Hot Best Seller

Children of the Sea, Volume 4

Availability: Ready to download

Jim, Dehdeh and Ruka's mom finally track down Anglade's yacht, but neither the rogue scientist nor Umi or Ruka are on board. All that remains is a cryptic invitation to Jim. While Jim tries to figure out the game his ex-colleague is playing and Kanako dives into memories of her daughter Ruka, the strange seachanges continue around the globe. Jim, Dehdeh and Ruka's mom finally track down Anglade's yacht, but neither the rogue scientist nor Umi or Ruka are on board. All that remains is a cryptic invitation to Jim. While Jim tries to figure out the game his ex-colleague is playing and Kanako dives into memories of her daughter Ruka, the strange seachanges continue around the globe.


Compare

Jim, Dehdeh and Ruka's mom finally track down Anglade's yacht, but neither the rogue scientist nor Umi or Ruka are on board. All that remains is a cryptic invitation to Jim. While Jim tries to figure out the game his ex-colleague is playing and Kanako dives into memories of her daughter Ruka, the strange seachanges continue around the globe. Jim, Dehdeh and Ruka's mom finally track down Anglade's yacht, but neither the rogue scientist nor Umi or Ruka are on board. All that remains is a cryptic invitation to Jim. While Jim tries to figure out the game his ex-colleague is playing and Kanako dives into memories of her daughter Ruka, the strange seachanges continue around the globe.

30 review for Children of the Sea, Volume 4

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nelson

    Absolutely incredible. This volume is basically the rehearsal before the final performance, bringing all the threads together to prepare for the finale. Some more clarity is reached before the inevitable final revelations.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nikki in Niagara

    Reason for Reading: next in the series This is the stage of a manga series where it gets difficult to give a plot summary without giving away what has happened so far. Possibly cryptic generalities include Ruka's mother finally becoming a main character involved in the plot, flashbacks to her past, flashbacks to Anglade's past and even Dehdeh's past. Thus we are filled in on a lot of backstory as to why these people are all joined together in this bizarre marine story. A new theme is approached, Reason for Reading: next in the series This is the stage of a manga series where it gets difficult to give a plot summary without giving away what has happened so far. Possibly cryptic generalities include Ruka's mother finally becoming a main character involved in the plot, flashbacks to her past, flashbacks to Anglade's past and even Dehdeh's past. Thus we are filled in on a lot of backstory as to why these people are all joined together in this bizarre marine story. A new theme is approached, that of birth and death, which engulfs the whole story from a metaphysical point of view. The act of birth is the main theme, with death closely tied to it. Things are both becoming clearer and more confusing at the same time. This volume is one that gets deep into the "whys and wherefores" of the plot without too much actually happening to further it along. The artwork in this series, as usual, is absolutely gorgeous. An intense ending leaves one eager for the following volume. This is one of the more unique manga series I've read and while this volume isn't the best of the lot so far, it is a needed one, story-wise, and I anticipate reading vol. 5 greatly . Re-Read Aug/2012: My original review for this volume gave a rating of 3/5 but I am certainly raisong that up to 4/5 this time. It makes a lot more sense reading the books back to back than it did originally waiting 7 months between reads! My original review pretty much covers everything except I am not confused as I was then; I actually am piecing things together; absolutely love the life/birth references and am hoping the finale will bring that all together with a birth.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    The truest moment in this book: when Anglade says, "As you can see, I'm very talkative" (320). At this point, the story has become so ethereal and dream-like, I'm rarely certain what chronological point we're at, where anybody is, why they're doing what they're doing, or how I'm supposed to feel about it. The mythology is getting so big and unwieldy, the story seems about to collapse on itself. It's interesting, but it's losing me. Unfortunately, the local public library doesn't have the fifth and The truest moment in this book: when Anglade says, "As you can see, I'm very talkative" (320). At this point, the story has become so ethereal and dream-like, I'm rarely certain what chronological point we're at, where anybody is, why they're doing what they're doing, or how I'm supposed to feel about it. The mythology is getting so big and unwieldy, the story seems about to collapse on itself. It's interesting, but it's losing me. Unfortunately, the local public library doesn't have the fifth and final volume in the series, so this is it for me. I look forward to watching the anime, to see how that version of the story resolves everything.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    Oh this is getting so good!! Just one last volume. I think Anglade is my favorite character. And I like the inclusion of the ama a lot (women divers). And there is a whole section devoted to space science and the conditions required for a planet to have water (which will allow it to contain life). Super excited to have randomly stumbled across this series at the library.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Children of the Sea has been consistently lovely, with a strange, dreamlike quality. And very, very slow plot development. This volume in particular is oddly and uncharacteristically full of it, with an awful lot of backstory coming in to start to explain what is going on and why. The fifth and final volume is due to be released this month, so now is probably a good time to jump on board. I do like this series, and I'm now invested in seeing where this goes, but I might have been every bit as ha Children of the Sea has been consistently lovely, with a strange, dreamlike quality. And very, very slow plot development. This volume in particular is oddly and uncharacteristically full of it, with an awful lot of backstory coming in to start to explain what is going on and why. The fifth and final volume is due to be released this month, so now is probably a good time to jump on board. I do like this series, and I'm now invested in seeing where this goes, but I might have been every bit as happy if Igarashi had done a marine-themed art book instead. It would have been a breathtaking art book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Fae

    The art is gorgeous as usual, but good grief is this story confusing.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Not much happens in this, the fourth of five volumes of a justifiably celebrated seinen manga series, but we learn more about what the story is essentially about, and we get plenty of back story as the search for Sora and Umi continues. The art takes an even more central focus as things proceed. Talk proliferates early on, but as we proceed, images take on what we have know from the beginning are the central focus… and sound. Early on, we get backstories of DehDeh and Ruka's mom, with lots of ph Not much happens in this, the fourth of five volumes of a justifiably celebrated seinen manga series, but we learn more about what the story is essentially about, and we get plenty of back story as the search for Sora and Umi continues. The art takes an even more central focus as things proceed. Talk proliferates early on, but as we proceed, images take on what we have know from the beginning are the central focus… and sound. Early on, we get backstories of DehDeh and Ruka's mom, with lots of philosophizing and not much action and this is useful information to know if you want to know what the heck is the purpose of this series, but in terms of action, everything feels slow. And that is the point, in a way. If you want a page-turning thriller, if you want an action-filled plot, you need to go to another series. We're talking future of the planet here, people! There's a lot of metaphysical talk in the first third of this volume which is useful in a number of ways. As story it is slow and plodding and somewhat annoying if you like traditional narrative progression; after four volumes we know very little about the kids who are central images in this tale. We know, however, lots of ideas about the universe put out there by various characters, much of it mystical and metaphysical. The kids are essentially these images of connections to the natural world, the sea; they are largely absent in terms of the plot, having left to go where all the fish and other sea creatures seem to be going, but even when they were with us, they didn't talk much, they are representations of close natural world relations. But another purpose for this lack of language from the kids becomes clear as we proceed, as we move to the climax of this tale: language is itself limiting, rationality is limiting, scientific conceptions are limited… Again in this volume, whale song--and even a whale chorus!--becomes a central image. The sea, the universe, speaks to us and marine biology, or for that matter astronomy, science in general, while necessary in some ways for understanding what is going on in terms of statistics, is woefully limited. Igarashi, primarily an artist, of course, cares most for poetry, for music, for drawn and painted images of beauty. Increasingly, he wants us to learn that words are only one form of communication; all creatures, and the sea and sky itself, speak to us. And what are they telling us? Among other things, that birth and death are central to our becoming part of the universe. We are the world! This is an environmental tale, an Earth Day (no, Earth Life) tale for the present and decidedly scary environmental future. If we only pay attention to human language and ways of seeing, we will continue to kill the planet, as we have been doing. We have to listen to the planet and non-human creatures, and water… and mystery. It makes me think of Adam Hines's amazing ecoterrorist comic, Duncan the Wonderdog, Show One, which replaces analytical conceptions of the world with a pastiche, a bricolage, of representations and performances, beyond rational and scientific understanding. Both Duncan and Children of the Sea are among other things affirmations and assertions of the importance of art, in the scope of environmental politics. Which is deeply sad when we think that art and music have largely been cast aside in the epistemologically corporatized American schools. Think about art, music as partners in researching and knowing the world with science. Complementary partners,perhaps, and ultimately, Igarashi does not disrespect science; there's a lot of attention to and knowledge of science in this series. One other way of knowing and research that Igarashi cares about is myth, especially long told oral stories about the origins of the world. These he spends some time working through, even as he (possibly?) invents his own. There's a dramatic trip to Antarctica in this volume, led by Jim, where a couple ancient sea creatures are discovered, perhaps echoing an event that happened a few years ago Igarashi would be well aware of off the coast of Japan: http://www.vidoevo.com/yvideo.php?i=R... There have actually been sightings of several prehistoric sea creatures in the past several years around Japan. Why? Climate change, for sure, is part of it, probably some disruption in the melting of Antarctica. Igarashi seems to speculate (as many are speculating variously about this amazing series of events), that the death of the planet we are witnessing might also be signaling its rebirth in some way, some tapping into the collective consciousness/memory of the planet through the ocean. Stay tuned for volume 5!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Originally posted here at Anime Radius. If you have been reading Children of the Sea so far, you are familiar with the permanent hallmarks of the series: the deeply involving introspective moments; the gorgeous art that sometimes verges on the abstract; a colorful and developed cast of characters; a progressive and slowly blooming plot that develops at a pace that always leaves readers wanting more by chapter's end. If you haven't been reading it yet then - well - you should go on and read the pr Originally posted here at Anime Radius. If you have been reading Children of the Sea so far, you are familiar with the permanent hallmarks of the series: the deeply involving introspective moments; the gorgeous art that sometimes verges on the abstract; a colorful and developed cast of characters; a progressive and slowly blooming plot that develops at a pace that always leaves readers wanting more by chapter's end. If you haven't been reading it yet then - well - you should go on and read the previous three volumes, savoring them slowly, before reading volume three because this is not a manga you can jump in the middle with both feet and expect to enjoy it to the upmost levels possible. So fellow readers can understand when I say that the fourth volume is, for lack of better words, rather monumental. What's so major about this volume of Children of the Sea? There is plot development - and tons of it. And with all of the development, we get insight into more and more mysteries. For one thing, we get to look deep into the pasts of both Kanako and Anglade, giving their characters some much needed expansion. Granted, Anglade is still a bit of a mystery - and very mysterious in nature - but I'm glad for the look at Kanako's youth and the circumstances that led to Ruka's birth. She's turned from a slightly developed character to one that is well-rounded and terribly interesting; I'm looking forward to more of the chapters with Kanako and Dehdeh. Their trip across the sea in search of Ruka and Umi is immensely fascinating, as is Ruka's descent into the ocean with the meteorite in her body - although who knows how long that odd relationship between human and stone will last, if the volume's cliffhanger ending is anything to go by. Fish are disappearing, the ocean is becoming more active than ever, the creatures of the water are continuing to attract attention from not only the marine biologists but also the world at large - and in the middle of everything are Ruka and Umi and Sora, the children of the sea. There's drama and action and mystery and beautiful art and everything you could ever ask of a seinen manga. You want a deeply underappreciated series that deserves all the critical acclaim it garners from day one? You want Children of the Sea - and if the latest volume is anything to go by, Daisuke Igarashi is doing his best to make it a modern-day manga classic.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Asparkofc

    This is the kind of thing I would love to write

  10. 5 out of 5

    Child960801

    This is the fourth book in the series. We get a flashback to the trip to Antarctica and to when Ruka's mother was a girl. Ruka and Umi are in an unspecified location. This manga continues to be very strange. This is the fourth book in the series. We get a flashback to the trip to Antarctica and to when Ruka's mother was a girl. Ruka and Umi are in an unspecified location. This manga continues to be very strange.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I'm not even sure what just happened. XD I'm not even sure what just happened. XD

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie -BooksLessTravelled

    This are starting to happen and the tension is building. I really enjoy this series, and this one is literally the beginning of the end. This one explains a lot of the back story for some of the main characters, and prepares the reader for the finale. While not much happens, this is vital in better understanding the story and characters as a whole.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    This one slowly starts to build toward something climactic on the horizon, but all the pieces aren’t all in place yet. I both wanted to turn the pages to know more and yet savour the unique and detailed art. Continues to be viscerally visual, mysterious and mythic.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Geraldine

    This volume of the series really had me wondering, where is Anglade and Umi? AND is Ruka going to die?! *insert very sad face* I hate when books leave you confused. Although I know that this is a good thing for authors since it would make us read/ buy their other books, but really? -__- I hope I can find a copy of the 5th volume in one of the SF libraries because curiosity is killing meeee!! Overall, I really love this series, it made me think, feel, and it is very entertaining especially when y This volume of the series really had me wondering, where is Anglade and Umi? AND is Ruka going to die?! *insert very sad face* I hate when books leave you confused. Although I know that this is a good thing for authors since it would make us read/ buy their other books, but really? -__- I hope I can find a copy of the 5th volume in one of the SF libraries because curiosity is killing meeee!! Overall, I really love this series, it made me think, feel, and it is very entertaining especially when you commute home.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nour Boukhris

    2.5 This series became boring and wtf in every volume .... I hope I'll like the final book 2.5 This series became boring and wtf in every volume .... I hope I'll like the final book

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    probably the creepiest out of all the volumes.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Good.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    Ah! So confusing and intriguing at the same time! What is to happen? My brain is befuddled.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ayen

    Wait what? I'm confused Wait what? I'm confused

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ericka

    Lots of naval gazing in this volume. Super slow. When will he get to the point already???

  21. 5 out of 5

    Grilled Toast

    It’s fine, getting bored of this series though.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Georgia’s OG Otaku

    3.5* I don’t dislike these books by any means. In fact I throughly enjoy them. I also love and appreciate the weirdness. I’m just confused how they can wrap up the many questions in a single volume.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sky Rose

    4.5⭐: Review to come.

  24. 5 out of 5

    ashton fabian

    the art is just as gorgeous as ever. manages to begin tying all the loose threads together before the finale. absolute incredibly done, 8/10

  25. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This volume feels very "loose". Very little action occurs in the narrative present, or focused on the main characters; most of it is flashbacks, reminiscences, and/or the actions of side characters. Anglade's assertion that there is some sort of secret society (or several of them) associated with the sea is interesting, but feels like it is only vaguely connected to everything else that is happening. But connected with the vignette, the "sixth testimony of the sea" that opens this volume, I can' This volume feels very "loose". Very little action occurs in the narrative present, or focused on the main characters; most of it is flashbacks, reminiscences, and/or the actions of side characters. Anglade's assertion that there is some sort of secret society (or several of them) associated with the sea is interesting, but feels like it is only vaguely connected to everything else that is happening. But connected with the vignette, the "sixth testimony of the sea" that opens this volume, I can't help but want to tie it all in with Lovecraftian cults, blurring the line of the idea of the deep-ones and their cross-bred enclaves in coastal regions, but also the Cthulhu cult which apparently assassinates people that know too much, and this is kind of an interesting idea to play with. But there is also a chunk of the book were Anglade holds a conversation with a music box mechanism and reflects on how vast the universe is, and how insignificant humans are in this vastness, which is an idea strongly at odds with the humano- and earth-centric mysticism that is developed in the rest of the series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charliesabers

    The series as a whole is good. The story is interesting, deep and thought provoking, and weaves a fascinating tale about the origin of life, death and everything in between. I did not particularly like the main cast. They receive a bit of development, but are mostly there as vehicles for the story. Maybe Ruka, her mom, Anglade and Dehdeh could be considered the best of the bunch. The pacing is kind slow, but not in a bad way. I definitely was actively finding time to read it, but it is no page t The series as a whole is good. The story is interesting, deep and thought provoking, and weaves a fascinating tale about the origin of life, death and everything in between. I did not particularly like the main cast. They receive a bit of development, but are mostly there as vehicles for the story. Maybe Ruka, her mom, Anglade and Dehdeh could be considered the best of the bunch. The pacing is kind slow, but not in a bad way. I definitely was actively finding time to read it, but it is no page turner like Pluto or MW. The one thing I loved the most about this series is the AMAZING art. Many a frame from these books could be shown on a museum. It looks natural, organic, and the depictions of sea flora and fauna are amazingly detailed and full of life. I definitely recommend the series for the art and smart concept alone, but it could've used a bit more exposition to clear up a few confusing plot points.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    Still totally loving this series. This volume gets pretty deep, no puns intended. It's as much about the nature of life and death, the interconnectedness of life and origins of sentient beings as it is about mysterious children and their connection to the sea. At this point in our story, Umi, Sora and Ruka have all gone missing (sort of). Ruka's mother and Dehdeh go off in search of the kids and find a feminine connection to the sea. Jim reflects on the early days working with Anglade and Sora. Still totally loving this series. This volume gets pretty deep, no puns intended. It's as much about the nature of life and death, the interconnectedness of life and origins of sentient beings as it is about mysterious children and their connection to the sea. At this point in our story, Umi, Sora and Ruka have all gone missing (sort of). Ruka's mother and Dehdeh go off in search of the kids and find a feminine connection to the sea. Jim reflects on the early days working with Anglade and Sora. Anglade waxes philosophical about the elements that make up life and the universe. A lot going on with gorgeous artwork complementing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mikael Kuoppala

    Still dreamlike, beautiful and intriguing, “Children of the Sea” continues to enchant. By the fourth volume I’m beginning to grow suspicious about where- if anywhere- the series might be headed, however. So far it’s been all setup with very little promise of payoff. It has worked out fine to this point, but the story better start getting somewhere soon, or the series might lose the magic that makes it so special.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    This series is getting deep and very thought provoking. The blending of sea life,some mystery children and creation myths is lovely. Then comes some philosophical ideas about standing at the seashore is standing at the edge of life and death. What is life on one side is death on the other. So is death simply a re-birth somewhere else? oooh, such a fun story with great ideas being shared is subtle ways that just slide into your mind and allow you to explore your own self.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    Yeah...this one lost me a little. We do sort of get some back story on Ruka's parents and why Ruka has perhaps become involved with Sora and Umi and whatever's going on with them, but especially towards the end I was pretty much just thinking, "Huh? Wait, what now? Hamnu?" One more volume to go...hopefully that last one maybe explains...something? Yeah...this one lost me a little. We do sort of get some back story on Ruka's parents and why Ruka has perhaps become involved with Sora and Umi and whatever's going on with them, but especially towards the end I was pretty much just thinking, "Huh? Wait, what now? Hamnu?" One more volume to go...hopefully that last one maybe explains...something?

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...