Hot Best Seller

Stem Cell Now: A Brief Introduction to the Coming of Medical Revolution

Availability: Ready to download

While many believe stem cell research holds the key to curing a wide range of ailments, others see this research as opening a Pandora's box that will devalue human life.In Stem Cell Now, Christopher Scott--executive director of Stanford University's Stem Cells and Society Program--lays out the scientific and ethical issues surrounding this national dilemma. Scott guides re While many believe stem cell research holds the key to curing a wide range of ailments, others see this research as opening a Pandora's box that will devalue human life.In Stem Cell Now, Christopher Scott--executive director of Stanford University's Stem Cells and Society Program--lays out the scientific and ethical issues surrounding this national dilemma. Scott guides readers through the latest advances in stem cell research in clear, accessible language, telling the stories of the researchers who are exploring the potential of stem cells to cure cancer, grow new organs, and repair the immune system. He also leads readers through a discussion of the question at the heart of the explosive ethical debate: How, as a society, do we balance our responsibilities to the unborn and the sick? Stem Cell Now is essential reading for anyone who wants to build an informed opinion on stem cell research.


Compare

While many believe stem cell research holds the key to curing a wide range of ailments, others see this research as opening a Pandora's box that will devalue human life.In Stem Cell Now, Christopher Scott--executive director of Stanford University's Stem Cells and Society Program--lays out the scientific and ethical issues surrounding this national dilemma. Scott guides re While many believe stem cell research holds the key to curing a wide range of ailments, others see this research as opening a Pandora's box that will devalue human life.In Stem Cell Now, Christopher Scott--executive director of Stanford University's Stem Cells and Society Program--lays out the scientific and ethical issues surrounding this national dilemma. Scott guides readers through the latest advances in stem cell research in clear, accessible language, telling the stories of the researchers who are exploring the potential of stem cells to cure cancer, grow new organs, and repair the immune system. He also leads readers through a discussion of the question at the heart of the explosive ethical debate: How, as a society, do we balance our responsibilities to the unborn and the sick? Stem Cell Now is essential reading for anyone who wants to build an informed opinion on stem cell research.

30 review for Stem Cell Now: A Brief Introduction to the Coming of Medical Revolution

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bojan Tunguz

    Over the past decade or so stem cells have become a household term. Most of this is based on the significance that these cells have in building and repairing of the living tissues. Consequently, it is believed and hoped that the mastery over these cells will give us an unprecedented access to new therapeutical techniques and it would advance medicine by an unprecedented amount. However, the use of stem cells, particularly those that are derived from embryos, is fraught with serious ethical chall Over the past decade or so stem cells have become a household term. Most of this is based on the significance that these cells have in building and repairing of the living tissues. Consequently, it is believed and hoped that the mastery over these cells will give us an unprecedented access to new therapeutical techniques and it would advance medicine by an unprecedented amount. However, the use of stem cells, particularly those that are derived from embryos, is fraught with serious ethical challenges. Unfortunately, most of the debate and issues that are raised are not readily accessible, because the sheer number and variety of terms, concepts and ideas can be overwhelming and subtle differences can have major consequences, both biologically and ethically. In light of that, a good introductory book to the topic of stem cells is invaluable and "Stem Cell Now" fits that task perfectly. It is supremely informative without getting overwhelming with technical jargon, and it's accessible and eminently readable. Its primary purpose is to describe the science behind the stem cells, what we in fact know about them, and in this respect it is a valuable resource. The book, however, does not shy from advocacy and Christopher Scott is a clear proponent of lifting most serious restrictions on the use of stem cells in research in the United States. On the other hand he is not dogmatic about his positions and he recognizes that there is a serious ongoing debate on the subject. He presents the opposing viewpoints as well without deriding them or being condescending, and the reader is free to form his or her opinion, or to seek out further information on the subject. One danger of writing a book on a very active ongoing field of research is that new discoveries are made almost daily, and some major new breakthroughs have come about since this book came out of print (like successfully inducing human adult somatic cells to become stem cells.) However, the body of knowledge and the scientific understanding that has been presented in this book has already had a pretty long shelf life and it will continue to be a valuable resource and a good first introduction to stem cells for years to come.

  2. 5 out of 5

    J.S.

    As a resident of the state of California, I participated in a recent election where we voted on whether or not to publicly fund stem cell research. A friend gave me a paper that explained her church's view on the matter and why they opposed it. Being a religious person myself (of a different faith which has not voiced an opinion on the issue) I could relate to some of the same concerns. Then recently I heard a radio interview with the author of this book where he contradicted some of the "facts" As a resident of the state of California, I participated in a recent election where we voted on whether or not to publicly fund stem cell research. A friend gave me a paper that explained her church's view on the matter and why they opposed it. Being a religious person myself (of a different faith which has not voiced an opinion on the issue) I could relate to some of the same concerns. Then recently I heard a radio interview with the author of this book where he contradicted some of the "facts" I had read, so I decided to learn more for myself. Mr. Scott said in the interview that he tried to present both sides of the argument as fairly as possible. Although there's no doubt which side he's on I felt he respectfully presented the views of those who oppose the research - and without trying to refute or explain them away either. He explains very clearly what stem cells are and why there is so much attention to their research; why adult stem cells are not as potent as embryonic stem cells (although still valuable); and clears up much of the confusion that is caused by media reports over terminology such as "cloning" and "embryonic." He is also very careful to stress that much of the over-hyped potential of stem cells may be a very long time coming, if it ever shows results at all, but is still worthy of research. He also explains why government funding is important to keep the exchange of information open and in the public domain. Overall, this is a very rational explanation (unlike one "angry" review here) of the issue and the politics involved. His arguments are mostly sound, and delivered in an easy to comprehend manner that works well even for those who haven't had a biology class since high school. An easy to read book that I can recommend for anyone who wants to better understand this very important issue.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Megan M.

    An excellent book that covers the basics of stem cells, from the science to the ethics. If you aren't convinced of the therapeutic benefits stem cell research is capable of, then read this book to get an idea. Often, people are weary about stem cell use because of the debate about the morality of using Embryonic stem cells, but there are many more types of stem cells at many different stages of development. From my point of view, the blastocyst that is essentially the gold of stem cell therapy i An excellent book that covers the basics of stem cells, from the science to the ethics. If you aren't convinced of the therapeutic benefits stem cell research is capable of, then read this book to get an idea. Often, people are weary about stem cell use because of the debate about the morality of using Embryonic stem cells, but there are many more types of stem cells at many different stages of development. From my point of view, the blastocyst that is essentially the gold of stem cell therapy is completely ethical and not yet a human being. As the book states, just because we are potentially dead does not mean we should be treated as though we are dead. Same goes for the potential of life in an embryo. There are a lot of risks and while I believe in the use of ESCs, there are many guidelines that ethical scientists should follow. Regardless of whether ESCs are ethically okay to use or not, stem cells in general are the future cure for many diseases and injuries, and I'm excited to be a part of the research.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This is an amazing book if you're one of those people that likes learning for the sake of learning. Not only describing the biology but the ethics of stem cell research, this book was designed to educate the public about a hot button topic. I would highly recommend this to anyone interested in science, or would like to form an intellectual opinion concerning the controversy of stem cell research. This is an amazing book if you're one of those people that likes learning for the sake of learning. Not only describing the biology but the ethics of stem cell research, this book was designed to educate the public about a hot button topic. I would highly recommend this to anyone interested in science, or would like to form an intellectual opinion concerning the controversy of stem cell research.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    A very interesting read. If anything I found the first half of the book much more interesting and engaging than the second; the latter being about the political implications and issues where the start is a rough guide to the science behind it. Very readable - if anything a little to easy to skim through for my liking, though that may be because this is not my first foray into this area. A very good introduction that has left me wanting to see how these new technologies have progressed

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jack Stringer

    This book was very good and it explained all the points of view and arguments and has help me better understand the sickness of which my father has been diagnosed with (multiple sclerosis) and has made me a little hopeful that stem cells will have a cure for multiple diseases.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    I picked this book up for a project, hoping it would cover both sides of this argument fairly. However, I felt it to be quite biased when covering the moral and political part of the book. Other then that, it was very informative.

  8. 4 out of 5

    kara

    everyone who thinks stem cells are 'babies' should read this. everyone who thinks stem cells are 'babies' should read this.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    A readable introduction to everything related to stem cells.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Again, guessing no one will be breaking down my door to get their hands on this. It's very informative though. Again, guessing no one will be breaking down my door to get their hands on this. It's very informative though.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dara

    A little boring, but some good info...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gypsy Novela

    great book, fairly domestic though considerable research is needed to know the lingo of this up and coming project.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This book was OK. Not too relevant to my research, hence the lower rating. Otherwise, it's got good information to know about. This book was OK. Not too relevant to my research, hence the lower rating. Otherwise, it's got good information to know about.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Helen

  15. 5 out of 5

    Constantinos Aslanides

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael Witherspoon

  17. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Potter

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Adair

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vani Patel

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michaeld

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Cummings

  23. 4 out of 5

    Arie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  25. 5 out of 5

    Serkan Erdin

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Ann

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amber

  28. 5 out of 5

    S.P. Flannery

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jim-o

  30. 5 out of 5

    Fernando

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...