, Fleur, is an orphan living with her aunt who is the maid of that household and she is expected to help in the work. Colette is spoiled not having to earn anything she receives, while Fleur works for and appreciates every thing in her life. Due to living in the same house and being close in age, they do become friends and that is what I think this book is about, the bond of friendship. Sometimes regardless of backgrounds, people make the family they desire. This story is very emotional since it has WWII in the background and life in occupied Paris. I was constantly wondering if I could be as brave as these two women. Definitely a well written, thought provoking book. Everyone should read this, if only to remind ourselves how very fortunate we are for the brave people that fought, how different our lives would be if they had not been successful, and to be grateful for the cherished friends in our lives. Thank you to HarperCollins UK, One More Chapter and NetGalley for giving me the pleasure of reading the advance reader copy, with no obligation to write a review. My review is written freely as a hobby, and is totally my own opinion, not influenced by receiving the ARC.

  14. 5 out of 5

    sathvika

    4/5 for Daughters of Paris by Elisabeth Hobbes Fleur and Colette, the main characters in the book, blew my mind away. They are so loving and brave, yet so flawed in character in manner. Perhaps, that is why they feel so relatable and real. I really enjoyed how not all the thoughts and overall personalities of the girls are given right away. Much of who they really are as people is slowly revealed as the story progress. This made the read a whole lot more interesting because I was constantly thirs 4/5 for Daughters of Paris by Elisabeth Hobbes Fleur and Colette, the main characters in the book, blew my mind away. They are so loving and brave, yet so flawed in character in manner. Perhaps, that is why they feel so relatable and real. I really enjoyed how not all the thoughts and overall personalities of the girls are given right away. Much of who they really are as people is slowly revealed as the story progress. This made the read a whole lot more interesting because I was constantly thirsting for new information. Of course, the plot and time period the book is set in, World War Two makes everything even more nail-biting. Nazi Paris is already a fascinating place as it was gilded glamour at the time. Exploring the time with the perspectives of both a rich young woman and poorer one give two every unique but clashing accounts that bring the perfect amount of "spice" to the book. This was also a new author for me, but her writing style, flow and character portrayal was so so good. I would totally recommend this to all WW2 geeks, historical fiction lovers, and women's fiction queens. Thank you to NetGalley, HarperCollins, and Elisabeth Hobbes for this advanced copy. All opinions are my own.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tara Alemany

    This story was not a winner for me. There was very little to like about most of the characters, and I found it very hard to finish the book. The primary relationship between childhood friends Fleur and Collette was unbalanced when they were children since Fleur was the niece of the housekeeper, while Colette was the daughter of the homeowners. But it became painfully moreso as Colette grew up to be a self-centered, inconsiderate woman. And Fleur was her codependent partner, always making excuses This story was not a winner for me. There was very little to like about most of the characters, and I found it very hard to finish the book. The primary relationship between childhood friends Fleur and Collette was unbalanced when they were children since Fleur was the niece of the housekeeper, while Colette was the daughter of the homeowners. But it became painfully moreso as Colette grew up to be a self-centered, inconsiderate woman. And Fleur was her codependent partner, always making excuses for Colette and putting Colette's happiness before her own. While it was good to see Colette mature in the latter half of the book, it was still often at the expense of Fleur's happiness. And Fleur just kept enabling her! I do appreciate the opportunity Elisabeth Hobbes, One More Chapter and NetGalley provided by offering me an advance review copy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicola

    Daughters of Paris follows two women who grow up in the same house. One is considered rich and the other is the relative of the housekeeper. I liked the historical aspect of this story. The relationship between the two main characters wasn’t one I overly liked. Definitely a book you should pick up and read if you are a fan of historical fiction. Many thanks to NetGalley, the publisher and author for the opportunity to read this book for my honest review. All opinions and thoughts expressed are my Daughters of Paris follows two women who grow up in the same house. One is considered rich and the other is the relative of the housekeeper. I liked the historical aspect of this story. The relationship between the two main characters wasn’t one I overly liked. Definitely a book you should pick up and read if you are a fan of historical fiction. Many thanks to NetGalley, the publisher and author for the opportunity to read this book for my honest review. All opinions and thoughts expressed are my own

  17. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    Collette and Fleur are best friends growing up together. Life separates them and then the war starts. Fleur starts doing her part in the fight against the Germans. Collette finds love where she least expects it. It’s a nice love story set against the backdrop of the war. It’s nice to see the girls grow and find their way in life. Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the early copy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Colette and Fleur became best friends as children, although they were at different stations in life (Colette as the daughter of the house and Fleur as the niece of the housekeeper). As they grew up, they also grew apart, and then World War II began. The two women both resist German occupation in different ways, coming to understand that they have to fight for their country to protect themselves and their way of life. The war brings the two women back together in ways they never would have expect Colette and Fleur became best friends as children, although they were at different stations in life (Colette as the daughter of the house and Fleur as the niece of the housekeeper). As they grew up, they also grew apart, and then World War II began. The two women both resist German occupation in different ways, coming to understand that they have to fight for their country to protect themselves and their way of life. The war brings the two women back together in ways they never would have expected. I was rather disappointed in this book. It felt very superficial, as if the author hadn’t done enough research about Paris during the Second World War. While I realize the author’s goal was to focus on the tie between these two women during wartime, I don’t think the author went deep enough into the experiences of Parisians for this book to be successful. For example, while there was discussion about the rationing and queuing early on in the book, it’s as if that was just forgotten as the years of war went on—even though, in reality, the lack of food (and coal for the stoves, something that is never mentioned) just got worse. Additionally, beyond the first couple years of the war, there is little mention of the Germans and the terror the citizens of Paris experienced at their hands. Fleur gets involved in the Resistance and her activities are briefly mentioned, although to no depth, but she rarely seems concerned that she’ll get caught. Also, after the Allies land at Normandy, Fleur and Colette act as if nothing bad will ever happen to them again—when in reality, we know that the Allied landing actually made the Germans even more dangerous than they were when they could pretend they were still winning the war. In fact, as the Allies came closer to Paris following the Normandy invasion, the Germans cracked down even harder on those in the Resistance, but Fleur seems unaffected by that occurrence. While I didn’t detest this book—overall, I liked the idea of it and I also appreciated the characters, both their strengths and their foibles—I also didn’t find it to be an impressive addition to the World War II historical fiction about Paris and the Resistance. There are much better books out there to describe the experiences of Parisians during the Second World War. I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley for review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shanon Yeo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It's been a while since I cried at a book! Daughters of Paris follows a high society girl, Colette, and her housekeepers niece, Fleur from a young age through the trials and tribulations that occurred as a result of WW2. As young girls sharing secrets, thoughts, and friendships they become 'Secret Sisters', until Colette became of age and started spending time with other girls like herself, and also attending parties in her mothers, Delphine, salon. On the off chance that Fleur was allowed to att It's been a while since I cried at a book! Daughters of Paris follows a high society girl, Colette, and her housekeepers niece, Fleur from a young age through the trials and tribulations that occurred as a result of WW2. As young girls sharing secrets, thoughts, and friendships they become 'Secret Sisters', until Colette became of age and started spending time with other girls like herself, and also attending parties in her mothers, Delphine, salon. On the off chance that Fleur was allowed to attend such a party, Colette betrayed their 'Secret Sisters' bond by taking a young man, Gunther, to their secret garden which they discovered when they were younger. Not long after this, Colette is sent to England - for reasons we find out later (pregnancy). As war starts to rear its ugly head, Colette's parents request Colette to journey back to Paris. As both Fleur and Colette start to reconnect, the war starts becoming more real to the both of them. On the first night that Paris was bombed, Agnes, Fleur's aunt and housekeeper to Colette's family, sadly takes her own life. This was an especially important point in the book for me, as Fleur was starting to make decisions about her life which would have been quite bold, such as becoming the owner of the bookshop where she used to work a couple of days a week, becoming part of the Resistance, then also the heartbreak of falling in love with someone who doesn't love her back. All of this was being kept a secret from Colette. But Colette had many secrets of her own. As the book moves on, we follow how Colette and Fleur face decisions of whether to do what was right, or something that could end up having them killed. As much as I despised Colette in the beginning and found her to be a frightfully, awful rich girl, she turned out to be such as endearing character, that brought out so much overall from Fleur and other characters too. The epilogue was bittersweet as it showed life way after the war, and highlighted the sacrifices and journey they have both been through since childhood.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    Daughters of Paris is many things: sobering, sad, frightening, heartbreaking, and heartwarming and inspirational at the same time. It feels so authentic, just as you would imagine life might have been for ordinary, normal people living in Paris who thought their lives and futures were set. Who discovered things were not set when the Germans occupied their beautiful city. These ordinary people learned things about themselves and those around them, good things and bad things. Unexpected selflessne Daughters of Paris is many things: sobering, sad, frightening, heartbreaking, and heartwarming and inspirational at the same time. It feels so authentic, just as you would imagine life might have been for ordinary, normal people living in Paris who thought their lives and futures were set. Who discovered things were not set when the Germans occupied their beautiful city. These ordinary people learned things about themselves and those around them, good things and bad things. Unexpected selflessness and bravery, sometimes not-so-unexpected selfishness and cowardice. Fleur and Colette are two of those ordinary people. Different stations in life – Colette is the daughter of the house, used to pretty things and getting her way while Fleur is the orphan niece of the housekeeper, thoughtful, always feeling on the outside looking in – but Colette and Fleur have been best friends since they were children. They have pledged to be friends forever, but then Colette mysteriously goes away for a year and things change. She returns to Paris and picks up her exciting life. Fleur has developed interests and a life of her own. Each feels the other ignored her during Colette’s absence and it doesn’t look like they will ever be close again. But then war comes. The occupation of Paris. The death of Fleur’s aunt. The seizure of Colette’s father’s business by the Germans. Fear and deprivation become the norm. Will the French government stand up to the Germans and resist? Will things ever be like they once were? Daughters of Paris is a fascinating story, a little look at life for a varied handful of Parisians and the different ways in which they responded and adapted to this new way of life. Some volunteered to fight and went away. Some resisted behind the scenes. Some pretended nothing was happening. And some decided making friends with the occupiers was the best method of survival. Both Fleur and Colette responded as their conscience, need and inner strength dictated. They came together, pulled apart, did what they could to just hang on. Thanks to Harper Collins One More Chapter UK for providing an advance copy of Daughters of Paris via NetGalley for my enjoyment and honest review. It is an enlightening story about life during war, about friendships, hardships – and love. I recommend it without hesitation. All opinions are my own.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    While books about the German Occupation of Paris in WW2, or efforts of the French resistance, are not unusual, I have not read a book that portrays the power of female friendship during those times for a long time. Colette and Fleur grow up together but are from very different worlds. Colette’s family are wealthy and Fleur is an orphan who resides with her aunt, Collette’s family’s housekeeper. The book shows how both Fleur and Colette grow up to become very different people, with different goal While books about the German Occupation of Paris in WW2, or efforts of the French resistance, are not unusual, I have not read a book that portrays the power of female friendship during those times for a long time. Colette and Fleur grow up together but are from very different worlds. Colette’s family are wealthy and Fleur is an orphan who resides with her aunt, Collette’s family’s housekeeper. The book shows how both Fleur and Colette grow up to become very different people, with different goals in life, but ultimately become shaped by the war around them. Aspects of this book are refreshing. It is great to see female strength and resilience as well as how ordinary individuals had their lives interrupted by war, motivating them to become members of the resistance in different forms. However, parts of the book also left me feeling a little dissatisfied. I think the book would have benefited from more detail of the acts of espionage, to really show character development, and it would have highlighted the danger in the work that was done. As it was, the resistance efforts seemed a little lacking and superficial, glamorizing them rather than making them seem realistic. I also think that the real danger of living during occupied Paris was not fully represented; it seemed to me that the book created a sense of inconvenience rather than an enemy invasion. Despite that, I do think that this book is worthy of a read for fans of historical fiction. It was a quick read, with plenty to hold attention, and discussed events (such as Vel d’Hiv) that have not always been addressed in mainstream fiction. I would particularly recommend this to fans of Tatiana de Rosnay. Thanks to NetGalley and HarperCollins UK for the eARC.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lori Sinsel Harris

    Colette and Fleur were raised together, Colette the daughter of a wealthy businessman had all the luxuries her father's money could buy, while Fleur was an orphan being raised by her Aunt Agnes who worked for Colette's parents as their live in housekeeper. As they grow up they begin to drift apart, and when Colette leaves suddenly for England it all but ends their close friendship. When Colette returns 18 months later, just as war is breaking out, the two find they have very little or nothing to Colette and Fleur were raised together, Colette the daughter of a wealthy businessman had all the luxuries her father's money could buy, while Fleur was an orphan being raised by her Aunt Agnes who worked for Colette's parents as their live in housekeeper. As they grow up they begin to drift apart, and when Colette leaves suddenly for England it all but ends their close friendship. When Colette returns 18 months later, just as war is breaking out, the two find they have very little or nothing to say to each other.The divide between them feels like more than they will ever be able to cross. The girls take very different approaches to how they cope with the terrifying changes that are dealt upon their city. Will the war divide them even further or will they once again find common ground and unite, their friendship even stronger than before as they fight the Nazis in their own ways? I enjoyed this novel. It is well written and researched. The author sets time and place well so the reader feels as if they are in occupied Paris, it is well paced and holds the attention well. Fleur is very relatable straight off, where as Colette takes a bit more time to warm up to, but overall bothe prove themselves to be good friends that you would love to know. This is an uplifting book about friendship and family and the everlasting bond created in spite of the evil in the world. I recommend this one to historical fiction fans who enjoy reading WWII books set in the beautiful city of love, Paris! Thank you to the publishers at Harper Collins and to Net Galley for the free ARC, I am leaving my honest review in return.

  23. 4 out of 5

    loopyloulaura

    Colette lives a life of privilege but values her friendship with the orphaned niece of her housekeeper. Their close relationship is damaged by an enforced separation but the looming war brings them back together. Daughters of Paris is an historical novel set in France during the 1930s and 40s. There is a class difference between the main two characters that impacts significantly on their lives and friendship. The war both unites the pair and separates them as their experiences diverge but their lo Colette lives a life of privilege but values her friendship with the orphaned niece of her housekeeper. Their close relationship is damaged by an enforced separation but the looming war brings them back together. Daughters of Paris is an historical novel set in France during the 1930s and 40s. There is a class difference between the main two characters that impacts significantly on their lives and friendship. The war both unites the pair and separates them as their experiences diverge but their love for each other endures. Both women want to contribute to the war effort against the Nazis and this adds a tension to the plot as danger is anticipated. I found it much easier to like Fleur than Colette. Her life is full of loss yet she is resilient. She is not confident with men and the path of love does not run smoothly for her in this book. In contrast, Colette has a self assured confidence despite feeling unloved by her mother. She throws herself into relationships as well as enjoying the finer things in life. I enjoyed the historical aspects of the books and felt that the class and gender norms brought the culture and period to life. The risks that the women take in their personal lives but also in the undermining of the Nazi regime make the reader care about their safety. Daughters of Paris was an enjoyable novel about female friendship against the backdrop of the Nazi occupation of Paris.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    It was OK and would give it 2.5 stars. I absolutely LOVED Daughter of the Sea, so I was excited to read this, unfortunately I just couldn't get into the story. I didn't love any of the characters and had a hard time connecting to any of them. Fleur was so judgmental toward Colette throughout the whole book. Fleur might not have been has privileged as Colette but she definitely benefitted from living with the Nadons. I felt like the book was missing something. Colette and Fleur didn't seem scared It was OK and would give it 2.5 stars. I absolutely LOVED Daughter of the Sea, so I was excited to read this, unfortunately I just couldn't get into the story. I didn't love any of the characters and had a hard time connecting to any of them. Fleur was so judgmental toward Colette throughout the whole book. Fleur might not have been has privileged as Colette but she definitely benefitted from living with the Nadons. I felt like the book was missing something. Colette and Fleur didn't seem scared about anything they were doing. A lot of what was happening in Paris seemed glossed over. Fleur and Colette were always able to get whatever they needed. Colette's parents even got her a baby crib. I'm pretty sure Laurent would have never confided his secret with Fleur. I just didn't care for the relationship between Fleur and Colette. Give the book a try, it just wasn't for me. I didn't hate the book, just found it lacking in certain areas. It was sort of a watered down historical fiction book that centered around the relationship of two woman and not what was going on during the war. Look forward to reading more books by the author. I received a complimentary copy of this book from HarperCollins UK, One More Chapter through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Doreen Prentiss Gabriellini

    Daughters of Paris is my second book by Elisabeth Hobbes. It is a great historical fiction novel that takes place during the German occupation of Paris during World War II. One of Elisabeth Hobbes strong points as a writer are her characters. So when I saw she came out with Daughters of Paris I knew it was a must read for me. The story has so many great attributes. It is part mystery, love, suspense, historical, great strong characters and is extremely well written. This is a wonderful story of Daughters of Paris is my second book by Elisabeth Hobbes. It is a great historical fiction novel that takes place during the German occupation of Paris during World War II. One of Elisabeth Hobbes strong points as a writer are her characters. So when I saw she came out with Daughters of Paris I knew it was a must read for me. The story has so many great attributes. It is part mystery, love, suspense, historical, great strong characters and is extremely well written. This is a wonderful story of female friends who come from two different social classes during an intriguing and horrific time in history. The two women protagonists are very well developed. You feel their emotions, feel sad when they are, feel afraid when they are and cheer them on in their successes. The horrors of occupied Paris are not ignored in this story. It is done in such an empathetic way as to educate and share this important part of history. An added benefit to the story is the threads of romance entwined in it which added to the complexity of the story. When I finished Elisabeth Hobbes’ first book, I was looking forward to seeing what she had in store for us next. Well I am pleased to say she did not disappoint. Well done. Thank you Elisabeth Hobbes, Harper Collins UK, One More Chapter and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jaffareadstoo

    Whilst Colette Nadon and Fleur Bonnivard grow up in the same household in Paris their lives couldn't be more different. Colette, the daughter of the house is spoiled and pampered, whilst Fleur, being the orphaned niece of the housekeeper, is more used to life below stairs. However, despite their different social standing the girls become friends, playing games and sharing secrets that is until, Colette leaves for England leaving Fleur to create a new life for herself. Years later as Europe is on Whilst Colette Nadon and Fleur Bonnivard grow up in the same household in Paris their lives couldn't be more different. Colette, the daughter of the house is spoiled and pampered, whilst Fleur, being the orphaned niece of the housekeeper, is more used to life below stairs. However, despite their different social standing the girls become friends, playing games and sharing secrets that is until, Colette leaves for England leaving Fleur to create a new life for herself. Years later as Europe is on the cusp on war and with the German occupation of Paris not far away, Colette returns, hugging her secrets close. Fleur and Colette soon realise that their secure way of life has disappeared and living in an occupied city has many challenges and hidden dangers. With their own individual problems to work through the women discover that there is an ever present need for watchfulness.The lack of food is a constant problem and yet, both women rise above the challenges and do what they can for the war effort. Both Fleur and Colette are strong characters, with distinct personalities, and observing them grow and develop over the course of the story is what makes this such an enjoyable read. Daughters of Paris is well written historical fiction which looks at the challenge of the lives of women during the German occupation of Paris.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I read this right after reading The Nightingale. And while there were many similarities--Daughters of Paris does, indeed, stand on its own. The story of two childhood best friends, this story started off pulling at my heartstrings. I could already see how difficult it would be for Fleur and Colette to maintain their friendship with such a disparity in circumstances.  Fleur is the niece of Colette's family's domestic help. Which means Fleur is kind of the hired help. And when they're children this I read this right after reading The Nightingale. And while there were many similarities--Daughters of Paris does, indeed, stand on its own. The story of two childhood best friends, this story started off pulling at my heartstrings. I could already see how difficult it would be for Fleur and Colette to maintain their friendship with such a disparity in circumstances.  Fleur is the niece of Colette's family's domestic help. Which means Fleur is kind of the hired help. And when they're children this makes no difference to either of the girls. It isn't until they grow and make different friends that things get more complicated.  There are a variety of circumstances that rip the girls apart and drive them away from their friendship. It isn't until their country, France, is taken over by the Germans when that gap starts to be bridged between them. They each deal with the occupation in their own way. Granted, Fleur, with not as many privileges as Colette, quickly finds herself in the company of fellow French who wish to drive away the Germans at all costs. It isn't until later that Colette also finds her own way of helping. This story was one of friendship, love, and what each person must do in grave times to survive and also to stand up for what they believe in. Even at the detriment of self.  I really loved the way Hobbes weaved this story. The historical background just added to the story and brought me really into the world of Colette and Fleur.  

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bev Harvey

    This novel is set during WWII and the German occupation of Paris. Colette is the only child of very wealthy parents and has all the trappings of the rich. Fleur is an orphan and lives with her Aunt Agnes who is the housekeeper for Colette’s parents. Despite the vast differences in their circumstances the two girls become firm friends. Their close friendship continues until Colette suddenly leaves for England. She returns after eighteen months as war breaks out but the two girls have drifted apar This novel is set during WWII and the German occupation of Paris. Colette is the only child of very wealthy parents and has all the trappings of the rich. Fleur is an orphan and lives with her Aunt Agnes who is the housekeeper for Colette’s parents. Despite the vast differences in their circumstances the two girls become firm friends. Their close friendship continues until Colette suddenly leaves for England. She returns after eighteen months as war breaks out but the two girls have drifted apart. Colette enjoys the party lifestyle while Fleur becomes involved in the French Resistance. Life under German laws and curfews was hard which brings the two girls back together with Colette also helping the resistance. I’m an avid reader of WWII novels and this was up there with the best. It took me a while to get into the story but it was so worthwhile. It has all that I enjoy. Strong women, enduring friendship and love. This is the second book I’ve read from this author and look forward to more. My thanks to NetGalley and One More Chapter Harper Collins for the opportunity to read and review such a captivating story

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This novel covers WWII through the eyes of two young women that grew up as best friends although one was the daughter of a rich family and the other the niece of their housekeeper. The story d’élèves into various parts of the war but sugar coats what happens to those that are sent to the camps by the nazis and how many people were treated. Both women did help with the resistance but it was not written in a way that gave you the instant feeling of fear for their lives. I liked the characters but This novel covers WWII through the eyes of two young women that grew up as best friends although one was the daughter of a rich family and the other the niece of their housekeeper. The story d’élèves into various parts of the war but sugar coats what happens to those that are sent to the camps by the nazis and how many people were treated. Both women did help with the resistance but it was not written in a way that gave you the instant feeling of fear for their lives. I liked the characters but I just found I couldn’t feel enough emotion for them to become attached. I can’t put my finger on what was missing but this book just didn’t draw me in or have me fearing for their lives. Not enough emotion for me. I would like to thank One More Chapter for the chance to read this ARC. I have really liked other books by this author so it’s just a one off that this one didn’t give me the same emotions as the others. It is still an all round good book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lorin (paperbackbish)

    This was a lovely WWII historical fiction novel that focused on the relationships between the female characters, which I appreciated. And there is romance, of course, because what is a wartime novel set in Paris without a bit of romance? I'd say that this particular story is more character-driven than plot-driven, as it revolves more around the interactions of the characters and less around the actual details of their wartime efforts. There is a glimpse into Fleur's efforts with the Resistance, This was a lovely WWII historical fiction novel that focused on the relationships between the female characters, which I appreciated. And there is romance, of course, because what is a wartime novel set in Paris without a bit of romance? I'd say that this particular story is more character-driven than plot-driven, as it revolves more around the interactions of the characters and less around the actual details of their wartime efforts. There is a glimpse into Fleur's efforts with the Resistance, and a few into Collette's charitable actions to help her friends, but these don't comprise the bulk of the narrative. It is less about the war and more about the ties that bind, including the romantic entanglements of the two girls. It's not quite what I expected, but if you go into it knowing that it is a historical romance, I don't think you'll be disappointed at all. Thank you to Elisabeth Hobbes, HarperCollins UK/One More Chapter, and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this ARC!

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