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Cultivating the Rosebuds: The Education of Women at the Cherokee Female Seminary, 1851-1909

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Established by the Cherokee Nation in 1851 in present-day eastern Oklahoma, the nondenominational Cherokee Female Seminary was one of the most important schools in the history of American Indian education. Devon Mihesuah explores its curriculum, faculty, administration, and educational philosophy. Recipient of a 1995 Critics' Choice Award of the American Educational Studie Established by the Cherokee Nation in 1851 in present-day eastern Oklahoma, the nondenominational Cherokee Female Seminary was one of the most important schools in the history of American Indian education. Devon Mihesuah explores its curriculum, faculty, administration, and educational philosophy. Recipient of a 1995 Critics' Choice Award of the American Educational Studies Association. 24 photos.


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Established by the Cherokee Nation in 1851 in present-day eastern Oklahoma, the nondenominational Cherokee Female Seminary was one of the most important schools in the history of American Indian education. Devon Mihesuah explores its curriculum, faculty, administration, and educational philosophy. Recipient of a 1995 Critics' Choice Award of the American Educational Studie Established by the Cherokee Nation in 1851 in present-day eastern Oklahoma, the nondenominational Cherokee Female Seminary was one of the most important schools in the history of American Indian education. Devon Mihesuah explores its curriculum, faculty, administration, and educational philosophy. Recipient of a 1995 Critics' Choice Award of the American Educational Studies Association. 24 photos.

30 review for Cultivating the Rosebuds: The Education of Women at the Cherokee Female Seminary, 1851-1909

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amy Sturgis

    Cultivating the Rosebuds invites a conversation about the education of women at the Cherokee Female Seminary from 1851 to 1909. It's by no means the final word on the subject, as Devon Mihesuah makes clear; instead, Mihesuah poses fascinating questions and sets the stage for research and investigations to come. She does an able job of explaining how unique this institution (and, for that matter, the Cherokee values and assumptions undergirding it) truly was in the larger context of female educat Cultivating the Rosebuds invites a conversation about the education of women at the Cherokee Female Seminary from 1851 to 1909. It's by no means the final word on the subject, as Devon Mihesuah makes clear; instead, Mihesuah poses fascinating questions and sets the stage for research and investigations to come. She does an able job of explaining how unique this institution (and, for that matter, the Cherokee values and assumptions undergirding it) truly was in the larger context of female education and Native American education at the time. The book also points out how the school's requirements and curriculum 1) highlighted distinctions of physiology (full-blood, mixed-blood, etc.) and cultural adherence (traditionalist, assimilationist, etc.) among the students and 2) prepared the young "rose buds" for a "true woman" role in which Native women might never be wholly accepted by the mainstream (that is, white) United States. I was particularly interested in Mihesuah's discussion about the Mount Holyoke connection to the development of the Cherokee Female Seminary and how, in later years, an Eastern-feminist-"New Woman" ideal challenged the more domestic model that preceded it. This led to some Cherokee alumnae becoming graduates of universities across the United States and later businesswomen, educators, and even prominent physicians. I was also intrigued by examples of the curious ways in which students at the institution came to view their own (revised) history as citizens of the Cherokee Nation. The book left me wanting to know more, especially about the memoirs and journals and other extant firsthand accounts of student experiences at the seminary. The greatest strength of this book is its impressive documentation and citations, as well as generous appendices detailing the women who studied, graduated from, and/or taught at the institution. I read this for specific research purposes as well as for general information and enjoyment, and I was satisfied on all counts.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Malissa Chapin

    Good information.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jacquelyn

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kirbybrown

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Haworth

  10. 5 out of 5

    rhinda kesselring

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Saffin

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chanté

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amy Aldridge Sanford

  15. 4 out of 5

    David Nichols

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eli Baker

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Allen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Wamble white eagle

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mary Alice

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ivan Carbajal

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kate Granruth

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kera

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ellison Darling

  25. 4 out of 5

    ᎪᎳᏄ Ia

  26. 5 out of 5

    McPhaul M.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leah

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeff A. Bowles

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

  30. 5 out of 5

    ~Brandy~

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