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Thutmose III: The Military Biography of Egypt's Greatest Warrior King

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In the course of his thirty-two-year reign over ancient Egypt, Thutmose III fought an impressive seventeen campaigns. He fought more battles over a longer period of time and experienced more victories than Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar did. Despite Thutmose III’s surprisingly illustrious record, his name does not command the same immediate recognition as these high In the course of his thirty-two-year reign over ancient Egypt, Thutmose III fought an impressive seventeen campaigns. He fought more battles over a longer period of time and experienced more victories than Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar did. Despite Thutmose III’s surprisingly illustrious record, his name does not command the same immediate recognition as these highly visible military leaders. In Thutmose III, Richard Gabriel deftly brings to life the character and ability of ancient Egypt’s warrior king and sheds light on Thutmose’s key contributions to Egyptian history. Considered the father of the Egyptian navy, Thutmose created the first combat navy in the ancient world and built an enormous shipyard near Memphis to construct troop, horse, and supply transports to support his campaigns in Syria and Iraq. He also reformed the army, establishing a reliable conscript base, creating a professional officer corps, equipping it with modern weapons, and integrating chariotry’s combat arm into new tactical doctrines. Politically, he introduced strategic principles of national security that guided Egyptian diplomatic, commercial, and military policies for half a millennium and created the Egyptian empire. Through these crowning achievements, Thutmose set into motion events that shaped and influenced the Levant and Egypt for the next four hundred years. His reign can be regarded as a watershed in the military and imperial history of the entire eastern Mediterranean.


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In the course of his thirty-two-year reign over ancient Egypt, Thutmose III fought an impressive seventeen campaigns. He fought more battles over a longer period of time and experienced more victories than Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar did. Despite Thutmose III’s surprisingly illustrious record, his name does not command the same immediate recognition as these high In the course of his thirty-two-year reign over ancient Egypt, Thutmose III fought an impressive seventeen campaigns. He fought more battles over a longer period of time and experienced more victories than Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar did. Despite Thutmose III’s surprisingly illustrious record, his name does not command the same immediate recognition as these highly visible military leaders. In Thutmose III, Richard Gabriel deftly brings to life the character and ability of ancient Egypt’s warrior king and sheds light on Thutmose’s key contributions to Egyptian history. Considered the father of the Egyptian navy, Thutmose created the first combat navy in the ancient world and built an enormous shipyard near Memphis to construct troop, horse, and supply transports to support his campaigns in Syria and Iraq. He also reformed the army, establishing a reliable conscript base, creating a professional officer corps, equipping it with modern weapons, and integrating chariotry’s combat arm into new tactical doctrines. Politically, he introduced strategic principles of national security that guided Egyptian diplomatic, commercial, and military policies for half a millennium and created the Egyptian empire. Through these crowning achievements, Thutmose set into motion events that shaped and influenced the Levant and Egypt for the next four hundred years. His reign can be regarded as a watershed in the military and imperial history of the entire eastern Mediterranean.

30 review for Thutmose III: The Military Biography of Egypt's Greatest Warrior King

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I have a passing interest in Thutmose III, mainly because he has a pretty statue and I can be incredibly shallow, so I got this book to see if I could further my interest in one of Egypt's greatest but underrated pharaohs. Well, the book was a disappointment. The problem isn't that the book wasn't informative (which it was) or that it was biased to one view. But rather, what I wanted from a book about Thutmose III wasn't what Gabriel wanted to write about. As the full title of the book suggests, I have a passing interest in Thutmose III, mainly because he has a pretty statue and I can be incredibly shallow, so I got this book to see if I could further my interest in one of Egypt's greatest but underrated pharaohs. Well, the book was a disappointment. The problem isn't that the book wasn't informative (which it was) or that it was biased to one view. But rather, what I wanted from a book about Thutmose III wasn't what Gabriel wanted to write about. As the full title of the book suggests, this is a military biography, and apart from the first chapter, focused entirely on Thutmose's military exploits. Dubbed the "Napoleon of Ancient Egypt" and compared favourably to the likes of Alexander the Great, Thutmose III was one of the greatest warrior kings in Ancient Egyptian history – but Thutmose was far more than just a military leader. It would have been nice to have seen more than a few lines about Thutmose when he wasn't at war. But then, the book is pretty clear about its scope and I only have myself to blame for expecting more from it. The book is also inaccurate in some places, and I disliked how Gabriel consistently labelled Hatshepsut as "Queen" when she ruled as a king. The tone came across as dry in places, and I found myself dozing off in places. It's unfortunate that this is the most accessible of the biographies about Thutmose III.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tony Selhorst

    In “Thutmose III: The Military Biography of Egypt's Greatest Warrior King”, Richard Gabriel deducts Thutmose’s military strategy and operational art, by describing the campaigns he conducted to expand the sphere of influence of Egypt, to punish adversaries, or to subdue an insurgency. Gabriel describes in detail the many joint naval-army ventures into Canaan and beyond, nowadays Lebanon and Syria, and a few military adventures in Nubia, nowadays Sudan. Although an easy and informative read, the In “Thutmose III: The Military Biography of Egypt's Greatest Warrior King”, Richard Gabriel deducts Thutmose’s military strategy and operational art, by describing the campaigns he conducted to expand the sphere of influence of Egypt, to punish adversaries, or to subdue an insurgency. Gabriel describes in detail the many joint naval-army ventures into Canaan and beyond, nowadays Lebanon and Syria, and a few military adventures in Nubia, nowadays Sudan. Although an easy and informative read, the deduction of operational art and military strategy from – sometimes even presumed - military actions, based on incomplete archives, with current day knowledge on warfare, and in current day terms is a bit problematic for historians. Great story though!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Meru

    One of the better books I've ever read of this sort, this book managed to be both very readable and pretty interesting, even to someone who doesn't have that much interest in Egypt. More books should be written like this, since they make otherwise inaccessible topics worth reading about. One of the better books I've ever read of this sort, this book managed to be both very readable and pretty interesting, even to someone who doesn't have that much interest in Egypt. More books should be written like this, since they make otherwise inaccessible topics worth reading about.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Taylor

  5. 5 out of 5

    Luqdah

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gene Morris

  7. 4 out of 5

    Avril

  8. 4 out of 5

    Zeyad El

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jo Morris

  10. 4 out of 5

    Edward

  11. 4 out of 5

    Denis

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steven Nix

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Sisson

  14. 5 out of 5

    أحمد شريف

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mario Fabrizio Polinelli

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kamal Shariff

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mirna Mahmoud

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tom Marvolo

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dayle

  20. 5 out of 5

    Smeagol9

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  22. 5 out of 5

    'Aussie Rick'

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Noun

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mathew White

  25. 4 out of 5

    Doc

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sebastien

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alaa magdy

  29. 5 out of 5

    von Gollum

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pierre Allain

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