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Nameless Cults: The Complete Cthulhu Mythos Fiction of Robert E. Howard

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Robert E. Howard is the world-renowned author of the Conan series and the stories that were the basis of the recent Kull movie. He also was one of H.P. Lovecraft's frequent correspondents, and an author of many pivotal Mythos tales. This book collects together all of Howard's Mythos tales, including the tales that originated Gol-Goroth, Unausspreclichen Kulten, and Friedri Robert E. Howard is the world-renowned author of the Conan series and the stories that were the basis of the recent Kull movie. He also was one of H.P. Lovecraft's frequent correspondents, and an author of many pivotal Mythos tales. This book collects together all of Howard's Mythos tales, including the tales that originated Gol-Goroth, Unausspreclichen Kulten, and Friedrich Von Junzt. Included in this collections are several fragments left behind by Robert E. Howard which have been completed by a variety of authors. This book has been long anticipated by readers of H.P. Lovecraft and Call of Cthulhu players alike.


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Robert E. Howard is the world-renowned author of the Conan series and the stories that were the basis of the recent Kull movie. He also was one of H.P. Lovecraft's frequent correspondents, and an author of many pivotal Mythos tales. This book collects together all of Howard's Mythos tales, including the tales that originated Gol-Goroth, Unausspreclichen Kulten, and Friedri Robert E. Howard is the world-renowned author of the Conan series and the stories that were the basis of the recent Kull movie. He also was one of H.P. Lovecraft's frequent correspondents, and an author of many pivotal Mythos tales. This book collects together all of Howard's Mythos tales, including the tales that originated Gol-Goroth, Unausspreclichen Kulten, and Friedrich Von Junzt. Included in this collections are several fragments left behind by Robert E. Howard which have been completed by a variety of authors. This book has been long anticipated by readers of H.P. Lovecraft and Call of Cthulhu players alike.

30 review for Nameless Cults: The Complete Cthulhu Mythos Fiction of Robert E. Howard

  1. 5 out of 5

    John

    Chaosium collection of Robert E. Howard stories. Some of the stories are only tenuously connected to the Mythos. There are a few dogs in here, literally in the case of The Hoofed Thing which is a Lovecraft story where the hero punches the monster in the face instead of fainting. That said there are a lot of stand out stories in here and Price does his usual good job of putting the stories in context and connecting them with their influences. 12/8/2012 - The Black Stone - Robert E. Howard - Namel Chaosium collection of Robert E. Howard stories. Some of the stories are only tenuously connected to the Mythos. There are a few dogs in here, literally in the case of The Hoofed Thing which is a Lovecraft story where the hero punches the monster in the face instead of fainting. That said there are a lot of stand out stories in here and Price does his usual good job of putting the stories in context and connecting them with their influences. 12/8/2012 - The Black Stone - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults A man investigates a tall black spindly monolith somewhere in Hungary. The poet Justin Geoffrey supposedly got inspiration for The People of the Monolith there. Man goes to sleep and has a lucid dream of an ancient sacrificial rite which ends with a toad like being perched on the top of the monolith. Man figures ancient event and realizes that the old Turks must have imprisoned the creature. Worms of the Earth - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults, (Bran Mak Morn: The Last King) Bran Mac Morn story. The king of the Picts takes revenge on the Romans for a brutal crucifixion by summoning the little people. The little people are a degenerate race of underground dwellers who were put down by the Picts. The Little People - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults A reworking of The Shining Pyramid where the hero saves the girl. People of the Dark - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults A man vying for the love of a woman resolves to kill his competition in a haunted cave. The cave itself is a callback to Worms of Earth (Dagon's Cave). While exploring, the man falls and is knocked unconscious. In his dream he is an Irish raider suspiciously named Conan who desires a Briton woman. The woman is defended by her lover and the two run into the cave. Conan chases the two into the cave and comes in contact with either degenerate Picts or the even more degenerate Little People who pre-date the Picts. Chase ensues, the two men join forces and the couple die rather be killed by creeps. The man wakes up in time to see the woman of his desires and her lover appear in the cave. A replay of the ancient events ensues revealing the three are reincarnations of Conan and the Britons. New Conan does the honorable thing. The Children of the Night - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults Another reincarnation dream where a bunch of amateur scholars (including Kirowan) are hanging around drinking whiskey and soda and yammering about ancient races. They mention the "Bran cult" a callback to Bran Mac Morn. Again a guy goes unconscious and in his dream he realizes that one of the men is a descendant of the Little People and he himself is a descendant of the Picts or Celts their ancient enemy. He wakes up and vows to kill the man after an unsuccessful attempt to throttle him. The Thing on the Roof - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults Very much an HPL style tale where a guy helps another, weirder guy get hold of Nameless Cults, the legendary Black Book of von Juntz. Blah blah. Weird guy comes back from foreign travels, friend visits and hears hoof-like sounds upstairs. Weird friend apparently brought something back with him and is killed for his trouble. The Abbey - Robert E. Howard and C.J. Henderson - Nameless Cults Funky time jump where a guy is checking out an old abbey then realizes he's gone back in time. Freaky monk from the past tries to capture the guy, Little People again, guy triumphs. There's a toad god thing in the pool. Written from a Howard fragment. The Fire of Asshurbanipal - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults Pulp adventure tale about an Indiana Jones type named Steve Clarney and his loyal Afghan partner (sahib!). They hear about a magnificent jewel called the Fire of Asshurbanipal and chase it down to a lost city in the desert. Naturally, Arab brigands who turn out to be led by a rival happen along to take the jewel once the white guy finds it. Fight ensues, Steve is defeated and the Arab takes the jewel. The temple's unspeakable guardian shows up and deals with the problem. Steve and the Afghan leave alive but empty handed. Of the two versions of this story, this is the Mythos version. The Door to the World - Robert E. Howard and Joseph S. Pulver - Nameless Cults William Hope Hodgson style story about a guy who is transported to fairy land while enjoying a quiet evening in his library. A little touch of John Carter as the man wants to go back rather than stay in our world. The Hoofed Thing - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults Amusing tale of a guy and his weird neighbor. The plot builds as cats, then dogs, then small children and homeless people start disappearing. The weird neighbor summoned something and was keeping it in the second floor of his house Whately style. When the neighbor kidnaps the hero's girl friend the hero goes across the street and in true Howard style, punches the creature in the face. Featuring Bozo the heroic bulldog who was preceded by Bozo the less than heroic Maltese cat. Dig Me no Grave - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults Freaky guy dies leaving instructions for his one friend to perform. The friend seeks out Kirowan (see Children of the Night), who helps him follow the ritual. Apparently the guy sold his soul, blah blah. Some weird Arab shows up to make sure things are done right. Story was better than it sounds. Freaky guy was 300 years old, the ritual completed, soul claimed, house burned down. The House in the Oaks - Robert E. Howard and August Derleth - Nameless Cults Cool story about an abandoned house in New England which is apparently a doorway to other space and time. Kind of a House on the Borderland thing. This story goes into some detail as to why Justin Geoffrey was insane. The Black Bear Bites - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults "Chinamen" plot sedition and anarchy while our hero sneaks about and listens in. Takes place in China and suggests parallels with the Boxer Rebellion, etc. Damn this guy is a racist. The Shadow Kingdom - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults King Kull story as he joins forces with the hated Picts to root out evil in Valusia. Kull is conveniently king of Valusia at the time. The evil turns out to be serpent people who pre-date the humans in Valusia by a million years give or take. Kull keeps his throne but is forever on the lookout for the serpent men who can take human form. 12/24/2012 - The Gods of Bal-Sagoth - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults Turlogh O'Brien tale where he and his pal the Saxon Athelstane find themselves shipwrecked on a mysterious island after a Viking attack. There they meet Brunhild, a beautiful Norse woman who was revered as a goddess on the island until a local sorcerer decided otherwise. The two rescue the girl and return her to power. Naturally that doesn't go well as the sorcerer strikes back and his ancient thing kills lots people. Total anarchy ensues as civil war break out and the island is attacked by a thousand red indians. There's even an ape assassin! Turlogh and Athelstane ultimately quit the island only to be rescued by Spaniards (?!?) who are on their way to slaughter Moslem pirates. Ridiculous plot; loved every minute of it. I sense a sequel. 12/26/2012 - Skull Face - Robert E. Howard - Nameless Cults A novella really about Steve Costigan suffering as a hash addict after WWI. He falls into the clutches of Kathulos, a reputed Egyptian, but actually an Atlantean, who is masterminding a plot to overthrow white people. Kind of a Fu Manchu story with Mythos overtones. Fun pulp thriller material with only tenuous ties to the Mythos. I thought Black Bear Bites was racist; this is white vs. the world in this story. 12/26/2012 - Black Aeons - Robert E. Howard and Robert M. Price - Nameless Cults Allison and Brill, a pair of American Egyptologists, uncover a gray stone dome in the desert. Allison is convinced it is the tomb of a Stygian who pre-dates the Egyptians by millennia. Talks about how the Egyptians came to be after the Hyborian age. What follows (Price's portion) is a lucid dream sequence in which Allison's past self, Bane the Vanir is helping to conquer Stygia. Bane enters the temple and fights illusions in the form of temple guards and monsters before he finally encounters the Stygian priest. Once the priest is dead, Allison wakes up to find himself in the temple. He is attacked by his friend Brill in the guise of the Stygian priest. They settle their millenia long score when Allison kills Brill and then falls into a permanent coma (or dies?) in the tomb. 12/26/2012 - The Challenge from Beyond - C.L. Moore, A. Merritt, H.P. Lovecraft, Robert E. Howard, Frank Belknap Long - Nameless Cults A round robin story in which a camper finds a strange quartz like cube with strange writing inside. By the time HPL gets hold of the story the man's mind is sucked across the void to another planet to occupy an alien body yithian style (he even mentions yithians in the text). HPL alsomgoes into a long diatribe about the aliens and how the cube got there, etc. He attributes he Eltdown Shards. Arriving on the far away planet, REH takes up the tale and the human occupied alien body start kicking ass and takes over the planet. The human body fails utterly in Long's portion leaving the hero large and in charge on the alien planet.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ricardo

    Best known for the creation of Conan (I actually only know the films and some comics) and Solomon Kane, this book compiles a set of stories mostly linked with the horror genre. The stories are influenced by Lovecraft's works (a friend fo Howard) and you can see that in some references or atmospheres. However, I never felt the same unease that Lovecraft's work had while reading this book. It resembled more a adventure book with some occult background. Unlike Lovecraft's characters, Howard's main le Best known for the creation of Conan (I actually only know the films and some comics) and Solomon Kane, this book compiles a set of stories mostly linked with the horror genre. The stories are influenced by Lovecraft's works (a friend fo Howard) and you can see that in some references or atmospheres. However, I never felt the same unease that Lovecraft's work had while reading this book. It resembled more a adventure book with some occult background. Unlike Lovecraft's characters, Howard's main leads were mostly Conan-like figures read to jump into the fray. It has some interesting notions and stories providing a well spent time, but I still prefer the lunacy and mental aspects of Lovecraft's work.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    An excellent collection of the Howard stories related to H. P. Lovecraft's mythos. I am usually more a fan of Howard's action stories but these were very good reads. Very recommended An excellent collection of the Howard stories related to H. P. Lovecraft's mythos. I am usually more a fan of Howard's action stories but these were very good reads. Very recommended

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Robert E Howard found a successful formula in writing, as he did with his Conan the Barbarian stories, and stuck with it. He either placed his characters directly in a barbaric past or his heroes were modern men that fell asleep only to mysteriously be transported in body and in time to that savage time. This is pulp fiction at its unsurprising finest. For as predictable a writer as Howard was, these stories are entertaining and they are short enough to hold the readers interest. The Cthulhu/Lov Robert E Howard found a successful formula in writing, as he did with his Conan the Barbarian stories, and stuck with it. He either placed his characters directly in a barbaric past or his heroes were modern men that fell asleep only to mysteriously be transported in body and in time to that savage time. This is pulp fiction at its unsurprising finest. For as predictable a writer as Howard was, these stories are entertaining and they are short enough to hold the readers interest. The Cthulhu/Lovecraft tie in is in some of the names, and storylines borrowed from that author, and readers expecting anything deeper into that mythos should read Lin Carter, Clark Aston Smith or the more recent Donald Tyson. My only concern, and I have read an insurmountable amount of books edited by Robert M. Price, is amount of unfinished stories completed by others. This is a minor concern as each author does a wonderful job of emulating Howard’s style, but the purest in me looks at a compilation of a specific authors work and only his own.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael Ritchie

    Howard, creator of Conan the Barbarian, wrote many non-Conan stories, some of adventure and some of the supernatural. Several are collected here. Despite the subtitle, the Cthulhu connections are often quite thin--more often, the stories feel vaguely Lovecraftian, though not written in Lovecraft's wordy and poetic style, but contain very little aside from a mention or two of a mythos name to directly tie them to the Cthulhu stories. Still, most of these are worth reading, especially for fans of Howard, creator of Conan the Barbarian, wrote many non-Conan stories, some of adventure and some of the supernatural. Several are collected here. Despite the subtitle, the Cthulhu connections are often quite thin--more often, the stories feel vaguely Lovecraftian, though not written in Lovecraft's wordy and poetic style, but contain very little aside from a mention or two of a mythos name to directly tie them to the Cthulhu stories. Still, most of these are worth reading, especially for fans of the the classic-era Weird Tales.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    A good selection of stories, although there are definitely some repeats if you have some of Howard's other horror related collections. There are also some fragments that Howard never finished that other authors finish. These stories are entertaining enough, but they are not the same, and helps illustrate how unique of a voice Howard had. A good selection of stories, although there are definitely some repeats if you have some of Howard's other horror related collections. There are also some fragments that Howard never finished that other authors finish. These stories are entertaining enough, but they are not the same, and helps illustrate how unique of a voice Howard had.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David Szondy

    Robert E Howard is best known today for creating the sword-wielding barbarian Conan, but what many people forget is that he was a close friend of H P Lovecraft and a major influence on the development of the latter's Cthulhu Mythos. Read more Robert E Howard is best known today for creating the sword-wielding barbarian Conan, but what many people forget is that he was a close friend of H P Lovecraft and a major influence on the development of the latter's Cthulhu Mythos. Read more

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aaron the Pink Donut

    The collected Cthulhu mythos stories from the man who brought you Conan. Very approachable and particularly entertaining group of stories.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joe Ross

    Weak in a few spots, but there are some buried treasures in here for Howard fans!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Book collector

    This is a generic review. The first paragraph concerns the author himself, then there are short sections on his various works. The star ratings will indicate my feelings on the individual books. Howard is however one of my favourite authors so aren't many lower ratings! Robert Ervin Howard was a prolific author of "pulp fiction" one of many people who filled the pages of cheap mass produced fiction in the 1920's and 30's (the time period in which Howard contributed) but don't underestimate the qu This is a generic review. The first paragraph concerns the author himself, then there are short sections on his various works. The star ratings will indicate my feelings on the individual books. Howard is however one of my favourite authors so aren't many lower ratings! Robert Ervin Howard was a prolific author of "pulp fiction" one of many people who filled the pages of cheap mass produced fiction in the 1920's and 30's (the time period in which Howard contributed) but don't underestimate the quality of Howard's and other authors work from that period. Yes the pulps can be overwritten at times but those writers were paid by the word so it's perfectly understandable they occasionally... embellish a little. Howard was born in 1906 his writing career began after his family settled in cross plains, Texas. He lived with his father, a local doctor and his mother who was in ill-health. Bob Howard produced hundreds of stories in the short period before his sad death from suicide after hearing of his mother's impending death in 1936. Howard never got to see the acclaim his work would achieve in later years, especially from the 1990's onwards as more of his original work was found and published by a dedicated group of America fans. His output was as varied as it was prolific. He wrote straight westerns, boxing tales, horror, adventure, historical adventure, science fiction, comedy westerns, comedy boxing tales and was the creator of a genre of fantasy that has proliferated to this day: sword & sorcery. Kull the conqueror was one of the first creations but it is conan the cimmerian who consolidated the sword & sorcery format. Howard's writing is fast, energetic, often brutally graphic (for the time) and always entertaining. His comedy writing is great fun, his horror thrilling and his adventure stories exciting. I've spent over 25 years hunting out as much of his original material as I could. For me he is the first and still the best modern fantasy writer. There is something to take into account as with all writing of this age. Language and attitudes reflect the times and may not sit comfortably with us now. Howard was a product of his early twentieth century Texas upbringing. He was fascinated by the stories of neighbours who had been former slaves (and how disturbing is it that a man born in 1906 actually knew people who had been slaves) and he admired them and used elements in his work. Howard wrote in a time period that used words and descriptions that many now find uncomfortable. To be honest I find it uncomfortable myself but you have to read books in the context of when they were written. Take the time period into account and the socio-political landscape at that time. When I first read Howard's work I was surprised by how many strong characters were female or from ethnic backgrounds.  Yes there are stereotypes. It was the 20's and 30's. But if you take things in context and concentrate on the stories and the writing Howard's work along with that of writers from the classics such as Shakespeare, robert louis Stevenson, herbert george wells, through the the crime writers of the golden age of crime to the age of 007 in the 50's and 60's and into those of the recent past are still just as enjoyable as they ever were. So to the books. Kull. A good character and forerunner to conan. The various stories are exciting and fast paced. Conan. Probably Howard's most famous creation and certainly the most successful since his creation. The conan stories are brilliant. They span the life of conan from his time as a young thief to his being a king. The hyborian age is well thought out and varied giving multiple locations for the stories. Howard's conan is intelligent as well as being the brave musclebound warrior. The history of conan is interesting. Created in 1927 he was a hit in the pulps. Fondly remembered by some but mostly forgotten until the 60's when the original stories were rediscovered by Lyon sprague de camp and lin carter. I have a bit of a problem with Lyon sprague de camp. It's a problem which only came to light after I'd read several of the conan books from him. I came to his writing mainly through the conan stories in the late 1980's and several years after reading those 1960's de camp versions I began to read the original Robert Howard versions. They were a revelation. If you believed de camp then he rewrote the stories to improve the poor writing of Howard. Read the original conan stories and those original stories of Howard's that de camp turned into conan stories and you soon realise where the quality and power of those tales lay. Howard historians have spent decades putting the record straight and if you like the conan stories I urge you to read anything and everything from Robert Ervin Howard. I make no apologies here as Howard is one of my favourite authors and de camp's treatment of his legacy was at best unfair and at worst... well I'll leave that for you to decide. Conan also features in one of the rare full novels from Howard, the hour of the dragon. Solomon kane. Another great character.  The puritan warrior stalks through his tales dealing with horrors in Europe and Africa.  These are some of Howard's best stories and after conan, kane is his best character. Sailor Steve costigan Comedy boxing tales that contain all the brutality of bare knuckle boxing but with a touch of rough humour. Costigan is a good character and these are fun stories. Brekenridge elkins. A gent from bare creek was a rare novel from howard. Comprising of a series of short stories originally released separately these were edited to form a novel. This is a comedy western that is a lot of fun. Lots of action as usual with fists flying in funny tales as elkins misadventures untold. A well written set of stories. Bran mak morn. Good fantasy stories. Bran is the last king of a tribe of pictish warriors. Boxing stories. Howard's boxing tales are very good. Standout though is the excellent iron man, one of my favourite stories. Westerns Lots of excellent western stories. Some straight action, some comedy and others horror based. Historical adventures. Including the original red sonya (and yes, that is the correct spelling) the historically set tales are varied and entertaining. Many settings and varied characters. Some brilliant stories including lord of samercand, the aforementioned red sonya story, the shadow of the vulture and the dark agnes tales. Horror. Lots of good horror tales. Pigeons from hell is probably one of the most famous but there are many others that are just as good. Adventure. A lot of adventure stories including the excellent el borak tales. Science fiction. Not much science fiction although there is an element of sci fi in several of his fantasy tales. One full novel in the john carter of Mars style is almuric. There is a debate over whether this novel is pure howard or completed by another author but I don't really mind either way as it was great fun. Fantasy. As well as kull and conan there are many other fantasy stories. Poetry. I'm not a big fan of poetry. But I read a lot of Howard's in various short story collections before buying an excellent collection of just his poetry. Biography/letters There are some excellent biographies of Howard including Mark finn's blood and thunder and novalynne price ellis' one who walks alone. Howard was a prolific Letter writer and the collections of the correspondence between him and Howard Phillips lovecraft are fascinating. I'd highly recommend Howard. If you enjoy action filled stories then you'll enjoy these.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Dean

    REH stories involving some sort of Lovecraftian content, usually Koth or Gol-Gorath, which are Howard inventions incorporated into the Mythos. Includes stories with King Kull, Bran Mak Morn, Black Turlough, and REH's normal collection of Allison's and Brill's. Each story is preceded by a short descriptive with background information. Many of the stories are found in other collections, such as "The Black Stone" and "Worms of the Earth"(EVERY collection). Also some unfinished works completed by va REH stories involving some sort of Lovecraftian content, usually Koth or Gol-Gorath, which are Howard inventions incorporated into the Mythos. Includes stories with King Kull, Bran Mak Morn, Black Turlough, and REH's normal collection of Allison's and Brill's. Each story is preceded by a short descriptive with background information. Many of the stories are found in other collections, such as "The Black Stone" and "Worms of the Earth"(EVERY collection). Also some unfinished works completed by various authors like August Derleth, some more successful than others. And a very interesting piece where five different authors provide a single chapter to a single story. Joining REH in "The Challenge from Beyond" are C. L. Moore, A. Merritt, HPL, and Frank Belknap Long. For anyone who ever wished that one of Lovecraft's heroes would have stopped gibbering and drooling long enough to punch a shoggoth in the nose(or the area where a nose should be) this is for you. It's not all Conan slaying monsters, but REH's men face their horror standing up, running in terror only after the danger has passed and they have time to think about what they just saw. Great Mythos stuff, plus a Dr. Fu-Manchu story thrown in just because.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Who else but Robert E. Howard to stand toe-to-toe with other pulp legend H.P. Lovecraft and come away on equal footing? That Howard and Lovecraft were pen pals of sorts fills me with delight. Two mighty writers' visions culminate in solid, pulp greatness. Who else but Robert E. Howard to stand toe-to-toe with other pulp legend H.P. Lovecraft and come away on equal footing? That Howard and Lovecraft were pen pals of sorts fills me with delight. Two mighty writers' visions culminate in solid, pulp greatness.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    I love Robert E. Howard! The poor, doomed Texan friend of Lovecraft, creator of Conan and Kull. Read him.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  16. 5 out of 5

    Clifford Low

  17. 5 out of 5

    Abhishek Nair

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nuno Oliveira

  21. 5 out of 5

    Manuel Castellano

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ilham Abbasov

  24. 4 out of 5

    Toteslaut

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Fallone

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Steussy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shane Lindsey

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scott

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