Hot Best Seller

The Art and Soul of Dune: Limited Edition

Availability: Ready to download

Insight Editions has partnered with Dune’s executive producer Tanya Lapointe to share an insider's look at how Villeneuve and his team successfully adapted a legendary novel long thought unfilmable. To celebrate this achievement, Insight Editions is offering a lavish Limited Edition version of The Art and Soul of Dune, written by Tanya Lapointe. Created with the same passio Insight Editions has partnered with Dune’s executive producer Tanya Lapointe to share an insider's look at how Villeneuve and his team successfully adapted a legendary novel long thought unfilmable. To celebrate this achievement, Insight Editions is offering a lavish Limited Edition version of The Art and Soul of Dune, written by Tanya Lapointe. Created with the same passion and exacting detail as Villeneuve’s hugely anticipated film, The Art and Soul of Dune: Limited Edition includes a variety of exclusive items personally crafted and overseen by the cast and crew. ● A Limited Edition version of The Art and Soul of Dune, featuring an exclusive cloth cover with ornate, foil-stamped Atreides and Harkonnen symbols. ● An exclusive companion volume titled simply Dune, featuring the candid and intimate on-set photography of Oscar-nominated director of photography Greig Fraser, accompanied by Josh Brolin’s personal perspective and recollections of the production. This volume, designed, custom printed, and hand bound with a variety of fine Japanese papers, provides an authentic and tactile experience that reflects the aesthetics of the film. ● A signed and numbered signature card individually inscribed by director Denis Villeneuve, author and executive producer Tanya Lapointe, star Josh Brolin, and director of photography Greig Fraser. (Note: The first printing signature card included star Timothée Chalamet.) ● A unique, cloth-bound reproduction of the Fremkit instruction booklet prop created for the movie, featuring 80 pages of exclusive unseen art from the film. ● Packaged in an elaborate deluxe clamshell case wrapped in saifu cloth featuring copper-stamped bespoke imagery based on the Bene Gesserit designs created for the movie.


Compare

Insight Editions has partnered with Dune’s executive producer Tanya Lapointe to share an insider's look at how Villeneuve and his team successfully adapted a legendary novel long thought unfilmable. To celebrate this achievement, Insight Editions is offering a lavish Limited Edition version of The Art and Soul of Dune, written by Tanya Lapointe. Created with the same passio Insight Editions has partnered with Dune’s executive producer Tanya Lapointe to share an insider's look at how Villeneuve and his team successfully adapted a legendary novel long thought unfilmable. To celebrate this achievement, Insight Editions is offering a lavish Limited Edition version of The Art and Soul of Dune, written by Tanya Lapointe. Created with the same passion and exacting detail as Villeneuve’s hugely anticipated film, The Art and Soul of Dune: Limited Edition includes a variety of exclusive items personally crafted and overseen by the cast and crew. ● A Limited Edition version of The Art and Soul of Dune, featuring an exclusive cloth cover with ornate, foil-stamped Atreides and Harkonnen symbols. ● An exclusive companion volume titled simply Dune, featuring the candid and intimate on-set photography of Oscar-nominated director of photography Greig Fraser, accompanied by Josh Brolin’s personal perspective and recollections of the production. This volume, designed, custom printed, and hand bound with a variety of fine Japanese papers, provides an authentic and tactile experience that reflects the aesthetics of the film. ● A signed and numbered signature card individually inscribed by director Denis Villeneuve, author and executive producer Tanya Lapointe, star Josh Brolin, and director of photography Greig Fraser. (Note: The first printing signature card included star Timothée Chalamet.) ● A unique, cloth-bound reproduction of the Fremkit instruction booklet prop created for the movie, featuring 80 pages of exclusive unseen art from the film. ● Packaged in an elaborate deluxe clamshell case wrapped in saifu cloth featuring copper-stamped bespoke imagery based on the Bene Gesserit designs created for the movie.

30 review for The Art and Soul of Dune: Limited Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gerhard

    The desert inspires a deep sensation of isolation in one's heart. It provokes inevitable introspection. Like a microscope, the desert magnifies our existential fears. Stripped down from any social construction, and in direct contact with the vertigo of infinite space and time, we are left naked. The desert brings us back hypnotically to our very own human condition. - Denis Villeneuve Up to the point when I saw David Lynch’s ‘Dune’ (1984) in the cinema, I had been preconditioned to think that SF The desert inspires a deep sensation of isolation in one's heart. It provokes inevitable introspection. Like a microscope, the desert magnifies our existential fears. Stripped down from any social construction, and in direct contact with the vertigo of infinite space and time, we are left naked. The desert brings us back hypnotically to our very own human condition. - Denis Villeneuve Up to the point when I saw David Lynch’s ‘Dune’ (1984) in the cinema, I had been preconditioned to think that SF movies were all like ‘Star Wars’. Lynch blew that notion out of the water – well, buried it in sand and spice and weirdness – and at the same time changed my view of the power and potential of cinema. It was sometime later that I managed to get hold of a copy of ‘The Making of Dune’ by Ed Naha, which began a lifelong obsession with the minutiae of moviemaking. Perfunctorily written and filled with grainy half-page black-and-white photographs, the book still struck a deep chord with me. Far from dispelling the magic of the movie, it made me appreciate the obsession of the director in getting his singular vision onto the screen, let alone the vast collaboration behind every single frame. Ed Naha’s book is light years from the lavish ‘making of’ books that accompanied Peter Jackson’s ‘Lord of the Rings’ trilogy, up to then the gold standard. Crucially, there were separate books dedicated to the concept drawings and movie art alone. Somewhere in the middle of these two high points are J.W. Rinzler’s exhaustive accounts of the making of the first ‘Star Wars’ trilogy. And I do mean exhaustive: Every single script variation and spurned idea is accorded the same amount of reverence as any second of screen time of the finished product. And then you have a genius like Tanya Lapointe, who combines the fixation on detail of Naha and Rinzler with the artistic vision that made the LOTR making-of books so special. It is quite deliberate that this book is called ‘The Art and Soul of Dune’, for it is as much about the creative process of world-building that such an adaptation calls for as much as it is about the filmmaking process itself. A producer on the movie herself, Lapointe gives an incredibly vivid account of the herculean undertaking this movie was, which saw 45 sets built on five soundstages on Budapest. Even the backlot was put to good use to create the sense of scale that was mandatory. In addition, location work took place in Jordan, Abu Dhabi, Norway, and the Mojave Desert in California. The contents of the book are quite straightforward: An ‘Introduction’ by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson, and an essay entitled ‘This Is Only The Beginning’ by Denis Villeneuve himself, is followed by separate chapters on ‘Caladan’, ‘Giedi Prime’, ‘Salusa Secundus’, ‘Arrakis’, ‘The Attack’, ‘Deep Desert’, ‘Fremen’ and an ‘Epilogue’. Each chapter recounts how that world or key narrative point was brought to life, including its principal characters. There are tons of behind-the-scenes trivia about the prop making and production design, as well as the costumes and visual effects, but the detail never feels overwhelming or redundant. Some diehard cineastes may feel cheated in not being told what lenses DP Greig Fraser used, but this is not that kind of book. I must say I am surprised there is nothing about the score or sound editing, but it is entirely possible Lapointe’s 2020 deadline preceded the actual movie even being finished. A lot of what looks like actual stills from the movie, spread over two glorious pages apiece, are stunning concept art and drawings. Many of these were translated directly into sets, replete with lighting design and camera angles. There are a number of surprises here in terms of filmed scenes that did not make the final cut. Perhaps the most controversial is Gurney Halleck playing the baliset. Not only is there is a still from the actual filmed scene featuring Josh Brolin, Lapointe goes into some detail about how the instrument was brought to life, with a ballad based on Herbert’s words and a melody by Hans Zimmer. I am unsure if this was an unintentional outcome of Lapointe’s focus in the text, but I was surprised at how much final say the Herbert Estate, spearheaded by son Brian Herbert, had over the final movie. For example, it is clear that cut scenes like ‘Duncan’s Drop’ were, well, dropped as they did not adhere to ‘canon’. There are other telling revelations such as the Herbert Estate insisting that Arrakeen look more like a ‘government building’ than a ‘palace’, which is rather odd. What is also clear is that the Herbert Estate were intending a franchise when they initially sold the rights to Legendary Pictures, so it is uncertain how much Villeneuve’s ‘two-movie’ dictum was actually influenced by this requirement. This is quite a pricey item (not to mention the fantastic signed limited edition), so I opted for the much cheaper ebook. I was a bit nervous before my purchase, as the physical object is a fantastic collectors’ item that will stand proud on any SF fan’s bookshelf. But I was relieved that the ebook works a treat, allowing for awesome full-screen panoramas of the artwork (without the page binding). Plus, you can zoom in to your heart’s content. This visual treasure trove is highly recommended for all Dune and movie fans in general.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andreas

    This book is a look behind the scenes, counting 240 pages in coffee-table format. It has many concept arts spanning double pages which make them all the more immersive. At first glance, they seem to be screen shots from the film, but on closer inspection, they are beautifully drawn works of art, used as a basis for the making of the film.  The book features all the protagonists on several pages, shows their outfits, weapons, and talks about the actors' views on their motivations. The same goes fo This book is a look behind the scenes, counting 240 pages in coffee-table format. It has many concept arts spanning double pages which make them all the more immersive. At first glance, they seem to be screen shots from the film, but on closer inspection, they are beautifully drawn works of art, used as a basis for the making of the film.  The book features all the protagonists on several pages, shows their outfits, weapons, and talks about the actors' views on their motivations. The same goes for all the relevant planets and their inhabitants.  Denis Villeneuve has a say in everything, he explains the background and rationalization and tricks for many of the scenes. They don't take away the magic of the film but bring it even more to life. Why not five stars? There is a lot of text mixed into the pictures, but it is hard to read it. The text is also far too focused on Villeneuve, and often enough it only tells you that he's decided something without bringing forth the artist's own rationalizations. I'd have loved to get more unfiltered background information about challenges and solutions.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sean Smart

    A beautiful book explaining much of the spectacular new movie

  4. 4 out of 5

    Omar

    "Like a microscope, the desert magnifies our existential fears. Stripped down from any social construction and in direct contact with the infinity of space and time, we are left naked. The desert brings us back hypnotically to our very own human condition. It induces joy, humility, melancholia, and sometimes a barren terror. That exact feeling of isolation is what sparked the inspiration for Dune's production" -Denis Villeneuve, from the introduction I really love the aesthetic, music, and tone fo "Like a microscope, the desert magnifies our existential fears. Stripped down from any social construction and in direct contact with the infinity of space and time, we are left naked. The desert brings us back hypnotically to our very own human condition. It induces joy, humility, melancholia, and sometimes a barren terror. That exact feeling of isolation is what sparked the inspiration for Dune's production" -Denis Villeneuve, from the introduction I really love the aesthetic, music, and tone for this film. It's dream-like and melancholic with a spiritual quest at the heart of the story towards maturity and salvation. It's as-if Denis took the man in Caspar Freidrich's "Wander above the Sea of Fog" and made a space fantasy adventure around that figure under the guise of 'Dune'. I'm looking forward to the sequels. Denis is a master.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    How do you review a book based on the design and construction of a film based on one of my favourite books. Well if you followed that sentenced then you will know - with great care and no doubt a lot fo work. So here is the art and soul (seems to be a growing trend from Titan Publishing) of Dune one of my most anticipated films of recent years (which if you have not guessed already blew me away and I am so glad and impatient to see the second part). The book traces the ideas and concepts for the How do you review a book based on the design and construction of a film based on one of my favourite books. Well if you followed that sentenced then you will know - with great care and no doubt a lot fo work. So here is the art and soul (seems to be a growing trend from Titan Publishing) of Dune one of my most anticipated films of recent years (which if you have not guessed already blew me away and I am so glad and impatient to see the second part). The book traces the ideas and concepts for the film, its sets and devices as well as the characters and locations - from ideas to reality (revealing a few of the film makers tricks and tools along the way). IF you loved the film or even mildly interested in it for that matter this is a great book to see behind the wizards curtain to see how it was all done. I know some feel these books diminish the spectacle of the film - not me, I see these books of the celebration of ingenuity and creativity - at a level I will never truly understand but more than happy to appreciate.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael Burnam-Fink

    Okay, so The Art and Soul of Dune is glossy marketing material for obsessive Dune fans, of which I am one. Concept art is interlaced with behind the scene pictures and stills from the movie, along with brief passages describing the production. In an age of access, Art and Soul conceals more than it reveals. But Dune doesn't need help, the movie stands on its own as a masterpiece. One thing that comes through is Denis Villeneuve's uncompromising production design. Villeneuve loves Dune. He had "Mu Okay, so The Art and Soul of Dune is glossy marketing material for obsessive Dune fans, of which I am one. Concept art is interlaced with behind the scene pictures and stills from the movie, along with brief passages describing the production. In an age of access, Art and Soul conceals more than it reveals. But Dune doesn't need help, the movie stands on its own as a masterpiece. One thing that comes through is Denis Villeneuve's uncompromising production design. Villeneuve loves Dune. He had "Muad'Dib" engraved on the inside of his high school graduation ring. The fact that he's a very talented filmmaker and also the only person on the planet who loves Dune more than me is at the heart of the movie's success. Villeneuve gets great people and brings out their best, from the gaffer's assistant up to the stars. That obsession, to get the big picture right and to get all the details right, is the soul of the movie. So what did I learn? Well, the ornithopter was an actual physical prop so large it had to be shipped around the world by An-124, the world's second largest cargo plane. A 300 ton crane operated by a Jordanian man who didn't share a language with the production made it fly in the desert. A film studio in Budapest was taken over to create the massive brutalist sets that Villeneuve loves. Some of the roads not taken are interesting. Apparently there's another few hours of footage floating around, including the Arrakeen dinner scene (and by the way, I would do a lot to see those deleted scenes), though a fair number are introductions not used. An early version of the Atreides castle on Caladan is almost like a cross between a D-Day bunker and Falling Water. Some preliminary sandworm designs look unfortunately like leeches or uncircumcised penises, so I'm glad we got the version we did. It's interesting reading this book against Naha's The Making of Dune , about the 1984 Lynch film. We know the ending, but the sense that comes out of Naha's book is how amateurish Lynch's film was. Not that it didn't have talented people involved, but many of them had never made a scifi epic of this scale. And while Dune is bigger than Villeneuve's previous films, it's a step in a progress that includes Blade Runner 2049 and Arrival by someone who's been thinking about how to make this exact film since he was 12.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wendelle

    transporting and evocative medieval-fantasy, and the filmmakers and creators were clearly intentional about the optics, and narrative, of a foreign, more technologically advanced 'savior' coming to the desert filled with riches of a mono-resource (spices) and becoming the liberator and leader of the 'people of the desert'-- an allegorical take that sets up the pieces for the ultimate future tragedy of the character and indicates we are not seeing a simple, auspicious coming-of-age fantasy transporting and evocative medieval-fantasy, and the filmmakers and creators were clearly intentional about the optics, and narrative, of a foreign, more technologically advanced 'savior' coming to the desert filled with riches of a mono-resource (spices) and becoming the liberator and leader of the 'people of the desert'-- an allegorical take that sets up the pieces for the ultimate future tragedy of the character and indicates we are not seeing a simple, auspicious coming-of-age fantasy

  8. 4 out of 5

    Martti

    A beautiful companion to a superb movie. Maybe what I missed was some in-depth explanation for some choices in the script. I'm hoping to get more on that in the Bluray with commentary or making-of documentary. I wonder if I got the only copy in Estonia, because it definitely was the only copy in the bookshop. A beautiful companion to a superb movie. Maybe what I missed was some in-depth explanation for some choices in the script. I'm hoping to get more on that in the Bluray with commentary or making-of documentary. I wonder if I got the only copy in Estonia, because it definitely was the only copy in the bookshop.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    The big standout from this book is that it's written by Tanya Lapointe, one of the executive producers of the film so she had unfettered access to many of those involved. This allows her to interview most of the big names in the crew and cast, which is often lacking in "The Art of..." books. Structurally it follows the story of the film, starting with a brief history of "Dune" on screen, Denis Villenueve's attachment before covering each section of the film, "Caladan", "Giedi Prime", "Arakis" etc The big standout from this book is that it's written by Tanya Lapointe, one of the executive producers of the film so she had unfettered access to many of those involved. This allows her to interview most of the big names in the crew and cast, which is often lacking in "The Art of..." books. Structurally it follows the story of the film, starting with a brief history of "Dune" on screen, Denis Villenueve's attachment before covering each section of the film, "Caladan", "Giedi Prime", "Arakis" etc. As we begin each chapter it covers off the design of the planet, the creatures, costumes, weapons and vehicles as well as the casting process for characters who appear in the section before moving onto the next section. I'm quite fond of this format as it allows the reader to experience the film all over again. The art is obviousy fantastic, and it thankfully has a fairly in depth discussion on why they went with certain designs. Sometimes a picture speaks a thousand words, but honestly I just want to hear the creatives discuss these things that spend so long building. Needed more pictures of Timothée Chalamet though.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Feels like a wonderful cash grab. Altough the drawings and pictures ooze the same beauty as the movie, the book itself feel unfinished and not really knowing what it wants to be: a making of (too shallow), an art exposition (again too shallow), or a movie summary in pictures (it includes scenes that were cut out in the final release and now feel out of place). Upon further inspection I noticed the book came out in 2020, that's a year before the movie came out, which explains a lot and why, for m Feels like a wonderful cash grab. Altough the drawings and pictures ooze the same beauty as the movie, the book itself feel unfinished and not really knowing what it wants to be: a making of (too shallow), an art exposition (again too shallow), or a movie summary in pictures (it includes scenes that were cut out in the final release and now feel out of place). Upon further inspection I noticed the book came out in 2020, that's a year before the movie came out, which explains a lot and why, for me, the book doesn't deliver what I thought it promised (an indepth look into how the visuals and art were created). Than again, there's some very nice pictures in it 😏

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Mckay

    It does not cost $165m to write a book, or adapt a book into a script. Building a fictional world with art in such a way that it is believable is an epic endeavour, and the Art and Soul of Dune does a decent job casting a light on the intentionality behind designs that sometimes get only seconds of screen time. Dune Pt I is a movie conveyed visually. Likewise, you won't be reading this book for it's prose, however the sketchbooks provide a feast for the eyes and an understanding behind the art o It does not cost $165m to write a book, or adapt a book into a script. Building a fictional world with art in such a way that it is believable is an epic endeavour, and the Art and Soul of Dune does a decent job casting a light on the intentionality behind designs that sometimes get only seconds of screen time. Dune Pt I is a movie conveyed visually. Likewise, you won't be reading this book for it's prose, however the sketchbooks provide a feast for the eyes and an understanding behind the art of the universe that is just what I was hoping for and a great companion to watching the movie.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    An amazing book featuring original artwork, stills, and background information on the Dune Part One movie. Clearly this was a labour of love for all involved, especially director, Denis Villeneuve. The designs are wonderful, almost transcendent, taking you into a world that feels real and important. Reading this makes me want to see the film again, if only to experience better the relationship between people, nature and environment that is at the core of the story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Terence

    I loved Dune, the 2021 movie. And I loved reading how the director Denis Villeneuve and screenwriter Eric Roth allowed their passion they both had since reading Dune as kids to drive how they created this movie. I always like "behind the scenes" tales of how something was made and the recollections in this book show that almost every little detail in this movie had a reason and a story behind it. I loved Dune, the 2021 movie. And I loved reading how the director Denis Villeneuve and screenwriter Eric Roth allowed their passion they both had since reading Dune as kids to drive how they created this movie. I always like "behind the scenes" tales of how something was made and the recollections in this book show that almost every little detail in this movie had a reason and a story behind it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    A beautiful book and an excellent complement to the movie The Art and Soul of Dune belongs on every fan's bookshelf. I knocked a star off because the text could be a little meatier, but the illustrations are gorgeous, and this is a book where the slipcase adds to the overall package. Highly recommended for fans of the movie, nice visuals even if you've only read the book. A beautiful book and an excellent complement to the movie The Art and Soul of Dune belongs on every fan's bookshelf. I knocked a star off because the text could be a little meatier, but the illustrations are gorgeous, and this is a book where the slipcase adds to the overall package. Highly recommended for fans of the movie, nice visuals even if you've only read the book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jakub

    Did you like the recent Dune movie? If yes, get this book - it's beautiful, has some really good art, opens useful insight behind the decisions made about the movie, and is a lovely treat. I just wished they've talked about the Atreidean salute; it was such a *good* addition to the overall mood of the story. :) Did you like the recent Dune movie? If yes, get this book - it's beautiful, has some really good art, opens useful insight behind the decisions made about the movie, and is a lovely treat. I just wished they've talked about the Atreidean salute; it was such a *good* addition to the overall mood of the story. :)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mars

    It took two months to get this book back from out-of-stock preorder, and it was worth every bit of the wait. This is as stunning and gorgeous as the film, highlighting so much of the love that has gone into this whole production.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    An absolute treat of a coffee-table book for fans of the novel and the Villeneuve film(s). Beautifully textured and bound, with hundreds of concept art pieces and on-set photographs set to a backdrop of detailed descriptions of the film’s creative process. A must-have.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dan Trefethen

    This book could be considered a celebration of the six Academy Awards in technical, sound and design work garnered by Dune, the movie. Although the book came out in advance of the Oscars, it details the efforts and accomplishments of those people cited in the awards. As with any lavishly designed speculative fiction movie (I'm looking at you, Lord of the Rings trilogy), the story behind the story is interesting. This book shows much of the original concept art, and variations of costumes and equi This book could be considered a celebration of the six Academy Awards in technical, sound and design work garnered by Dune, the movie. Although the book came out in advance of the Oscars, it details the efforts and accomplishments of those people cited in the awards. As with any lavishly designed speculative fiction movie (I'm looking at you, Lord of the Rings trilogy), the story behind the story is interesting. This book shows much of the original concept art, and variations of costumes and equipment considered, rejected and refined to what you see in the movie. The first movie has laid the groundwork and expectation in design, sound and visual effects. The second movie should be an exciting extension of it, with a more complex narrative arc for the characters (mainly Paul), more of the Fremen culture, and most importantly sandworms! Praise Shai-Hulud, the Maker! Can't wait for the October 2023 premiere of the second movie.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This is a beautiful book

  20. 4 out of 5

    The_J

    Spectacular Art shown in the visual choices of the movie, and character creations

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marc

    Beautiful book illustrating the amazing effort that went into creating the movie. A lot of detailed physical props were made. This certainly contributed to the movie's huge success. Beautiful book illustrating the amazing effort that went into creating the movie. A lot of detailed physical props were made. This certainly contributed to the movie's huge success.

  22. 4 out of 5

    David

    Beautiful book! Glad I library-d it rather than bought it…and I own plenty of similar volumes.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Beth Voecks

    The photography, behind-the-scenes commentary, and art are phenomenal.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marc Ternes

    Very well made and beautiful, this is essentially the Dune 2021 film Special Features disc adapted into a book. Well made, but redundant.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Murray

    Would have made it a five star had they directly credited the concept artists on each piece the way the Star Wars books have done. That said, the content is great and the book is beautiful.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Emilia🥀

    Gorgeous

  27. 4 out of 5

    Philip Tite

    Amazing companion piece to a fantastic cinematic experience.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    Fantastic art

  29. 4 out of 5

    Connor Smith

    Not at all essential for the fan of Villeneuve’s Dune, but nifty enough — I enjoyed reading the rationales behind each casting decision and seeing the concept art for each setting and costume.

  30. 5 out of 5

    brooke

    the things i would do to experience dune for the first time

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...