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Countdown: Based on the DC Comics Series

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The explosive novelization of the events that followed the cataclysm of Infinite Crisis. Cosmic legend has it that when the primordial gods of antiquity perished in some bygone cataclysm, the universe gave birth to a new breed of gods who reigned from two eternally warring worlds, the heavenly New Genesis and the hellish Apokolips. Now, a vast conspiracy of evil is determin The explosive novelization of the events that followed the cataclysm of Infinite Crisis. Cosmic legend has it that when the primordial gods of antiquity perished in some bygone cataclysm, the universe gave birth to a new breed of gods who reigned from two eternally warring worlds, the heavenly New Genesis and the hellish Apokolips. Now, a vast conspiracy of evil is determined to eradicate the New Gods, stealing their souls to wield universal power that can destroy all of reality. At the end of an age in which time, space, and reality may bow before such sinister forces, the fate of the Earth lies in the hands of five unlikely super heroes who have one destiny to fulfill: to save the world at all costs, regardless of the consequences.


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The explosive novelization of the events that followed the cataclysm of Infinite Crisis. Cosmic legend has it that when the primordial gods of antiquity perished in some bygone cataclysm, the universe gave birth to a new breed of gods who reigned from two eternally warring worlds, the heavenly New Genesis and the hellish Apokolips. Now, a vast conspiracy of evil is determin The explosive novelization of the events that followed the cataclysm of Infinite Crisis. Cosmic legend has it that when the primordial gods of antiquity perished in some bygone cataclysm, the universe gave birth to a new breed of gods who reigned from two eternally warring worlds, the heavenly New Genesis and the hellish Apokolips. Now, a vast conspiracy of evil is determined to eradicate the New Gods, stealing their souls to wield universal power that can destroy all of reality. At the end of an age in which time, space, and reality may bow before such sinister forces, the fate of the Earth lies in the hands of five unlikely super heroes who have one destiny to fulfill: to save the world at all costs, regardless of the consequences.

30 review for Countdown: Based on the DC Comics Series

  1. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    Of the three novelizations I have read written by the author, I think this was the weakest of the three for me. I only read the first quarter or so of the comics, so I vaguely remember some of what is described in the book. I know he had to really thin down the series to be able to novelize it like he did; it makes me wonder what he cut out and "how good" (or "bad) the entire series would be. There were parts that I liked/enjoyed, for the most part (view spoiler)[mostly probably when the Monitor Of the three novelizations I have read written by the author, I think this was the weakest of the three for me. I only read the first quarter or so of the comics, so I vaguely remember some of what is described in the book. I know he had to really thin down the series to be able to novelize it like he did; it makes me wonder what he cut out and "how good" (or "bad) the entire series would be. There were parts that I liked/enjoyed, for the most part (view spoiler)[mostly probably when the Monitor, Donna Troy, and Jason Todd traveled through the multiverses looking for Ray Palmer, although I seem to remember Ryan Choi (the "new" Atom) and Kyle Chandler also traveling with the group, but I could be wrong (hide spoiler)] . There were parts I wasn't too fond of (view spoiler)[specifically, I never cared for how Mary Marvel was treated in the beginning of the series, and that carried over to how she was written/treated in this book as well (hide spoiler)] . The character development was so-so; again, hard to do when based on a comic series, but there were some "good moments" in the book as well. DC has done enough "retcons/reboots" since this series, though, that nothing of consequence truly happened in this book (that I am aware of; I had drifted away from reading DC Comics regularly by the time this series came out). (view spoiler)[I found myself laughing at Black Adam's response to Mary Marvel's appearance after he gave her his powers as well as those of Isis (or was it Osiris?). The powers caused her to transform into "an adult woman" as opposed to the "teenage girl" when transformed by Shazam's powers. It was almost like he "noticed her for the first time" "now" that she appeared as "an adult" like her brother, Billy, and not as a young, underage teenage girl. Granted, I also thought his rebuking her like he did at the end was also amusing, too. Never mind that he supposedly gave her "all of his power(s)" in the beginning of the book and was now "human forevermore," only to have gained his powers back by the end of the novel, but his response to her wanting to form a "new Black Marvel family" with him was actually unexpected. I would have assumed he would have "gone for it" to spite Billy Batson, the one-and-only Captain Marvel, but he chastises her and sends her away, saying she is still a child and needs to grow up. Yet, he was briefly sorrowful at the beginning when he gave her his powers; why the change of heart and mind and attitude? Did he expect her "to grow up and mature", somehow, after giving her his powers when he either knew or had some kind of inkling what would happen to her (as evidenced by his telling her to tell Billy he was sorry for what he did to her by giving her his powers)? Speaking of which, it is funny to me that Dick Grayson is an adult, now, while Billy Batson is still a teenager. Or, that Barbara Gordon is also an adult whereas Mary Batson is also a teenager. What's up with that? Why wouldn't the Batson twins be adults, now? It's goofy, how some characters remain "eternally young" whereas others age and mature. I mean, Batman has (had) a son, Damien, who is in his early teens, for Pete's sake! When are the writers at DC going to let the Batson twins grow up and mature into adults as well? Especially if Captain Marvel can share Shazam's powers with others like what was shown in the movie? Or how Billy was able to share his powers with Mary AND Freddie Freeman? I also found Jimmy Olson's brief "romance" with Forager to be amusing and entertaining as well. The book was entertaining, for the most part; it held my interest, but it really felt like something was missing. Like some kind of "heart-and-soul" had not been included in the book. I don't know if the 'fact' that it starts at "week 39" is part of that reason or not; I was always under the impression that each issue was supposed to be "the next week" (like in 52), but that cannot be the case, based on how some of the chapters take place one-after-the-other, especially the last four or five chapters. I thought it was crap how Mary Marvel was treated by the other "heroes," how she had been in a coma for weeks and then came out of it, alone, with nobody "there for her" or waiting for her. I also thought it was crap that Billy, of all people, wasn't there for her or able to take the time to help her, somehow, as she recovered. Speaking of which, for being in a coma for as long as she was, she had a remarkable "recovery time!" She recovered in no time at all! It was garbage that nobody would listen to her or show her any kind of empathy. She had been abandoned and was struggling with it, yet she kept getting dumped on by all of the "go-gooders"? I felt like the way Mary's story was written was forced and mechanical and utterly bogus; there should have been more support for her, especially what with her being in a coma for as long as she was. That, and her "fall from grace." I don't know if some kind of point was being made about how 'power corrupts' and Black Adam's power in conjunction with Isis's power corrupted her absolutely, but it was poorly written, poorly done. At the same time, I am sure it is hard to write such a fall from grace in a convincing fashion, because the reader can "see" what is happening and how it is adversely affecting the character, but in reality the person who is falling from grace often is truly blind to what is happening to them and the consequences of his or her decision(s). I just felt that it was a blatant move to "change her character" or mix things up with her by having her "friends and family" act so out-of-character regarding her and their varied relationships. I "hated" how nobody showed her any kind of support or asked her how she was doing, after having been in a coma for as long as she was. I hated that she was ostracized and ignored and then judged and condemned by so many "heroes" and friends after being abandoned by the "heroic community," the very people she should have been able to rely upon to be there for her. Granted, it was also interesting to read about how much of a "crutch" her having powers had become for her; that was an interesting take on her having lost her powers like she did. Other than his relationship with Forager, Jimmy Olsen's story arc was a giant "meh" to me. I really didn't care about his character or what happened to him. He's never really bothered me before, in the comics, so I can only assume it has to do with the way he was written in the series and then translated into the novelized format? I loved that Donna Troy kicked the crap out of Superwoman, Ultraman's wife. That was pretty awesome! I could have done without the whole "Holly and Harleen" storyline; Harley Quinn's never been a character I have been fond of, so it was a wasted arc for me. Granted, the book does explain that her powers and abilities were beefed up a bit by Poison Ivy, so there is that. The "Amazon Arc" was a giant "meh" for me as well; granted, I figured it would be some Terran villains in charge and not Granny Goodness of Apokolips. At the same time, it was important because of the part Mary Marvel (Batson) plays in the latter part of the book, so it does make sense for it to have been included. It was just a bit odd, that with some of the various events occurring throughout the book that more of DC's "big heroes" were not in the book. Especially with all that was happening with Jimmy Olson, one would have expected Superman to be a bit more interested in what was happening to his "Pal." There are some "cameos" scattered throughout the book, but not as much as one might think there would have been. Also, having "normal humans" on Apokolips didn't fit very well, either, considering what some of them went through and survived despite having no powers. Which reminds me - Mary Marvel used Jason Todd's body to bludgeon Donna Troy practically to unconsciousness (if not death) after Darkseid restored to her the "dark" powers she lost while fighting Eclipso earlier in the book. Either Jason Todd has some level of invulnerability, or he should have been dead, after the amount of bodily harm inflicted upon him by being used as a bludgeon against Donna Troy. His head strikes hers multiple times, yet he comes away with contusions and a headache, maybe a concussion. Really? Really??!? Made no sense whatsoever. I did like the part describing Ray Palmer inside Jimmy Olsen's head, poking around his brain (he actually has one!) because of the advanced alien circuitry attached to Olsen's brain. I also liked when he finds the "crystal" that held the spirits of the dead New Gods, which he crushes so that they can rejoin "the Source" and in order to deny Darkseid their powers/abilities/strengths. Definitely one of the better moments in the book. I also liked how Ray, Donna, and Forager became "Guardians" of the Monitors, because, after all, "who watches the watchmen?" (hide spoiler)] Best part of the book? (view spoiler)[Darkseid DIES at the end! (hide spoiler)] Worst part of the book? (view spoiler)[Darkseid's death means nothing, because he is somehow "resurrected" only to die again at the end of Final Crisis and, I am sure, is somehow resurrected again after that death . . . (hide spoiler)] I will probably rate the book as 2.4 - 2.6 stars, rounded down to 2 stars. As much as I enjoyed reading it, it felt like a huge chunk of its "core material" was missing that might have made the story "better" (even if it would have increased the size of the book). I didn't mind some of the characters it focused on; that was an interesting change of pace. I just didn't like the sense of "it could have been so much more!" after I finished it. Hopefully I can find a copy of Final Crisis relatively soon, so I can "finish" this "series."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Another one of those books that had sat on my shelf for a few years...grabbed it because I saw that it had Jason Todd among other notable sidekicks. Jason unfortunately is barely to be found in the book, even in the scenes where they say he is. To be honest, this is a Jimmy Olsen and Mary Marvel book. The Mary Marvel parts are far more interesting and the all of the Jimmy scenes drag beyond belief. They also try to shoehorn a Holly Robinson/Harley Quinn type story in there which is decent but ne Another one of those books that had sat on my shelf for a few years...grabbed it because I saw that it had Jason Todd among other notable sidekicks. Jason unfortunately is barely to be found in the book, even in the scenes where they say he is. To be honest, this is a Jimmy Olsen and Mary Marvel book. The Mary Marvel parts are far more interesting and the all of the Jimmy scenes drag beyond belief. They also try to shoehorn a Holly Robinson/Harley Quinn type story in there which is decent but never gets anywhere (but the ending does leave us to wonder a few things). All in all, despite it reading like a recap and not a book, it's slightly above average. It suffers (as I would imagine many 52 issue comic books condensed into a book) from being overly broad and not focused enough on a central story. It comes together, but its a bumpy road along the way.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cynik

    OK for kids.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Eriss

    I liked the read only because of the Mary Marvel parts. Everything else didn't hold my interest as much. Mary Marvel's part of the story is the most interesting. Having read the comic counterpart to this storyline, it was just fun to re-experience her fall from grace in novelized form. (view spoiler)[I have always loved Mary's little interaction with Black Adam. It was such a humanizing moment for Black Adam, and it was cool to see him treat Mary almost like an uncle would. (hide spoiler)] Holly I liked the read only because of the Mary Marvel parts. Everything else didn't hold my interest as much. Mary Marvel's part of the story is the most interesting. Having read the comic counterpart to this storyline, it was just fun to re-experience her fall from grace in novelized form. (view spoiler)[I have always loved Mary's little interaction with Black Adam. It was such a humanizing moment for Black Adam, and it was cool to see him treat Mary almost like an uncle would. (hide spoiler)] Holly Robinson's and Jimmy Olsen's parts were my least favorite. Jimmy's part in particular just felt unbelievable, and he struggled to maintain the same amount of relevancy as the other characters. Stop trying to make Jimmy Olsen cool, dang it! He's not, and I don't care if he ever will be!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Edward Johnson

    This was the first book I picked up at a train station by Greg Cox. I knew nothing about what the story was about, as I don't usually read current comics because they tend to be more sensational than focused on weaving a good yarn of a story than they used to be. Continuity, especially, is not necessary for a story to be told anymore. It seems that no one tries that hard to make their stories make any sense in the grand scheme of whatever company they work for. That having been said, I ended up This was the first book I picked up at a train station by Greg Cox. I knew nothing about what the story was about, as I don't usually read current comics because they tend to be more sensational than focused on weaving a good yarn of a story than they used to be. Continuity, especially, is not necessary for a story to be told anymore. It seems that no one tries that hard to make their stories make any sense in the grand scheme of whatever company they work for. That having been said, I ended up picking up a book focused on one of the more famous of continuity-ignoring storylines in comic book history, CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS. Rather this time, it was a sequel to the INFINITE CRISIS and prequel to the FINAL CRISIS. Go figure. It would be diverting in the least, I told myself. It was, after all, going to be a long wait for the delayed train to take me home. What harm could i do to indulge in a CRISIS-infested story? That was the question I asked myself when I cracked it open and began reading. Now keep in mind that one of my favorite all-time things in comic books has to be the New Gods, created by comic book legend writer and artist Jack Kirby. It was a creation of his that when it came out was hardly treated with the respect or kudos it deserved for setting new standards and pushing the envelope as to what kind of stories that could be told in comic books. Plus, these comics had a mythic quality about them. Very archetypical. YEARS in advance of the first Star Wars movies, but very similar in the way it told its story. Just to have it said, Darkseid is way cooler to me than Darth Vader ever could be as a villain...even when I read the comics in my childhood. He was a villain that you could believe who would go to any extreme just to end up the winner. Which was why COUNTDOWN had me pleasantly surprised, because the New Gods were featured in it and were written as they should be. They were written as I remembered them. Greg Cox captured Kirby in his writing. And for me, it only got better. Greg Cox turned out to make this fairly forgettable story into something worth my time and effort reading it. He crafted it into something I cared about. He wove it into something bigger, you just got that feeling. I started to not care about the CRISIS tie-in. The way the story was being told helped me get over that and reach a place that appreciated the wild and way-out story that was being told in a way that I could believe Kirby would have told it. It was a very welcome surprise for a book I didn't expect much out of in a train station. Would I recommend this book to everyone? While you might think that I would, I wouldn't foist this kind of storytelling on just anyone. I would ask a reader if they appreciated Jack Kirby and his style from and contributions to the comic book industry. If the answer is yes, then I would whole-heartedly recommend it. If the answer was no, then I wouldn't even bring up the book or how much it changed my view on what DC Comics was doing with its company as of late. It is one of those books that you would either "get" or be left confused why someone would concetrate so much effort in crafting the intricately woven story to apparently nowhere. I personally appreciate it, its style and the way Greg Cox could make me care about stories that if I pickedup the comic book would not turn me on in the slightest. His style of writing is subtle and understated, but it draws the reader into a world that is fun to explore and hints that it is infintely bigger than suggested. All this is expressed often simultaneously in COUNTDOWN. I loved it. Perhaps you would, too? I will leave that entirely up to you to decide.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jim C

    A book that takes place in the DC universe. While this one has appearances from the well known characters like Superman and the Joker, this one is an adventure that concerns sidekicks. There are several different story lines that weaves into one and the one story line is Darkseid is behind it all. One story line is Jimmy Olsen has gained new powers and he has no idea how. Another is Mary Marvel has lost hers and is searching for help. The third story is Holly Robinson is fleeing from Gotham and A book that takes place in the DC universe. While this one has appearances from the well known characters like Superman and the Joker, this one is an adventure that concerns sidekicks. There are several different story lines that weaves into one and the one story line is Darkseid is behind it all. One story line is Jimmy Olsen has gained new powers and he has no idea how. Another is Mary Marvel has lost hers and is searching for help. The third story is Holly Robinson is fleeing from Gotham and the final one is Jason Todd and Donna Troy is recruited to search for the Atom who is missing. I am not a die hard DC fan and I believe this is a hindrance in reading this novel. I had to look up online who these characters were. After I did this, I had no problem with the story. Only two out of the four story lines kept my interest. Mary Marvel and her quest for power and how she is seduced by it was my favorite. I liked Holly's story as she teams up with Harley Quinn and I laughed out loud with this "buddy cop" team up. The other two are vital to the story but I was never engaged by them. Why the four star rating then? I used the GraphicAudio rendition of this story and it was incredible. They employ different actors, sound affects, and a musical score. They put out a top notch product and they could probably make the yellow pages interesting. This novel would probably be more enjoyed by die-hard fans of DC. The casual fan might be a little confused by the characters but the story is easy to follow. Do yourself a favor and get the audiobook. It makes it so much better and you won't even notice the unfamiliarity of the characters. You will be so engrossed by the action and the story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    Countdown is an adaptation of a comic book DC published weekly from 2007 to 2008. Fans knew it best as the second such weekly, after 52, and hoped it would be a comparable experience. And in some aspects, it was, just not the ones Greg Cox decided to include in his novelization. Cox is a hindrance to the book in more than one regard. Any semblance of literary appeal is dropped instantly in his prosaic style. This is a comic book story that as a result reads exactly like the stereotype would sugge Countdown is an adaptation of a comic book DC published weekly from 2007 to 2008. Fans knew it best as the second such weekly, after 52, and hoped it would be a comparable experience. And in some aspects, it was, just not the ones Greg Cox decided to include in his novelization. Cox is a hindrance to the book in more than one regard. Any semblance of literary appeal is dropped instantly in his prosaic style. This is a comic book story that as a result reads exactly like the stereotype would suggest, and shouldn't interest serious readers who have reached beyond young adult levels. Which is not to say it's incompetent, but that it's hard to take seriously if you want something other than overly descriptive passages and happen to enjoy, you know, nuance. This is superheroes basically sent straight back to the era where everyone spoke in exclamation points. Just skip this version. It'll sour you as quickly as its comic book counterpart soured other readers, but this time with every justification.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Krisi Amey

    I liked this story. I know many weren't pleased with it because it seemed like a sidekick convention, but honestly that was probably one of my favorite things about the story itself. Also, I got to listen to the story done by Graphic Audio. If you're a fan of comics and you haven't checked them out - I strongly recommend it. Graphic Audio does full cast audio with sound effects and everything. They can take a story that's "not bad" and make it sound amazing. I don't know if I would have liked th I liked this story. I know many weren't pleased with it because it seemed like a sidekick convention, but honestly that was probably one of my favorite things about the story itself. Also, I got to listen to the story done by Graphic Audio. If you're a fan of comics and you haven't checked them out - I strongly recommend it. Graphic Audio does full cast audio with sound effects and everything. They can take a story that's "not bad" and make it sound amazing. I don't know if I would have liked this story as much if I had been reading it outright instead of listening to the audio. On the critical side, I didn't appreciate how stupid the creators chose to make Harly Quinn. The woman is Batshit crazy, no doubt, but she isn't stupid. She isn't "I'm sure there's a lot of words you don't know, Harley." The chick has a doctoral degree, for ----'s sake. P.S. Jason Todd is amazing and there is never enough of him.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lucas Swanger

    I couldn't make it 40 pages without wanting to throw this book across the room. I'm a comics fan, but there was a little too much 'inside baseball' for first-timers, though I'm not sure this was even meant for new fans. The tipping point for me came when a character's teleportation was described as (paraphrasing), "looking like the transporter effect from Star Trek." I couldn't make it 40 pages without wanting to throw this book across the room. I'm a comics fan, but there was a little too much 'inside baseball' for first-timers, though I'm not sure this was even meant for new fans. The tipping point for me came when a character's teleportation was described as (paraphrasing), "looking like the transporter effect from Star Trek."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris Villareal

    Hey, if you are planning on reading this book, I HIGHLY recommend it! This book is absolutely AWESOME!!! the stories and tails behind every character corrispond to those that everyone's heard. Superman, the Flash, Robin, Batman, Mary Marvel, Catwomen, you name IT! this book is absolutely a must read for any sci-fi, superhero fan. i give it a 5/5 Hey, if you are planning on reading this book, I HIGHLY recommend it! This book is absolutely AWESOME!!! the stories and tails behind every character corrispond to those that everyone's heard. Superman, the Flash, Robin, Batman, Mary Marvel, Catwomen, you name IT! this book is absolutely a must read for any sci-fi, superhero fan. i give it a 5/5

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jim Minteer

    The story was kind of all over the place and some of the main characters didn't get much of a resolution. If you really love Darkseid or some of the Teen Titans, then this is for you. Don't expect much from Superman, Batman or the rest of the Justice League. The story was kind of all over the place and some of the main characters didn't get much of a resolution. If you really love Darkseid or some of the Teen Titans, then this is for you. Don't expect much from Superman, Batman or the rest of the Justice League.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Woah. I've never really read much of comic-novel adaptations. This is actually the first one. But honestly? This was an exhilarating book. The only real downside in this book was Mary--she agitated the crap out of me. All in all though? Good book. I can't wait to read more of Cox's adaptations. Woah. I've never really read much of comic-novel adaptations. This is actually the first one. But honestly? This was an exhilarating book. The only real downside in this book was Mary--she agitated the crap out of me. All in all though? Good book. I can't wait to read more of Cox's adaptations.

  13. 4 out of 5

    John

    wow. really like Greg Cox's adaptations wow. really like Greg Cox's adaptations

  14. 5 out of 5

    Foggygirl

    fast paced, and an all round good read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul Harvey

    A little uneven at times, and a very condensed version of the story that unfolded in the comic books.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ian Crystal

    when is his next book...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carl

  18. 5 out of 5

    John

  19. 5 out of 5

    K

  20. 4 out of 5

    Álvaro

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Nelson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Derek Jordan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Victor Orozco

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ana

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Gantert

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Yackus

  27. 5 out of 5

    James

  28. 4 out of 5

  29. 5 out of 5

    Albert

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jim Morrison

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