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Buddhism for Mothers: A Calm Approach to Caring for Yourself and Your Children

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Addressing the often-overlooked spiritual needs of mothers, this book discusses Buddhist teachings as applied to the everyday challenges and stresses of raising children. Offered are ways for mothers to reconnect with their inner selves and become calmer and happier—with the recognition that a happier mother will be a better parent. This realistic look at motherhood acknow Addressing the often-overlooked spiritual needs of mothers, this book discusses Buddhist teachings as applied to the everyday challenges and stresses of raising children. Offered are ways for mothers to reconnect with their inner selves and become calmer and happier—with the recognition that a happier mother will be a better parent. This realistic look at motherhood acknowledges the sorrows as well as the joys of mothering and offers real and achievable coping strategies for mothers to renew their lives on a deep level.


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Addressing the often-overlooked spiritual needs of mothers, this book discusses Buddhist teachings as applied to the everyday challenges and stresses of raising children. Offered are ways for mothers to reconnect with their inner selves and become calmer and happier—with the recognition that a happier mother will be a better parent. This realistic look at motherhood acknow Addressing the often-overlooked spiritual needs of mothers, this book discusses Buddhist teachings as applied to the everyday challenges and stresses of raising children. Offered are ways for mothers to reconnect with their inner selves and become calmer and happier—with the recognition that a happier mother will be a better parent. This realistic look at motherhood acknowledges the sorrows as well as the joys of mothering and offers real and achievable coping strategies for mothers to renew their lives on a deep level.

30 review for Buddhism for Mothers: A Calm Approach to Caring for Yourself and Your Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    The most meaningful parenting book I've read (and I've read a lot). Using realistic anecdotes from her own life to illustrate Buddhist principles, she clearly illustrates the ways that Buddhism as a philosophy (as opposed to a religious dogma) can help any parent. Rather than giving me specific strategies to cure my children's behavior problems--like most books do--she goes at it by looking at the only thing I really CAN fix: my own response to the behavior. It all worked so well that I immediat The most meaningful parenting book I've read (and I've read a lot). Using realistic anecdotes from her own life to illustrate Buddhist principles, she clearly illustrates the ways that Buddhism as a philosophy (as opposed to a religious dogma) can help any parent. Rather than giving me specific strategies to cure my children's behavior problems--like most books do--she goes at it by looking at the only thing I really CAN fix: my own response to the behavior. It all worked so well that I immediately reread it, and it launched my recent appetite for learning about all things Buddhist.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This has been one of my favorite parenting books to date. It is an easy-to-understand Buddhist approach to living with children. This is the book that really put into perspective for me that my children come from me, but are not me. On a daily basis I have to remind myself that my children are autonomous human beings with minds that I can never know, only experience in increments. I also felt like the guidance in this book regarding how to be the calm [or find humor] in the center of chaos was p This has been one of my favorite parenting books to date. It is an easy-to-understand Buddhist approach to living with children. This is the book that really put into perspective for me that my children come from me, but are not me. On a daily basis I have to remind myself that my children are autonomous human beings with minds that I can never know, only experience in increments. I also felt like the guidance in this book regarding how to be the calm [or find humor] in the center of chaos was practical.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

    A good 'reminder' book for parents. While I don't see myself becoming an 'official' Buddhist anytime soon, I did find lots of helpful ideas and tools in this book for my never-ending quest for mindful and compassionate parenting (which seems like it should be a no-brainer, but everyone with kids knows different!). I really like the take that Napthali takes on parents as meditators - to parapharse: It is nice to have unlimited time to meditate, but parents of small children are really on the harde A good 'reminder' book for parents. While I don't see myself becoming an 'official' Buddhist anytime soon, I did find lots of helpful ideas and tools in this book for my never-ending quest for mindful and compassionate parenting (which seems like it should be a no-brainer, but everyone with kids knows different!). I really like the take that Napthali takes on parents as meditators - to parapharse: It is nice to have unlimited time to meditate, but parents of small children are really on the hardest 'spiritual path' that could be invented. The entire world seems to be hell-bent on pulling focus from the present moment, but with thought it is possible to stay in the moment more often. And if you can do that as a parent, you can do damn near any other meditation task set to you!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dagný

    This is the first book I finished reading after my precious Ella was born. It has touched me deeply in many ways and spoken the words I had struggled to find by myself about the torrent of new and unfamiliar feelings after becoming a mother. The author bases her chapters roughly on the Noble Eight-fold Path of Buddhism. She talks about how practices such as mindfulness, meditation, compassion and remembering the ever-changing nature of the world can help mothers achieve a calm and loving mindset This is the first book I finished reading after my precious Ella was born. It has touched me deeply in many ways and spoken the words I had struggled to find by myself about the torrent of new and unfamiliar feelings after becoming a mother. The author bases her chapters roughly on the Noble Eight-fold Path of Buddhism. She talks about how practices such as mindfulness, meditation, compassion and remembering the ever-changing nature of the world can help mothers achieve a calm and loving mindset every day as they take care of their children and their families. The strongest points of the book are living with mindfulness and compassion, and implementing these practices in everyday life such as relationships with friends, family and children. I am not officially a Buddhist, but it seems that I've been evolving a mindset over the past years that has gotten closer and closer to the Buddhist teachings without me even realizing it. Reading this book made this clear to me. Nevertheless I don't think it matters much whether you are interested in Buddhism, it isn't difficult to overlook the Buddhist aspects of the book. The message of loving-kindness, compassion, mindfulness and acceptance should appeal to anyone.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    I discovered this book through Goodreads and I borrowed it from our local library. I thought it would be a good book to help me be more mindful, present, calmer, and patient. I read this book slowly, trying to absorb the lessons and really take in the material just a little at a time. It's a very worthwhile read, and I really think it will help me to be more patient and calm with our girls. Whether I pursue an enlightened path or merely try to learn some practical ways to embrace gratitude and k I discovered this book through Goodreads and I borrowed it from our local library. I thought it would be a good book to help me be more mindful, present, calmer, and patient. I read this book slowly, trying to absorb the lessons and really take in the material just a little at a time. It's a very worthwhile read, and I really think it will help me to be more patient and calm with our girls. Whether I pursue an enlightened path or merely try to learn some practical ways to embrace gratitude and kindness in my life, I think it's a good book for all mothers. interesting quotes: "Tossed around by the needs of others, mothers give and give, so we must find ways to replenish ourselves. The teachings of Buddha equip us with a multitude of resources for this job, providing us with insights on coping with disturbing emotions and thoughts, as well as on living with others more calmly and happily." (p. 3) "Since there is no external savior, it is up to each of you to work out your own liberation." (p. 4) "A life typically includes birth, ageing, pain and death. We can spend our lives distracting ourselves from these facts but they are inescapable." (p. 6) "Mindfulness saves energy and time. With poor concentration, we need to repeat some of our actions because we didn't perform them mindfully the first time. An unclear mind may cause you to forget where you put things, why you came into a room, whether you locked the car, even your train of thought mid-conversation. Mindfulness counteracts absent-mindedness and cultivates mental sharpness." (p. 24) "Refusing to rate what we perceive helps us to cultivate feelings of acceptance rather than judgment, as we stop demanding that life be other than it is." (p. 29) "All phenomena are interdependent, with our every act conditioning the next one. Nothing arises by itself. In this verse, the Buddha shows the importance of thoughts in creating our karma: The thought manifests as the word; The word manifests as the deed; The deed develops the habit; And habit hardens into character. So watch the thought and its ways with care, And let it spring from love Born out of concern for all beings." (p. 34) "We torment ourselves with thoughts that whatever we are doing at the moment we should really be doing something else. When we do housework, for example, we feel that we should really be reading books with our children and vice versa." (p. 48) "Each moment is brilliantly new. It will not last, for it is in the process of changing into something else - this makes it precious." (p. 54) "Even still, our higher standard of living can't spare us from suffering and imperfection, regardless of what modern technology and advertisements promise. Modern women only experience new ways to suffer, as do modern men, for this is the nature of existence. What makes modern suffering especially painful is our belief that we needn't suffer, that we can't tolerate any discomfort and must stamp it out at any cost. We demand that life be other than it is, become attached to our vision of what should be, and feel intensely frustrated when our expectations are dashed." (p. 85) Adrienne Howley: "The mind free of worry...knows that it is not what happens to us that is of prime importance but how we react to it." (p. 85) "There is no immunisation against hurt. There is no protection against cruelty. For all the things I can do for her, saving my daughter from life's hard twists is not one of them. Tough lesson all the way round." (p. 91) "No matter what we experience it will pass. Not only that, it will change form and vary in intensity." (p. 92) "It's during the hard times that we have the best opportunities to learn about ourselves and develop self-awareness." (p. 96) "Through Buddhism I've realised that many of the trouble spots I've experienced with friends over the years have been due to an insensitive clinging to my own views. In situations where restraint would have been the wisest option, I've felt compelled to express my opinion, often trampling over a friend's feelings. In defense of a cherished belief, I've failed to listen with openness to others or I've hastily expressed a view without regard to the complexities of the situation." (pp. 102-103) "To live lovingly simplifies our lives by purifying our minds and removing much of the guilt, anger, and stress from our relationships. We experience mental stability as we spend less time thinking about ourselves. Our own problems begin to fade in significance and we discover mental clarity and improved concentration. We become less petty, judgemental and fault-finding as we grow more interested in the well-being of others." (p. 107) "The Buddha claimed that real love has four qualities: loving kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy, and equanimity. These four divine dwelling places are interdependent and overlapping, acting like a system of checks and balances that help us question whether our love for others is genuine." (p. 108) "Importantly, when we act with loving kindness, we don't expect anything in return and, again, being mothers has taught us the art of giving without expecting a reward. When we practice loving kindness, the way people react to us becomes irrelevant, for the joy of having a loving mind is the only reward we need." (p. 109) Adam Lindsay Gordon: "Life is mostly froth and bubble Two things stand like stone Kindness in another's trouble Courage in your own." (p. 109) "...compassion isn't about 'feeling sorry' for people, in the sense of a patronising form of pity, but rather a recognition that we're all in this together, we all seek happiness and freedom from suffering." (p. 111) "As always, the truth of impermanence, or the inevitability of change, is inescapable. Even those mothers who seem to live with their soul mates concede there are phases when they 'can't get enough' of their partners followed by phases when they could 'take them or leave them.' All relationships go through seasons." (p. 124) "I needed to acknowledge firstly that bad moods are a natural part of life and that he has a right to one occasionally just as I do, and secondly that his mood always passes and doesn't always need to be squashed on sight." (pp. 130-131) Guide to the Boddhistva's Way of Life by Shantideva: "If something can be remedied, Why be unhappy about it? An if there is no remedy for it, There is still no point in being unhappy." (p. 134) "To truly listen, to be fully present for another person, is a powerful expression of love. When someone listens to you - quietly, attentively and without judgement - you enjoy a great gift. You have an opportunity to explore your reality, discover ideas, broaden and expand. You can be creative. You find an opportunity to halve your burdens. What a gift the simple act of listening can be within a partnership. (p. 140) "To be skilful listeners, capable of concentration and restraint, ensures we are so powerful resources not only to our partners but to our children too. Listening is a reliable path out of selfishness, self-absorption and self-centeredness - it makes your world a larger place." (p. 142) "Any happiness we glean from the world outside us is only temporary. Deep and lasting happiness needs to come from within." (p. 146) "The shallow consumer culture that we live in does its utmost to tell us that who we are, our self, and our worth, is what we look like. High school culture reinforces this for most of us and even now it's very rare to meet a woman who has learned to accept the way she looks, let alone the fact that she's ageing." (p. 157) "To remind themselves of the certainty of death, some Buddhists make their first thought on waking: 'Wow! I made it through the night without dying.' Some recite a mantra: 'birth, ageing, pain and death.' Others meditate on the degeneration of their bodies or on death itself. They envision their bodies buried in the ground and picture the skin slowly rotting, the bones gradually disappearing. All these practices make it easier to remember our impermanence." (p. 161) "To love people we need a loving mind more than we need people to act lovably. Our love for others won't depend on their personal characteristics, behavior or relationship with us but on our loving minds. We can even love 'difficult' people, if for no other reason than for their role in our lives as spiritual teachers. For this we can be grateful. If our lives were full of likeable people, we'd be short of opportunities to grow wiser." (pp. 176-177) "For many Buddhists, bowing is simply an expression of respect and gratitude. To bow is to honour a person's dignity, humanity and preciousness. It feels humbling, but in the most positive way, as we suspend any tendency to be judgemental and superior, and feelings of compassion arise not from pity but from heartfelt esteem for a precious living being. We can also see bowing as an expression of gratitude for all that this person, be they beloved or belligerent, teaches us. We bow in gratitude for their potential to make us wiser and for the opportunity they give us to practise love." (p. 180) "In Buddhism our access to that which is divine is through the heart: Buddhism is about love." (p. 189) "Learn to do good. Cease to do harm. Purify the mind." (p. 190) "It takes strength to resist the messages our materialistic society bombards us with the people around us might not question such messages. Often enough we live with people who think they can find happiness from cars, money, property, beauty and youth, and it's easy to absorb such values ourselves. How refreshing it is to immerse ourselves in a culture where the values are deeper than this, values such as loving kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity." (p. 196)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I'm listening to this audio version for what must be the 4th time in a few years. I'm still scribbling down notes. Points to remember. I think I should invest in the hard copy and go to town with a highlighter and sticky notes for quick reference. I have found great benefit from it in the past and feeling quite silly I forgot about this book and the value of living in the moment etc etc. Really precious parenting advice. I have no intention to be enlightened (nor call myself a Buddhist). For me I'm listening to this audio version for what must be the 4th time in a few years. I'm still scribbling down notes. Points to remember. I think I should invest in the hard copy and go to town with a highlighter and sticky notes for quick reference. I have found great benefit from it in the past and feeling quite silly I forgot about this book and the value of living in the moment etc etc. Really precious parenting advice. I have no intention to be enlightened (nor call myself a Buddhist). For me I am completely content with just trying my best where I can as its much better than when I'm not. However I will admit I find Buddhism very inspiring and meditations magic (when I do them). I've read just a couple of negative comments about this book. Things I haven't noticed myself as the audio version is so beautifully read! So if you are unsure if you'll get into it I highly recommend the audio version (borrow from your library for free). I listen while I fold the washing / mop the floors etc, it's an added bonus that I get mental clarity and an orderly home in the one package. It is not a parenting manual. But an introduction to Buddhism and how Buddhist practices can enrich our experience as mothers and help us to engage with our children better, stay calm, find the answers to a problem when there is no obvious answer, find energy, patience, resilience, let go of anxiety and expectations. The list goes on. It is not a new idea. It is Buddhism. But presented by a mum for mums.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andi Harris

    An absolute must-read for all mothers. Small children can make you feel like you've completely lost it and this is a book FOR mothers (parents, actually) about what WE feel and how we can better manage our stress. So many parenting books are about the kid. This is a refreshing and honest look into what the parents need. This may have saved my sanity. Next up is Buddhism for Mothers of Young Children: Becoming a Mindful Parent. An absolute must-read for all mothers. Small children can make you feel like you've completely lost it and this is a book FOR mothers (parents, actually) about what WE feel and how we can better manage our stress. So many parenting books are about the kid. This is a refreshing and honest look into what the parents need. This may have saved my sanity. Next up is Buddhism for Mothers of Young Children: Becoming a Mindful Parent.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lindz

    What I loved about this book was it was really centered on the mother. I like the approaches and I love the candidness of it. It gave examples of human mother moments and did not pass judgement there was useful suggestions and processes for getting past them. You may not be able to exactly relate to all of them but I think you just have to find relation in some of them. A lot of marriages struggle to keep the fire through the 0-5 years of the kids. Many moms have thoughts that are not sensible o What I loved about this book was it was really centered on the mother. I like the approaches and I love the candidness of it. It gave examples of human mother moments and did not pass judgement there was useful suggestions and processes for getting past them. You may not be able to exactly relate to all of them but I think you just have to find relation in some of them. A lot of marriages struggle to keep the fire through the 0-5 years of the kids. Many moms have thoughts that are not sensible or rational. There is something for everyone in here that they could take from it. I have been on a spiritual and calming journey for awhile now so this book didn't change my life because a lot of it was stuff I have already been using and working on but I definitely got something from it and I could see this book being a pot of gold for mothers not already on that path regardless of what religion you are.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bina Khalfay

    Great practical tips about mindful parenting. A must -read for all mums. If you're hesitating because you're not into Buddhism or religion for that matter, don't. It's more spiritual. My only regret is that I heard it as an audiobook. Would like to read it on paper/book to really retain more of what I read/heard, and maybe jot down snippets that really resonate with me. Great practical tips about mindful parenting. A must -read for all mums. If you're hesitating because you're not into Buddhism or religion for that matter, don't. It's more spiritual. My only regret is that I heard it as an audiobook. Would like to read it on paper/book to really retain more of what I read/heard, and maybe jot down snippets that really resonate with me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Patti-Ann Clarkson

    Very insightful and great examples of sinful living

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    A wonderful reference; not really sure it’s meant to be read cover to cover in one sitting; more something to savour and continually refer to.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Raine Bolton

    Love this, one of my favourite parent books. Read many times

  13. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Vlasenko

    This is a great book for young mothers and mothers-to-be. It reminds us about the importance of not losing yourself in the parenthood and to remain calm & caring for ourselves and our children. The book provides useful practices and meditation techniques along with hands-on guidance into mindful parenting

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elke Ursin

    OK, this is pretty unusual for me, to give a book one-star. But, this one was just not my cup of tea at all. It was recommended to me by a mother that I respect a great deal, and some reviews seemed to indicate that you would not need to be an active Buddhist to get some great value from this book. So, I gave it a try with an open mind and a willingness to learn. What I quickly saw was that much of the book is just quotes from other people with which I have nothing in common. One mother said tha OK, this is pretty unusual for me, to give a book one-star. But, this one was just not my cup of tea at all. It was recommended to me by a mother that I respect a great deal, and some reviews seemed to indicate that you would not need to be an active Buddhist to get some great value from this book. So, I gave it a try with an open mind and a willingness to learn. What I quickly saw was that much of the book is just quotes from other people with which I have nothing in common. One mother said that they wanted to smother their children, and that is not something I have ever even considered. Another mother said that they often thought that their marriage would not survive whatever trial they were going through, and that again is something that has never entered my mind. What did it for me was the mother that thought that she was ugly and that her daughter looked like her and was destined to lead a life of ridicule and embarrassment. Um. What kind of mother thinks this? The "teaching" part just felt like someone who had gone to the library and wrote up a college research paper on the topic of Buddhism. I got about halfway through the book before I decided I was not going to waste my time any more. I was not learning anything I did not already know when it came to being calm, so maybe that's why this book spoke so little to me. Perhaps this would be great for a mother who is studying Buddhism, or for those mothers who need to find a moment of calm, or even those that think horrible thoughts about stuff. Not for me, though.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tania

    I loved this book so much that I kind of stalled...towards the end. Loved the format and the theme. Each chapter had a summary at the end, but I hated (so not a "buddhist" emotion...)the start of each chapter. She would start each new chapter on the left side and at the very top of the page. I guess I am just peeky...I would always turn the page to make sure, that THAT was the start( I am a slow learner). It is sort of a good-feeling type of book. The buddha's teachings are so universally friendl I loved this book so much that I kind of stalled...towards the end. Loved the format and the theme. Each chapter had a summary at the end, but I hated (so not a "buddhist" emotion...)the start of each chapter. She would start each new chapter on the left side and at the very top of the page. I guess I am just peeky...I would always turn the page to make sure, that THAT was the start( I am a slow learner). It is sort of a good-feeling type of book. The buddha's teachings are so universally friendly, and practical for everydays life! Sarah Napthali also includes a list of favorite books, and buddhist websites on her appendixes. She is writings mostly about buddhism for mothers in particular, but you don't need to by a mom to like the book. To finish, I will just leave you with some verses from the scriptures: 'Do not deceive, do not despise Each other anywhere. Do not be angry, nor should you Secret resentment bear; For as a mother risks her life And watches o'er child, So boundless be your love to all, So tender, kind and mild.(...)' from the Sermon at Rajagaha

  16. 4 out of 5

    Knitpurlgurl

    This was exactly the book I was looking for and listening to it on audiobook was a delight. Sarah Napthali uses personal examples and insight to relay how the concepts of Buddhist practice can make even the most weary mom a calm, more able parent. One doesn't need to be a Buddhist to use the tools Sarah has provided. As I listened to Sarah talk about her own struggles as a mother of small children, I was instantly able to relate. Her frank approach to discussing the feelings of being overwhelmed, This was exactly the book I was looking for and listening to it on audiobook was a delight. Sarah Napthali uses personal examples and insight to relay how the concepts of Buddhist practice can make even the most weary mom a calm, more able parent. One doesn't need to be a Buddhist to use the tools Sarah has provided. As I listened to Sarah talk about her own struggles as a mother of small children, I was instantly able to relate. Her frank approach to discussing the feelings of being overwhelmed, under-appreciated, exhausted, frazzled, and filled with joy all at the same time will have any mother nodding her head in agreement. It was refreshing to hear that there are other mothers who often feel conflicted, guilty, and overwhelmed in addition to feeling the love only a mother can feel for her child. To listen to her strategies on coping with the things we mothers deal with on a daily basis was extremely helpful. I also appreciated that this book was not meant to convert mothers to Buddhist practices, but rather to use her experiences as a practicing Buddhist to offer some solutions to other mothers. I highly recommend this book to every mother. As I said, one does not have to be Buddhist or convert to Buddhism to gain insight and strategies from this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    I am loving this book so much, it has so much to teach me, I am only about half-way through and I can't wait to start reading it over again! I know my children will greatly benefit having a calmer mama...just lil' gems of knowledge I've learned already amaze me, "my thoughts are just my thoughts, they are not reality" and that by suffering, we learn, and as a mama, I don't want my children to suffer, but sometimes, trying to make them avoid suffering will cause them, and me, more pain than just I am loving this book so much, it has so much to teach me, I am only about half-way through and I can't wait to start reading it over again! I know my children will greatly benefit having a calmer mama...just lil' gems of knowledge I've learned already amaze me, "my thoughts are just my thoughts, they are not reality" and that by suffering, we learn, and as a mama, I don't want my children to suffer, but sometimes, trying to make them avoid suffering will cause them, and me, more pain than just letting them learn through their experiences.....I am borrowing this from the library, but I'm definitely going to purchase it so I can mark it up!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chrissy

    I think I've read this book twice, and I could easily read it again. It's simply awesome! For one, it's the first parenting book that I've read that really focuses on the needs of the parent (all of us moms) and gives reassurance for all those thoughts, worries, and feelings that pop up without invitation. Honestly, I think reading this has made me a much better mother, more calm and more realistic in my expectations of my children, husband, and life. I think I've read this book twice, and I could easily read it again. It's simply awesome! For one, it's the first parenting book that I've read that really focuses on the needs of the parent (all of us moms) and gives reassurance for all those thoughts, worries, and feelings that pop up without invitation. Honestly, I think reading this has made me a much better mother, more calm and more realistic in my expectations of my children, husband, and life.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marcia Case

    This is it. The book that will change my life. I've never been inspired by a book as much as this one. I highly recommend it to not only mothers, but anyone who is looking for a calmer, more peaceful life. This is it. The book that will change my life. I've never been inspired by a book as much as this one. I highly recommend it to not only mothers, but anyone who is looking for a calmer, more peaceful life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    I'm really enjoying this book. Not so much a book about Buddhism, but a good synopsis of how to balance motherhood and person-hood, from a Buddhist perspective. Encouraging and helpful! I'm really enjoying this book. Not so much a book about Buddhism, but a good synopsis of how to balance motherhood and person-hood, from a Buddhist perspective. Encouraging and helpful!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I never manage to finish this book...but reading it always makes me feel sane. :-)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    4.5 stars. This is the best parenting book I've ever read. The end. 4.5 stars. This is the best parenting book I've ever read. The end.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Amazing. She's in my head! Practical, recommended for all moms, and dads too. Amazing. She's in my head! Practical, recommended for all moms, and dads too.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Betty Macdonald Saudemont

    Although this book about the concepts of Buddhism didn't deliver ground breaking ideas, it was nice to be reminded. I enjoyed the author's approach and the way she scattered through real life examples. It helped me understand the principles a lot better.⁣ ⁣ To read this book, you don't need to believe in Buddhism or even be a mother. You can still enjoy it and perhaps take some Buddhist ideas and tools out of this book and implement them into your everyday life. A great read for all parents and ca Although this book about the concepts of Buddhism didn't deliver ground breaking ideas, it was nice to be reminded. I enjoyed the author's approach and the way she scattered through real life examples. It helped me understand the principles a lot better.⁣ ⁣ To read this book, you don't need to believe in Buddhism or even be a mother. You can still enjoy it and perhaps take some Buddhist ideas and tools out of this book and implement them into your everyday life. A great read for all parents and carers, and humans in general. ⁣ ⁣ Some quotes really resonated with me and I'll try to implement them in my life.⁣ ⁣ "I never met a mother who doesn't deserve a truck load of compassion."⁣ "We don't own our children. They are in our protection."⁣ "Can we accept the changing seasons of a relationship? That it's normal to have winters and that the springs will follow?"

  25. 5 out of 5

    passeriform

    I came across this book at the right time, and reading it at a leisurely pace has been very very useful for me. It has reconnected me with meditation and with many things I already knew but haven't thought about and/or done for years. Practical, short, and easy to read, this book fits well into the bits of time many parents can find for reading. My main gripe is that it's SO gendered, from the title (why not Buddhism for Parents?) straight through the text. If you are also sensitive to these issu I came across this book at the right time, and reading it at a leisurely pace has been very very useful for me. It has reconnected me with meditation and with many things I already knew but haven't thought about and/or done for years. Practical, short, and easy to read, this book fits well into the bits of time many parents can find for reading. My main gripe is that it's SO gendered, from the title (why not Buddhism for Parents?) straight through the text. If you are also sensitive to these issues, I'd advise skipping the first chapter--I almost quit reading because I found its dismissive treatment of partners (meaning male ones) and its assumption that mothers don't work outside the home (and fathers do) so alienating. That would have been a pity.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    “The whole world is medicine’. We can learn from everything that happens to us.” I abandoned this book several years ago and decided to begin again for my morning contemplative reading. It was perfect to read in 10 minute intervals and exactly the message I was looking for. This book covers many topics, all of which felt relevant and useful in my life right now. One of the most interesting ideas introduced to me through this book is the “spaciousness of the brain.” Sometimes, in real life, it seem “The whole world is medicine’. We can learn from everything that happens to us.” I abandoned this book several years ago and decided to begin again for my morning contemplative reading. It was perfect to read in 10 minute intervals and exactly the message I was looking for. This book covers many topics, all of which felt relevant and useful in my life right now. One of the most interesting ideas introduced to me through this book is the “spaciousness of the brain.” Sometimes, in real life, it seems as though just one tiny thing can send me over the edge. This idea – that our brains are vast spaces that can contain almost everything – has already helped me see challenges as a single drop of water in an ocean, not something to totally derail my day. Progress!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Clio

    There was some crazy clarity in here. It's an incredibly well-organized book and just flows in a way that gives you actual advice for making changes in your life for any areas in which you might feel like making changes. I don't think this book is relevant for everyone, obviously, but I think you can read the title and know whether you should read it. I've kind of been drifting in this direction for awhile and it seems like some really good advice for clearing your mind of mental clutter and bad There was some crazy clarity in here. It's an incredibly well-organized book and just flows in a way that gives you actual advice for making changes in your life for any areas in which you might feel like making changes. I don't think this book is relevant for everyone, obviously, but I think you can read the title and know whether you should read it. I've kind of been drifting in this direction for awhile and it seems like some really good advice for clearing your mind of mental clutter and bad habits to help you become an even better mother.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Sarich

    I enjoyed this book for its calming effect it had. It’s light and fluffy and communicates essential Buddhist teachings in an easy way that are relatable to the “ordinary” non-religious person- I wouldn’t say you need to be a mother to read it. The principles of Buddhism (according to this book) are beautiful and make sense intellectually and spiritually. Very practical advice for parents or parents to be :) just imagining a society who raises their children with such values and beliefs ✨

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristenne

    One of the most helpful books I've read about mindful parenting! The author succinctly and accurately connected the Buddhist way of life with parenting, in a way that's easy to digest even when you are not a practicing Buddhist. It really helped me transform my way of parenting my daughter and jn the way I deal with difficult emotions and difficult situations. Truly a remarkable book that I recommend to every parent. One of the most helpful books I've read about mindful parenting! The author succinctly and accurately connected the Buddhist way of life with parenting, in a way that's easy to digest even when you are not a practicing Buddhist. It really helped me transform my way of parenting my daughter and jn the way I deal with difficult emotions and difficult situations. Truly a remarkable book that I recommend to every parent.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I can appreciate many aspects of this book and it provides a wonderful set of tools for all people, not just mothers, to live a calmer and happier life. Mothers need all of the tools they can get, so I highly recommend it! I will apply many of the ideas into my relationships with my child, partner and family. I personally was not interested in majority of the last chapter of this book which is why I have rated this book a 4.

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