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Tyrant: Funeral Games

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Satyrus and Melitta, twin heirs to a rich kingdom on the Black Sea, become desperate fugitives when their mother, the Scythian warrior-princess Srayanka, is cut down in a savage act of betrayal. Accompanied by their tutor, the Spartan Philokles, they must make a perilous journey west, pursued by ruthless assassins, to find sanctuary with the army of their father's closest Satyrus and Melitta, twin heirs to a rich kingdom on the Black Sea, become desperate fugitives when their mother, the Scythian warrior-princess Srayanka, is cut down in a savage act of betrayal. Accompanied by their tutor, the Spartan Philokles, they must make a perilous journey west, pursued by ruthless assassins, to find sanctuary with the army of their father's closest friend, Diodorus. But Diodorus is caught up in the tangled web of alliances, betrayals and intrigue that followed Alexander the Great's death, as his generals fought over the huge empire he had created - and soon the twins will have their first taste of real battle as two Macedonian warlords clash. In this violent and unstable world, they must chose sides carefully, as Antigonus One-Eye, and his brilliant son Demetrius, prepare to take on the might of Ptolemy's Egypt, and the forces gather for the biggest and most spectacular battle the world had ever seen - Gaza.. .


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Satyrus and Melitta, twin heirs to a rich kingdom on the Black Sea, become desperate fugitives when their mother, the Scythian warrior-princess Srayanka, is cut down in a savage act of betrayal. Accompanied by their tutor, the Spartan Philokles, they must make a perilous journey west, pursued by ruthless assassins, to find sanctuary with the army of their father's closest Satyrus and Melitta, twin heirs to a rich kingdom on the Black Sea, become desperate fugitives when their mother, the Scythian warrior-princess Srayanka, is cut down in a savage act of betrayal. Accompanied by their tutor, the Spartan Philokles, they must make a perilous journey west, pursued by ruthless assassins, to find sanctuary with the army of their father's closest friend, Diodorus. But Diodorus is caught up in the tangled web of alliances, betrayals and intrigue that followed Alexander the Great's death, as his generals fought over the huge empire he had created - and soon the twins will have their first taste of real battle as two Macedonian warlords clash. In this violent and unstable world, they must chose sides carefully, as Antigonus One-Eye, and his brilliant son Demetrius, prepare to take on the might of Ptolemy's Egypt, and the forces gather for the biggest and most spectacular battle the world had ever seen - Gaza.. .

30 review for Tyrant: Funeral Games

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

    Esta es la tercera parte, y debo decir que hasta ahora ha sido mi favorita. No haré ningún Spoiler, pero no imaginaba qué podía pasar después del final de la segunda parte, y la verdad es que este libro superó mis espectativas. ¡Muy bueno! El por qué tiene 4 estrellas y no 5 es porque el libro a veces se estira mucho. Para un libro de más de 600 páginas, no le vendría mal reducir unas 100 para quedar en 500 páginas. A veces se hacía un poco tedioso, pasaba por algunas lagunas, pero nada horrible, Esta es la tercera parte, y debo decir que hasta ahora ha sido mi favorita. No haré ningún Spoiler, pero no imaginaba qué podía pasar después del final de la segunda parte, y la verdad es que este libro superó mis espectativas. ¡Muy bueno! El por qué tiene 4 estrellas y no 5 es porque el libro a veces se estira mucho. Para un libro de más de 600 páginas, no le vendría mal reducir unas 100 para quedar en 500 páginas. A veces se hacía un poco tedioso, pasaba por algunas lagunas, pero nada horrible, la verdad. Las últimas 100 o 150 páginas del libro fue lo mejor según yo (lo mismo que con las dos partes anteriores de la saga). Me gustan los personajes, tanto los que venían de las entregas previas como de los que aparecen recién aquí. Me gustan los gemelos, hacen buena dupla. Y por último, quiero destacar la nota Cameron al decir que discrepa con algunos antecedentes históricos y su motivo por ello. Lo encontré bastante interesante. Libro totalmente recomendable, aunque un poco largo. Estoy muy ansioso de leer la parte 4. Veremos qué nuevas aventuras vienen.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Liviu

    Assuming you read the blurb so you have an idea about what the novel is about I strongly recommend this as even a better starting point than Tyrant 1 since it deals with the children of the heroes there, takes place some 12-3 years later and all needed back-story appears, while the novel is more exciting, lighter in some ways, much more adventure oriented and without the sense of doom that pervaded the first duology; I would not say it's YA despite that the main heroes start at 12 (twin girl/boy Assuming you read the blurb so you have an idea about what the novel is about I strongly recommend this as even a better starting point than Tyrant 1 since it deals with the children of the heroes there, takes place some 12-3 years later and all needed back-story appears, while the novel is more exciting, lighter in some ways, much more adventure oriented and without the sense of doom that pervaded the first duology; I would not say it's YA despite that the main heroes start at 12 (twin girl/boy) and it's really fun. The same compelling narrative, attention to detail and strong characters as in the original duology and a strong A, almost an A+ and the best of the series so far. I loved the Tyrant series and those two books I could not put down when I got them (plus all the qualities mentioned above - excellent research, pitch perfect 328 BC atmosphere, great characters, action, intrigue...)but the duology starting with the strong foreshadowing for its ending - foreshadowing that repeats, is amplified... quite a few times - was sometimes too "burdened" by that and I felt that overall it subtracted a bit from the appeal - maybe added some power, but not enough Here once we escape the foreshadowing, the new series - which may go 3 more - juts soars from the first pages and it's much more enjoyable; events are still brutal, main characters still get killed and there is no real wish-fulfillment either but I think the more adventure oriented narration benefits the new series a lot

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ned Lud

    Simple words like brilliant, remarkable, stupendous or sublime do not do this author’s work justice.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ozymandias

    It's not every day you find a series that kills its lead character off in book two and then continues on with his children. I have to say that since I knew this was a longer series I did not see that coming and assumed the heavy foreshadowing was wrong or at least referring to some future event. Well huh. This book is excellent and very human. Kineas was a likeable enough character but he was already well set in his ways when we met him. Satyrus and Melitta start off at about twelve here and we s It's not every day you find a series that kills its lead character off in book two and then continues on with his children. I have to say that since I knew this was a longer series I did not see that coming and assumed the heavy foreshadowing was wrong or at least referring to some future event. Well huh. This book is excellent and very human. Kineas was a likeable enough character but he was already well set in his ways when we met him. Satyrus and Melitta start off at about twelve here and we see them grow up from princes/ses into fugitives. That's a story that's rather easy to relate to. It also means we're less in military adventure mode and more in action/adventure. Two scions of royalty seeking to reclaim their throne. What's not to like? We also get to see more of Philokles and although he remains frustratingly enigmatic we do get enough inside info to see that he's a Pythagorean! No wonder he was kicked out of Sparta! But that still leaves so many questions unanswered, and by this point I don't think we're ever going to be told. The only issue I have with this book is the timing of it. First off, by skipping twelve years ahead of the last book we miss out on an awful lot of fun diadochi stuff - like Alexander's death and the initial splitting of his successors. Second, a bit less than halfway through we jump forward another four years and they go from being preteens to full teens. Not that I dislike the second period, it just felt like an unnecessary time jump since we basically resume the plot where we left off. It seems, in fact, that the only reason we followed them as preteens was so we could see the fate of Eumenes and the Silver Shields. Something interesting indeed, but rather thrown in and not plot essential. This book feels like it belongs in a separate series from the last one. Like the last two books formed a duology and this is a sequel series. But once you get used to that idea and the new tone it becomes a very engaging read. Cameron's one of the best writers of historical fiction out there and this is one of his most popular series. Strongly recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Robin Carter

    It really is easy to write a review for Christian's books..."Bloody Great...Go buy it". But if that's was all it took then why would we all bother doing this? None the less the statement is as accurate as can be, I have not read a single poorly phrased chapter, or paragraph the man has written. The period is very underwritten, so he has a chance to stand out and shine. I think his brilliance stems from his obvious Love of the period, he being a re-enactor as well as a writer, and I think that it's t It really is easy to write a review for Christian's books..."Bloody Great...Go buy it". But if that's was all it took then why would we all bother doing this? None the less the statement is as accurate as can be, I have not read a single poorly phrased chapter, or paragraph the man has written. The period is very underwritten, so he has a chance to stand out and shine. I think his brilliance stems from his obvious Love of the period, he being a re-enactor as well as a writer, and I think that it's this re-enactment passion and experiencing so much of what his characters would have gone through that makes the books come to life. If a man can really live and breathe his passion its Christian Cameron, and I feel privileged by the end of the book to have shared that experience. Because the passion shines through in every single character shaped with care attention and love, I don't know if they are based on people he knows and cares about, or just people he wishes he knew, but they are so well rounded they are alive by the time you have read the book, and any death is keenly felt. Read the book enjoy the ride. Experience the History (Parm)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sue Smith

    I don't know what made me pick up this book. I think I wanted some historical fiction and the inside cover story sounded good. It certainly didn't disappoint me, I did enjoy it immensely! I do wish I had started at the first of the series! I have a thing at starting a book with the first one! That being said, for starting in at the 3rd, I didn't feel like I had trully missed alot - the central characters being young and probably not part of the previous 2 book to any great extent. (I guess it's I don't know what made me pick up this book. I think I wanted some historical fiction and the inside cover story sounded good. It certainly didn't disappoint me, I did enjoy it immensely! I do wish I had started at the first of the series! I have a thing at starting a book with the first one! That being said, for starting in at the 3rd, I didn't feel like I had trully missed alot - the central characters being young and probably not part of the previous 2 book to any great extent. (I guess it's kind of like watching Star Wars without knowing the pre-quels!) It was well written and I felt it didn't exaggerate any circumstances or events. My biggest issue was keeping the names and the myraid of characters straight! I'm also thinking, that if I had had the first 2 books under my belt, I might have also had a better sense of the political chaos and economical urgencies that Christian Cameron tried to present in this story. Anyways, it was good none the less and I would recommend it as an entertaining read!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    c2010: FWFTB: kingdom, betrayal, perilous, assassins, sanctuary. Absolutely stirling writing, pace and characterisation. From my point of view, I found it harder to connect to the twins as much as I did to Kineas. However, that is more of a content/plot issue than any for of criticism. Philokles the Spartan continues to play a large role! Recommended. "But desperate men make poor choices. c2010: FWFTB: kingdom, betrayal, perilous, assassins, sanctuary. Absolutely stirling writing, pace and characterisation. From my point of view, I found it harder to connect to the twins as much as I did to Kineas. However, that is more of a content/plot issue than any for of criticism. Philokles the Spartan continues to play a large role! Recommended. "But desperate men make poor choices.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carlton

    I shed a few tears at the end. Great characters, great writing, great time period, great book!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Miguel Angel Pedrajas

    El último libro que he leído en este maldito 2020. Pero a su vez, un año lleno de oportunidades para disfrutar de la lectura y que ha sido más que fructífero en ese sentido. Y creo que con este libro de Christian Cameron no lo he podido terminar de mejor manera. Cameron ha conseguido crear una obra muy entretenida, interesante y con un ritmo apabullante. Podría decir que su saga “Tirano” es una epopeya grandiosa, en un momento histórico poco conocido, pero en el que la novela se encuentra cómoda El último libro que he leído en este maldito 2020. Pero a su vez, un año lleno de oportunidades para disfrutar de la lectura y que ha sido más que fructífero en ese sentido. Y creo que con este libro de Christian Cameron no lo he podido terminar de mejor manera. Cameron ha conseguido crear una obra muy entretenida, interesante y con un ritmo apabullante. Podría decir que su saga “Tirano” es una epopeya grandiosa, en un momento histórico poco conocido, pero en el que la novela se encuentra cómoda flirteando con personajes muy importantes y en los que nada está afianzado. Los giros argumentales, la evolución de los personajes, las escenas tan brutales y emocionantes que guardan las páginas de “Juegos funerarios” se quedarán para siempre. Como ya comenté en anteriores reseñas de la saga, llegué a ella buscando ese momento histórico tan belicoso como las guerras entre los sucesores del gran Alejando Magno, los diadocos. En las dos primeras novelas hay muy poco de eso, siendo la figura de Alejandro la de un antagonista lejano. En esta tercera novela, 12 años después de la anterior, estamos en los primeros momentos de esos “juegos funerarios” que disputan varios candidatos, pero principalmente cuatro de ellos. Aun así, ellos no serán los protagonistas. Los verdaderos protagonistas están atrapados en medio de unos y otros, siendo testigos y tomando posición según sus propias motivaciones. Y Cameron utiliza esa libertad para llevarnos por una odisea desafiante que cruza varias veces el Mediterráneo, nos lleva por varias batallas épicas, persecuciones frenéticas, conspiraciones, envenenamientos, política, secuestros, escenas navales de película… que deja poco tiempo para la calma. Cuando uno se ha dado cuenta, muy atrás quedaron los acontecimientos de pocas páginas anteriores y no puedes parar de leer. Hasta el momento, me parece la más rica e interesante de las tres primeras novelas de la saga. Y una cosa muy atractiva es que puede leerse perfectamente sin haber leído las anteriores. Aunque el lector se perderá el origen y el trasfondo de algunos personajes veteranos y la historia que hay detrás de ellos. Y eso yo no me lo perdonaría. Porque algunos de estos personajes nos abandonarán para siempre y, solo conociendo sus vidas, entenderemos el gran drama y dolor que supone su pérdida, teniendo momentos sumamente emocionantes. Abro este pequeño párrafo de SPOILERS (sáltatelo si quieres leer esta novela): (view spoiler)[Uno se pregunta al concluir la novela anterior (Tirano: Tormenta de Flechas), cómo puede continuar la saga tras la muerte de su protagonista y héroe: Kineas. Y es que la trama continua justo 12 años después, con una dramática escena nada más empezar y que lleva a conocer y seguir las vidas de Sátiro y Melita, los mellizos de Kineas y Srayanka. Ellos serán los nuevos protagonistas, veremos cómo se van convirtiendo de niños a adultos pasando por mil y una situaciones. Lo vemos reflejado en los títulos de los seis actos que componen la novela, que referencian el forjado de una espada. Y poco a poco, nos daremos cuenta que son una evolución reconocible de los caracteres de sus padres, la viva imagen de sus miedos, su carisma y su fuerza. Contarán con aliados como los antiguos amigos y compañeros de su padre, destacando a Filocles, el espartano filósofo, que se convierte definitivamente en un personaje importantísimo para esta novela y la saga en general. (hide spoiler)] Una novela muy recomendable, divertida, entrañable y emocionante. Ideal para los ávidos de novela histórica antigua y de la acción, de personajes carismáticos y que disfruten con escenas épicas. Cameron tiene buen ritmo y espero poder disfrutándolo en el resto de novelas de la saga.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Clay Kallam

    I stumbled into this six-book series by way of one of my favorite recent fantasy series, the Traitor Son Cycle by Miles Cameron. I noticed that, for some unknown reason, Cameron also wrote under the name of Christian Cameron, and had a series set in the time of Alexander the Great. As one who knows way too much about that Hellenistic time period, and one who loved Cameron’s previous work, I was all in from the moment I started volume one, Tyrant. And as this is a connected series that really need I stumbled into this six-book series by way of one of my favorite recent fantasy series, the Traitor Son Cycle by Miles Cameron. I noticed that, for some unknown reason, Cameron also wrote under the name of Christian Cameron, and had a series set in the time of Alexander the Great. As one who knows way too much about that Hellenistic time period, and one who loved Cameron’s previous work, I was all in from the moment I started volume one, Tyrant. And as this is a connected series that really needs to be read in order to be appreciated, this review is of all six books considered as a whole, rather than a review of each book (though parenthetical notes will be appended for each). The story covers about 30 years of ancient history, ending in 301 BCE at the Battle of Ipsos. Now if you already know who won the Battle of Ipsos, you will be a little too far ahead of the game, for much of the suspense of the series (which includes other historical events) will be lost – and you will also be surprised by some revisions Cameron makes in order to tell the story the way he wants to. But the basic premise is this: Cameron inserts fictional, high-ranking characters into the complicated weave of Hellenistic history, and has them participate in events both major and minor. For the most part, this works extremely well, as Cameron’s grasp of the minutiae of Hellenistic life and his gritty sense of the bloody, painful and horrific cost of ancient warfare is superb. He is also an excellent writer, so the story moves along at a brisk pace, flagging only momentarily in the later volumes. There are issues, of course. Like Star Trek, Kineas and Satyrus, the two main protagonists, are in the front lines way too often to be believed, especially in the later books, and their interactions with the major historical figures seem unnecessary, as if the editors insisted that somehow Kineas and Alexander are in contact, and so are Satyrus and various Hellenistic leaders. Cameron, though, is perfectly willing to kill off major characters, and in sudden and unexpected ways, which adds a tremendous amount of tension to battle scenes and assassination attempts (unlike Star Trek). There’s also some magical realism thrown in, but any attempt to explain the plot would require much more patience than any reader of this review is likely to have. But in short, Kineas, Satyrus and his woefully underutilized twin sister Melitta (why wasn’t she more prominent in the narrative?), all represent what we now consider Southern Russia, at the north of what we call the Black Sea. In those times, it was the place where the steppe nomads and expanding population of farmers and colonizers crossed paths, and it became a crucial part of the Hellenistic game of thrones given its ability to produce grain that the Mediterranean cities desperately needed to feed their people. So Cameron tosses these characters, their soldiers and their grain into the Hellenistic mix, and in the end, comes up with a wonderful series that I enjoyed from start to finish. Then again, I love excellent historical fiction, and this is my favorite period, so I’m hardly unbiased. But I will say this: If you have even a passing interest in the world of Alexander the Great after his death, the Tyrant series is for you. I just wish there were more than six volumes. * * * * * This volume is a serious shift of gears, and as such, takes time to build momentum. And new characters come onto center stage, and the suspension of disbelief they bring with them asks a lot. But Cameron settles back into the flow by book's end.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Clemens Schoonderwoert

    This exciting and astonishing novel is the 3rd volume of the thrilling and impressive Tyrant series. Once more the book has been historically very well researched and described in the author's and historical note at the end of the book, and not to forget you will find great maps and a well defined glossary at the beginning of the book as well. The storytelling is as usual of a top-notch quality, for the author has certainly the ability to bring in his own wonderful and entertaining fashion vividly This exciting and astonishing novel is the 3rd volume of the thrilling and impressive Tyrant series. Once more the book has been historically very well researched and described in the author's and historical note at the end of the book, and not to forget you will find great maps and a well defined glossary at the beginning of the book as well. The storytelling is as usual of a top-notch quality, for the author has certainly the ability to bring in his own wonderful and entertaining fashion vividly to life the brutal and beautiful Ancient Greek world. This book starts off in the year 316 BC, twelve years after the death of Kineas of Athens at his kurgan on the Tanais River, until the year of 312 BC. In this year 316 BC we find the twins Melitta and Satyrus with their mother Srayanka and their tutor Philokles the Spartan at their father's kurgan, when Srayanka announces that she has to make a jouyrney to meet Heron/Eumeles, and with Ataelus at her side and some of their best warriors she sets off to meet him, but when she arrives there she's ambushed by this same Heron/Eumeles and an unkown Athenian and finally murdered. What should also have been achieved by Heron/Eumeles, The Greek Boy, and this Athenian is the murder of the twins Melitta and Satyrus, but Ataelus manages to escape with his warriors to warn the twins and Philokles the Spartan of the immediate danger to their lives. Melitta and Satyrus with Philokles the Spartan have to flee west with assassins on their heels in the hope to reach the safe haven of Ptolemy's Alexandria, and hope to find sanctuary there amidst a growing storm of violence and fighting. What will follow is a gripping and intriguing tale of treachery, plots and counter-plots, where Melitta and Satyrus have to choose wisely who their friends and/or enemies are, and that same story will build towards one final monumental confrontation between Antigonus One-Eye and his son Demetrius against the formidable Ptolemy of Egypt at the spectacular Battle of Gaza. Highly recommended, for this is "An Astounding Historical Tale"!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kirk Macleod

    Continuing to work my way through a list of Ancient Greece in 36 Historical novels, I hit #32, Christian Cameron's 2010 novel Tyrant: Funeral Games. This was actually the first time in the entire list where I was being asked to read volume three in a series, so of course I quickly read one and two. Tyrant Mini-Review This 2008 novel follows a Greek mercenary called Kinneas and his interactions with the Scythian people during the reign of Alexander the Great. The book was a lot of fun, showing a li Continuing to work my way through a list of Ancient Greece in 36 Historical novels, I hit #32, Christian Cameron's 2010 novel Tyrant: Funeral Games. This was actually the first time in the entire list where I was being asked to read volume three in a series, so of course I quickly read one and two. Tyrant Mini-Review This 2008 novel follows a Greek mercenary called Kinneas and his interactions with the Scythian people during the reign of Alexander the Great. The book was a lot of fun, showing a little known corner of the era. Tyrant: Storm of Arrows Mini-Review This 2009 novel follows Greek mercenary Kinneas and his battle with a Macedonian army led by one Alexander the Great's generals. A lot of action, as well as an interesting look at Alexander himself in the latter days of his reign. Ok, so back to Funeral Games. The novel follows the children of the leads from the first two books as they navigate the collapsing Macedonian Empire after Alexander's death. Twins Satyrus and Melitta begin the novel around age twelve and allow the reader to examine how nobles from different cultures viewed gender, roles, and responsibilities against a backdrop of action, intrigue, and adventure. I think it's fair to say that this list very nicely led me to two great authors, Mary Renault and Christian Cameron.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    Well written story with interesting young heroes but 1. the actual wars were so complex, it was impossible to follow what was happening in the big picture 2. I always go on about maps being essential to understand what is going on. This book actually included a map of the eastern Mediterranean but most of the places mentioned in the story were missing so it did not help.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jose Carlos

    Toda la saga Tirano es muy buena. En este vemos la transición entre una historia anterior y la que sigue, entre una generación y su sucesora, y es una transición muy bien llevada por el autor. Extrañamos a algunos personajes, nos vamos encariñando con otros y convertimos a unos terceros en leyendas. Un buen (gran) nuevo impulso a la historia, recomendable.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I have to be honest, the idea of 12-year-old warriors seemed a bit far-fetched to start with, but it gets more plausible as the book goes on and the twins age. It can be a bit confusing keeping track of who is who from the previous books in the series, but I remembered the key players which is the main thing. Overall, it's a decent read. I have to be honest, the idea of 12-year-old warriors seemed a bit far-fetched to start with, but it gets more plausible as the book goes on and the twins age. It can be a bit confusing keeping track of who is who from the previous books in the series, but I remembered the key players which is the main thing. Overall, it's a decent read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Erv Reyes

    El cambio de protagonistas no le sentó bien a la serie y el ritmo trepidante que intenta inyectar al inicio le fue imposible sostenerlo por el frágil desarrollo de varios de los personajes que introduce en esta tercer entrega.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Satyrus and Melitta seek refuge in Egypt as the succession to Alexander heats up.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dean

    Everything Cameron writes is always great!!! This book and series is as well great, recommend this author to anyone, depending on the historical period he is writing about.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michal

    Ok, this was a bit painful. Couple of times I got to the point that I wanted to stop reading the book and start with something else. I liked the setting, and some of the author's insights in the use of different military strategies were really great. I also liked the portrayal of the early Alexandrian society, with the hesitant adoption of some of the values of a Greek polis. What I didn't like were some of the characters, especially the female lead was more and more annoying. I do buy that wome Ok, this was a bit painful. Couple of times I got to the point that I wanted to stop reading the book and start with something else. I liked the setting, and some of the author's insights in the use of different military strategies were really great. I also liked the portrayal of the early Alexandrian society, with the hesitant adoption of some of the values of a Greek polis. What I didn't like were some of the characters, especially the female lead was more and more annoying. I do buy that women could be effective warriors at that time (even though a bit hesitantly), what I do not buy is that it would happen by them doing everything the same way like men. I can see that being lighter, they could be better horse(wo)men (the term seems a bit sexist), and having less brute power their military training would probably take the direction towards archery, which could make them superior in accuracy. What I do not buy is that they could shoot to the same (or longer) distance as men. For women to become equivalent or in some aspects superior warriors would require them to adopt strategies (or technologies) that would counter the men's higher strength. One way to partially solve this problem would be to use poisonous arrows. They did appear once in the book, but it was an exception, not a rule. But even here, I think it would be quite a huge advantage to be able to shoot poisonous arrows from a distance, while being out of range of the opponents. Other way could probably be night fighting, but even here I can see that only a direction in an early training would cause this advantage. Once such strategy would prove to be successful there would be a pressure for men to adopt it and again, I would expect the biological differences in terms of strength etc. would decide. I mean unless there was some religious reason for the division of roles (which again did not appear in the book). Therefore I would still side with the historians claiming that the armor and weapons in the graves of Scythian women were symbols of high status and not of the fact that they were actual fighting troops. I am not a reenactor (but I hope to be in the future) so I might be wrong about these things. In any case, I do not think that Christian Cameron made a good case for the women warriors. I should also point out that I was listening to an audio version of the book so perhaps I missed some details that would explain the problems I just described. To conclude this brief review, the female lead was not annoying because of the fact that she was a warrior, but rather because of her personality. I know that some emotional disturbances are expected from teenage character, but I just could not find a way to actually like her. Overall, the book had a pace that made me annoyed with reading it but then it would pick up for a while, so I continued reading. Eventually I have finished the book only just in case I decide to read some of the other books in the series. Right now it's weak 3 stars, but I think I might change my opinion in the future when I have a bit of a distance...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro Garzón

    Sin lugar a dudas la serie Tirano de Cameron es de las mejores que he leído en lo referente a novela histórica!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris Wray

    Definitely the weakest of the series so far, but worth a read having already read the first two. Strengths: The setting, during the wars of succession between Alexander the Greats companions is fascinating, and Cameron captures the instability of the times excellently. His action and battle scenes are also realistic and memorable, and well written rather than relying on shock and gore. The characterisation is generally strong, with Philokles and Stratokles particularly standing out as realistic a Definitely the weakest of the series so far, but worth a read having already read the first two. Strengths: The setting, during the wars of succession between Alexander the Greats companions is fascinating, and Cameron captures the instability of the times excellently. His action and battle scenes are also realistic and memorable, and well written rather than relying on shock and gore. The characterisation is generally strong, with Philokles and Stratokles particularly standing out as realistic and interesting. The highly educated soldier who has been broken by his experience of war, and the amoral political schemer only concerned for the interests of his own city (and ultimately himself), fit well with the setting but also resonated for today. Good historical fiction should develop characters that feel realistic in their own context, while also showing that some characteristics are universal to people from all eras. Generally, Cameron does this well. Weaknesses: Kineas was such a compelling and well developed lead character in the first two books that it was always going to be difficult for his children to take over in this book. The twins struck me at times as a little too much like modern teenagers, and in some parts it was too much of a predictable "coming of age" story. The language was also unnecessarily crude in parts, which rankled with me a bit. I don't remember this as a feature in the first two in the series. Overall, I had mixed feelings with this book as it felt a little bit like a bridge between Kineas in the first two books and whatever happens with the twins in the rest of the series. Generally well written and exciting, so I enjoyed it but not as much as the earlier books in the series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mangieto

    Es un muy buen libro, aunque cambia un poco de tono respecto a los libros anteriores. Aquí la historia transcurre en un mundo roto luego de la muerte de Alejandro Magno, pero no sólo eso, si no que además se centra en Sátiro y Melita, apenas unos niños cuando todo comienza. En ese sentido éste libro no me atrapó tanto como esperaba, porque es una trama más lenta y no pude interesarme por la trayectoria de los hijos de Kineas. Tal vez porque, a pesar de que son los "narradores", en sí sólo son cen Es un muy buen libro, aunque cambia un poco de tono respecto a los libros anteriores. Aquí la historia transcurre en un mundo roto luego de la muerte de Alejandro Magno, pero no sólo eso, si no que además se centra en Sátiro y Melita, apenas unos niños cuando todo comienza. En ese sentido éste libro no me atrapó tanto como esperaba, porque es una trama más lenta y no pude interesarme por la trayectoria de los hijos de Kineas. Tal vez porque, a pesar de que son los "narradores", en sí sólo son centros de un par de intrigas, pero no los verdaderos protagonistas de los hechos. También ha pasado tiempo desde el final del libro anterior y gran parte del libro se va en esa transición. Lo considero más una entrada para las aventuras de los gemelos y una especie de cierre al mundo en el que conocimos a Kineas. A pesar de todo, creo que es una novela muy bien realizada y sigo pensando que Christian Cameron tiene mucho talento.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Cougler

    This book was a great find in the ship's library as I was sailing the Mediterranean Sea and I always like reading a book set where I am visiting. This is the first of Christian Cameron's Tyrant series I've read but it won't be the last. Well-paced, the plot is beautifully driven by the teen-aged brother and sister characters whose mother has been ruthlessly removed from her throne, causing them to flee for their lives. Their coming of age takes place in battles and brawls on their journey to the This book was a great find in the ship's library as I was sailing the Mediterranean Sea and I always like reading a book set where I am visiting. This is the first of Christian Cameron's Tyrant series I've read but it won't be the last. Well-paced, the plot is beautifully driven by the teen-aged brother and sister characters whose mother has been ruthlessly removed from her throne, causing them to flee for their lives. Their coming of age takes place in battles and brawls on their journey to the safety of their father's friend, Diodorus. The battle scenes are so detailed I felt I was watching from a hillside and had to be careful not to be trampled by huge stallions or impaled by errant spears. I did find the many names a lot to keep straight but this is a small criticism in this outstanding book. Now I must find the others in this series!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

    Quite a good book actually. The first two books in the series were good but I never found myself wondering when I was going to pick up the next one. I'm glad I continued to read on, though. Apart from all the historical novel side, which is great in itself, I especially love how Christian explores how two young children come to age while surrounded by warfare. As in the other books, Christian seems to be asking deeper questions than what the storyline apparently is telling us. Quite a good book actually. The first two books in the series were good but I never found myself wondering when I was going to pick up the next one. I'm glad I continued to read on, though. Apart from all the historical novel side, which is great in itself, I especially love how Christian explores how two young children come to age while surrounded by warfare. As in the other books, Christian seems to be asking deeper questions than what the storyline apparently is telling us.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Margareth8537

    We see Kineas' twins as they grow up and have to face plots to take over their state. The politics of Alexander's heirs was very complicated and although Cameron tries to simplify it, you are never sure who is fighting who. But that is probably what it was like at the time Enjoyable and fast moving We see Kineas' twins as they grow up and have to face plots to take over their state. The politics of Alexander's heirs was very complicated and although Cameron tries to simplify it, you are never sure who is fighting who. But that is probably what it was like at the time Enjoyable and fast moving

  26. 5 out of 5

    nigel jones

    Great Historical Story This was a fabulous read with some great characters and a seriously great chase across deserts rivers and mountains. Loved the descriptions of the battles. Am looking forward to reading the next book in the series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cristian

    ¡Muy buen libro!. Los dos primeros de la serie tuvieron mucha más fantasía de la esperada con los sueños de Kineas. Sin embargo, este es ¡perfecto!. Me gusta mucho cómo se involucran personajes como Pitágoras o a los sofistas.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I was afraid this would be a Young Adult book, at first. And, without the main characters are in their teens, this is far from a YA book. Lots of action, lots of history. Lots of everything. An excellent book by an excellent author, who really knows his stuff

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ron Decaigny

    Simply the best writer in this genre period. My only issue is how hard to get these titles are. they should be much more available and read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Warren

    i really enjoyed this book love the tyrant series cant wait to start the next

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