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Big Book of Horror

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Collected together for the first time are the original Little Book of Horror stories. This collection features three classic tales of terror - Frankenstein, War of the Worlds and Dracula - retold by Steve Niles and accompanied with beautiful full-color art by Scott Morse, Ted McKeever and Richard Sala.


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Collected together for the first time are the original Little Book of Horror stories. This collection features three classic tales of terror - Frankenstein, War of the Worlds and Dracula - retold by Steve Niles and accompanied with beautiful full-color art by Scott Morse, Ted McKeever and Richard Sala.

30 review for Big Book of Horror

  1. 5 out of 5

    John

    I was expecting a "Classics Illustrated" approach here, but instead I got more of a cross between Cliffs Notes and a children's book. Writer Steve Niles presents the stories in bare-bones minimalist form, usually only a paragraph or two per page, accompanied by a beautifully done two-page spread illustration. The most effective and evocative of the original work was "The War of the Worlds" which retained Wells's narrative style and was presented with amazingly chilling art by Ted McKeever. My wo I was expecting a "Classics Illustrated" approach here, but instead I got more of a cross between Cliffs Notes and a children's book. Writer Steve Niles presents the stories in bare-bones minimalist form, usually only a paragraph or two per page, accompanied by a beautifully done two-page spread illustration. The most effective and evocative of the original work was "The War of the Worlds" which retained Wells's narrative style and was presented with amazingly chilling art by Ted McKeever. My wonder is, who is this book intended for? With the exception of the "Dracula" segment," it's probably far too intense and abstract for most younger kids, and the approach is too much like a kids' book for adults, who would probably prefer the original novels.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    The art was the best thing about this. The versions of the 3 stories (Frankenstein, War of the Worlds, Dracula) were way too short here. Good for children, not older people like me who have seen/read many versions of the presented stories.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nick Johnson

    This is a great collection for young readers interested in monster stories, for their first taste of the real guts of the tales. The art is beautiful, and the telling of each story provide a great children’s book summary. It’s like little golden books versions of classic terrors.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    Basically a children's book version of three classic stories. Having read all of the originals in all their 19th-century epistolary meandering, I can say that I have no problem with abridging/adapting the stories. However, these go so far as to lose the point of the originals without adding much in the way of interpretation or artistic license. The prose is obviously written for children, and I'm not just being haughty. For example, this is a line with punctuation intact: "Then Dracula bared his Basically a children's book version of three classic stories. Having read all of the originals in all their 19th-century epistolary meandering, I can say that I have no problem with abridging/adapting the stories. However, these go so far as to lose the point of the originals without adding much in the way of interpretation or artistic license. The prose is obviously written for children, and I'm not just being haughty. For example, this is a line with punctuation intact: "Then Dracula bared his pointy fangs and knelt down beside the sleeping Mina and bit her, bit her hard, right in the neck, and sucked her blood!" It's distracting, almost silly. The "Frankenstein" adaptation looses any element of gothic horror or existential dread due to the text and the "Dexter's Laboratory"-style art. "Dracula" is closer to the Universal Studios movie version than the book, though the changes to the end may actually improve the pacing of the story (seriously, the last 50-100 pages of the Bram Stoker version really drag on). "The War of the Worlds" is the most successful adaptation both in art and script, possibly because the source material is also the closest to modern narrative sensibilities. I got this as part of my Comics Bento box, which is nice because I can consider it a free gift. I may pass it along to an early reader who might enjoy it more than I did.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stacey M

    Big Book of Horror by Steve Niles, Scott Morse, Ted McKeever, and Richard Sala This is a collection of three classic stories. It includes retellings of Frankenstein, War of the Worlds, and Dracula. I have read all three books and know the stories and I had some problems with the retellings og these stories. Now I gave the book three stars overall. I enjoyed it, but that was due to the illustrations. The art in this book is delightful. I loved the visual representations the artists created. The wr Big Book of Horror by Steve Niles, Scott Morse, Ted McKeever, and Richard Sala This is a collection of three classic stories. It includes retellings of Frankenstein, War of the Worlds, and Dracula. I have read all three books and know the stories and I had some problems with the retellings og these stories. Now I gave the book three stars overall. I enjoyed it, but that was due to the illustrations. The art in this book is delightful. I loved the visual representations the artists created. The writing in this book left much to be desired. I don't think the author truly got the feel or ideas of these stories accurately and effectively. I think it is worth reading for the art, but the written portion isn't anything to write home about.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Dilcox

    This graphic novel has Steve Niles adapt three very well known tales, Frankenstein, War of the Worlds, and Dracula. The stories are stripped done and simply told which quite a few reviewers on this site ripped into, but I enjoyed it because the real purpose of this graphic novel was the beautiful paintings. The prose was honestly just an accessory to some truly fantastic art work. The story reads more like captions at times and that is fine by me. Plus we all know the stories.

  7. 4 out of 5

    John

    Scott Morse, Ted McKeever and Richard Sala all turn in some of the most astounding, amazing artwork of their careers (or possibly anyone else's). Wish I could say the same about Steve Niles' scripts. Skip the words and just look at the pretty pictures. Scott Morse, Ted McKeever and Richard Sala all turn in some of the most astounding, amazing artwork of their careers (or possibly anyone else's). Wish I could say the same about Steve Niles' scripts. Skip the words and just look at the pretty pictures.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    Horror,Anthology

  9. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nix Nevermore

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Spaulding

  12. 5 out of 5

    Thim Sagefjord

  13. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ruiz Willis

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  16. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cj Irvin

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Hooyberghs

  19. 5 out of 5

    Steven

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Middleton

  21. 5 out of 5

    Frans

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Gentilcore

  23. 4 out of 5

    Reese

  24. 5 out of 5

    DotsV

  25. 4 out of 5

    Evan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scoop

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

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