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Saddam Hussein: A Biography

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In July 1979, Saddam Hussein became the President of Iraq. His dictum was simply expressed--power through terror. During the first decade of his presidency, Saddam engaged in three wars: the Iran-Iraq War, the invasion of Kuwait, and the Gulf War of 1991. After September 11th, the war on terrorism led to the war against Iraq that began in March 2003 and the eventual captur In July 1979, Saddam Hussein became the President of Iraq. His dictum was simply expressed--power through terror. During the first decade of his presidency, Saddam engaged in three wars: the Iran-Iraq War, the invasion of Kuwait, and the Gulf War of 1991. After September 11th, the war on terrorism led to the war against Iraq that began in March 2003 and the eventual capture of Sadddam Hussein effecitively ending his rule over the Iraqi people. On April 9, 2003, a handful of U.S. Marines helped a small crowd of Iraqis gathered in Firdos Square to tear down a statue of Saddam Hussein. Since his capture, Saddam has been transferred to Iraqi legal custody and awaits his trial for atrocities committed during his regime. This biography details Saddam's difficult childhood in Tikrit and his politically influential teenage years in Baghdad with his uncle. His involvement with the Iraqi Ba'ath Party led to his participation in an assassination attempt on then Prime Minister Qassem. In his early political life, Saddam retained the lessons of village life learned in his difficult Tikrit childhood, but they would become enmeshed with his discovery of Ba'athism and pan-Arabism. Once he became President of Iraq, Saddam often ruled with force and a carefully cultivated image throughout the use of visual imagery and books. Though Saddam no longer rules Iraq, the legacy of his reign will likely shape Iraqi history for years to come.


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In July 1979, Saddam Hussein became the President of Iraq. His dictum was simply expressed--power through terror. During the first decade of his presidency, Saddam engaged in three wars: the Iran-Iraq War, the invasion of Kuwait, and the Gulf War of 1991. After September 11th, the war on terrorism led to the war against Iraq that began in March 2003 and the eventual captur In July 1979, Saddam Hussein became the President of Iraq. His dictum was simply expressed--power through terror. During the first decade of his presidency, Saddam engaged in three wars: the Iran-Iraq War, the invasion of Kuwait, and the Gulf War of 1991. After September 11th, the war on terrorism led to the war against Iraq that began in March 2003 and the eventual capture of Sadddam Hussein effecitively ending his rule over the Iraqi people. On April 9, 2003, a handful of U.S. Marines helped a small crowd of Iraqis gathered in Firdos Square to tear down a statue of Saddam Hussein. Since his capture, Saddam has been transferred to Iraqi legal custody and awaits his trial for atrocities committed during his regime. This biography details Saddam's difficult childhood in Tikrit and his politically influential teenage years in Baghdad with his uncle. His involvement with the Iraqi Ba'ath Party led to his participation in an assassination attempt on then Prime Minister Qassem. In his early political life, Saddam retained the lessons of village life learned in his difficult Tikrit childhood, but they would become enmeshed with his discovery of Ba'athism and pan-Arabism. Once he became President of Iraq, Saddam often ruled with force and a carefully cultivated image throughout the use of visual imagery and books. Though Saddam no longer rules Iraq, the legacy of his reign will likely shape Iraqi history for years to come.

47 review for Saddam Hussein: A Biography

  1. 5 out of 5

    Omar

    We unfortunately live in a world where everything is biased and impossible to understand from a clear perspective. Everything is edited or changed to fit one's agenda. Luckily, there are still a few beacons of hope to seek truth within, from a completely unbiased perspective. A great example of this would be the book "Saddam Hussein: A biography" by Shiva Balaghi. Controversial topics like Saddam Hussein and his rise and fall require tons and tons of research before discussing, or even riskier, pu We unfortunately live in a world where everything is biased and impossible to understand from a clear perspective. Everything is edited or changed to fit one's agenda. Luckily, there are still a few beacons of hope to seek truth within, from a completely unbiased perspective. A great example of this would be the book "Saddam Hussein: A biography" by Shiva Balaghi. Controversial topics like Saddam Hussein and his rise and fall require tons and tons of research before discussing, or even riskier, publishing a book about. This book does exactly that. It somehow defies the laws of physics of our modern world by managing to be unbiased and factual when talking about a world leader. It clearly describes Saddam's childhood, his rise and fall, his decisions, his wars, the casualties, his foreign relations, and his motive, with no exaggeration whatsoever. Regarding his motives, the book has a really interesting analysis of them and it was the best topic mentioned in the book to me. Throughout the book it states that everyone depicted Saddam as a man who liked the idea of power through terror. As a teen and young adult, Saddam was extremely politically active and would participate in wild riots and massive protests, siding with the Ba'ath Party. By the age of 22 he would gather on the streets of Mosul with other protesters to attend the attempted assassination of Abdul-Karim al Qasim, the prime minister at the time. Moving on to his early regime, he would still represent that motive and oversee the mass hangings and executions of so-called "enemies" led by the Ba'athists. I loved this part of the book because it really showed how deep down, like many other middle eastern leaders, had an unquenchable craving or desire for power, where anything would be done with no boundaries just to maintain or gain power. Another absorbing and fascinating analysis would be how Saddam used Imagery to spread his motives and empower his people. A great example would be where he called the Iran-Iraq War "Qadisiyyat Saddam" picturing it as the battle of Qadisiyyah where the Persians in the Sassanid empire were embarrassingly defeated by Arab Muslims from the Rashidun Caliphate back in the 7th century. This leads to my favorite quote being said where Balaghi states, “While Saddam wears a modern day military uniform, his shadow is depicted wearing an early Islamic helmet and cape.” I love this quote so much because it describes how Saddam's regime will reshape Islamic history for years to come and Saddam will be taught about as frequently as events such as Qadisiyya in schools, etc. It was an incredible reading experience and it is now one of my favorite biographies ever written, as it isn't just a biography, it's more! It teaches and shows many other things such as Iraq before and after it burnt to ashes, specifically Iraq in Saddam's childhood, and during Saddam's early and late regime. It made me realize why leaders who took action in the Iraq War, such as former British prime minister Tony Blair, now regret the execution of Hussein, but at the same time, why others, such as former U.S president George W. Bush, justify his death. They way the book describes Iraq's economy and relations make it seem like a heaven on earth for the Middle East, as it's oil industry was booming and Saddam was strengthening ties with foreign nations. The book states that Iraqi diplomat Tariq Aziz said, "Saddam Hussein was chairman of the planning council in charge of development... and our ambition was to turn Iraq into a very, very developed country, with industry, services, technology, and education." This was to be done with the great oil revenue. Yet throughout the end of his regime, Saddam would make quick and risky decisions under pressure from many nations and his own starving people, leading to nations opposing him and considering his regime "evil", and, of course, his execution. It also briefly talked about the U.S foreign policy and world affairs. The only flaw I have noticed about the book is that sometimes it is almost too detailed. That might seem like a good thing, but at a point things start to jumble up and go on top of each other, making some parts of the book very confusing. It's almost as if the author interrupts the last topic she was writing about and just proceeds to talk about another topic out of the blue once she remembers it. Other than that, I can conclude that it is an amazing book and I recommend it to anyone interested in Middle Eastern Politics, or to anyone who feels he is being lied to about this certain topic and wants the clear, unbiased life story of Saddam Hussein.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jared

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A documentary of Saddam Hessian's life from when he was young to when he got older and eventually caught. Started reading Saddam Hussein a biography because I wanted to see his side of the story about the gulf wars and what his childhood was like. I found the book in Ela class while looking at the library's website and I read the description and I decided to go ahead and get the book. The author of the book did a good job with it and the author was Shiva Balaghi It starts off as him being in Tar A documentary of Saddam Hessian's life from when he was young to when he got older and eventually caught. Started reading Saddam Hussein a biography because I wanted to see his side of the story about the gulf wars and what his childhood was like. I found the book in Ela class while looking at the library's website and I read the description and I decided to go ahead and get the book. The author of the book did a good job with it and the author was Shiva Balaghi It starts off as him being in Tarkit as a very young boy and having a very good bond to his mother because he lost his father when he was young and eventually he started referencing himself to the profit muhhamed Ali when he got a little older and as a child he was forced to work in the fields and he had to do that for a little while and eventually Saddam went to school where him and his teacher when he was fourteen years old got into an argument over something and Saddam was gonna try to kill his teacher but ended up failing. Soon neuff after that he ended up going in to politics and eventually to Iraq leader/ president and that is when he started talking about cutting relationships with the USA because he started becoming friends with the communist Russians and Saddam wanted to be a communist ruler but the Americans don't like communism so that is why he was going to cut relations to the USA and he is gonna to end up using the cold war to his advantage so he can take over the oil industry they are and will only sell their oil to the Asians not the USA and the reason he does that is he sees Britain and the USA hostile people. Because of this it ends up snowballing into the gulf war and it was just more of him seeing the USA as hostile people and so they keep on fighting about it and soon after that Iran and the USA decide to get into fighting at Kuwit and Saddam made a speech saying he would harm nay incoming us troops on January 15 1991 and after Saddam said that the USA decide they were gonna use explosives so they brought 110,000 tons of explosives and they ended up using 85,000 tons of explosives.After that happened Saddam immediately signed a peace treaty the next day and Saddam lost 150,000 men to those bombings. Saddam didn't like it and still hated the USA but eventually the Iranes ended up losing the war to the US and Saddam ended up leaving his people with mixed messages after that and eventually most of his citizens started hating him. Also Saddam Hussein wanted to be put on everything they're country rebuilt and eventually Saddam even built a tower with a massive statue of him next to it and eventually Saddam got kicked out of power in his country and was criticizing the council of Iraq and he kept telling his people to fight for him while on the run from the USA and he would leak stuff to the media after a little while. The US wanted him so badly they put a 25 million dollar reward on his head and they didn't care if he was dead or alive and they eventually caught him by catching his friends and then he killed himself in jail before his trial . My personal opinion on the ending of the book was it as good to know he was dead because he was a very bad person that didn't really care about his people and he only cared about being the leader of his people and beating the Americans in the war.He basically made his country worse off by having bad relation to the USA and then we went back they're later in the early 2000's after 911 and what made the terrorist stay there was almost all the people they are hated the USA in Iraq because of the bad relationship that Saddam left behind and people lost family members because of him and US troops lost their lives because of them. So I think it was a good thing he is dead so he can't cause any more harm and for suppressing his people . And my favorite quote from the book was “Hussein’s army had suffered 150,000 casualties and another 50,000 solders had been taken prisoner of war by coalition forces.” I would recommend anyone this book who likes to learn about America's past wars or if they like wars in general and are interested in previous wars and I would also recommend it to veterans who served overseas to see what they're enemy was like. Some other books like this one would be No Easy Day by Kevin Maurer and Matt Bissonnette and Crusade: The Untold Story of the Persian Gulf War by Rick Atkinson and another book that is like this is Gassed in the Gulf by Patrick G. Eddington and Those are the books that I recommend to people that liked the Saddam Hussein book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tom Hartmann

  4. 4 out of 5

    Raili

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rocks

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karenna

  7. 5 out of 5

    Utkarsh Vijay

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mike Richardson

  9. 5 out of 5

    Asser Elfeky

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ángel Meléndez

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christos

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mary Yang

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Hannay

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mohammed Malcomx

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

  17. 4 out of 5

    Linda Keremian. LK

  18. 5 out of 5

    Logan Culver

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mikhayla Gracey

  20. 4 out of 5

    LM

  21. 5 out of 5

    Parantunu

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jithin Joseph

  23. 4 out of 5

    Santosh

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rand

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jakubabyja Mariusza Januszagudja Maryja Liszewska Liszewicz

  27. 5 out of 5

    Czarodzieja Ksieznicza Czarownica Czalinecza Niewolnica Krolowa Wroblewska Afganistan Pakistan Iran Libia Egypt

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mohamed Farah

  29. 5 out of 5

    Don Deezy

  30. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  31. 5 out of 5

    ❀ Hana

  32. 4 out of 5

    Nasrul

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  34. 5 out of 5

    Shane

  35. 5 out of 5

    Jason Manford

  36. 5 out of 5

    Tehreema Alam

  37. 5 out of 5

    Anil Kumar

  38. 5 out of 5

    Graeme Yule

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jakubabyja Mariusza Januszagudja Maryja Liszewska Liszewicz

  40. 4 out of 5

    Czarodzieja Ksieznicza Czarownica Czalinecza Niewolnica Krolowa Wroblewska Afganistan Pakistan Iran Libia Egypt

  41. 5 out of 5

    Loki

  42. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  43. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine Hawkins

  44. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Siddiqui

  45. 4 out of 5

    Intrepid86

  46. 4 out of 5

    Lucie

  47. 5 out of 5

    Alex Davis

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