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Globalizing Education Policy

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Rizvi and Lingard's account of the global politics of education is thoughtful, complex and compelling. It is the first really comprehensive discussion and analysis of global trends in education policy, their effects - structural and individual - and resistance to them. In the enormous body of writing on globalisation this book stands out and will become a basic text in edu Rizvi and Lingard's account of the global politics of education is thoughtful, complex and compelling. It is the first really comprehensive discussion and analysis of global trends in education policy, their effects - structural and individual - and resistance to them. In the enormous body of writing on globalisation this book stands out and will become a basic text in education policy courses around the world. - Stephen J Ball, Karl Mannheim Professor of Sociology of Education, Institute of Education, University of London, UK In what ways have the processes of globalization reshaped the educational policy terrain? How might we analyse education policies located within this new terrain, which is at once local, national, regional and global? In Globalizing Education Policy, the authors explore the key global drivers of policy change in education, and suggest that these do not operate in the same way in all nation-states. They examine the transformative effects of globalization on the discursive terrain within which educational policies are developed and enacted, arguing that this terrain is increasingly informed by a range of neo-liberal precepts which have fundamentally changed the ways in which we think about educational governance. They also suggest that whilst in some countries these precepts are resisted, to some extent, they have nonetheless become hegemonic, and provide an overview of some critical issues in educational policy to which this hegemonic view of globalization has given rise, including: devolution and decentralization new forms of governance the balance between public and private funding of education access and equity and the education of girls curriculum particularly with respect to the teaching of English language and technology pedagogies and high stakes testing and the global trade in education. These issues are explored within the context of major shifts in global processes and ideological discourses currently being experienced, and negotiated by all countries. The book also provides an approach to education policy analysis in an age of globalization and will be of interest to those studying globalization and education policy across the social sciences.


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Rizvi and Lingard's account of the global politics of education is thoughtful, complex and compelling. It is the first really comprehensive discussion and analysis of global trends in education policy, their effects - structural and individual - and resistance to them. In the enormous body of writing on globalisation this book stands out and will become a basic text in edu Rizvi and Lingard's account of the global politics of education is thoughtful, complex and compelling. It is the first really comprehensive discussion and analysis of global trends in education policy, their effects - structural and individual - and resistance to them. In the enormous body of writing on globalisation this book stands out and will become a basic text in education policy courses around the world. - Stephen J Ball, Karl Mannheim Professor of Sociology of Education, Institute of Education, University of London, UK In what ways have the processes of globalization reshaped the educational policy terrain? How might we analyse education policies located within this new terrain, which is at once local, national, regional and global? In Globalizing Education Policy, the authors explore the key global drivers of policy change in education, and suggest that these do not operate in the same way in all nation-states. They examine the transformative effects of globalization on the discursive terrain within which educational policies are developed and enacted, arguing that this terrain is increasingly informed by a range of neo-liberal precepts which have fundamentally changed the ways in which we think about educational governance. They also suggest that whilst in some countries these precepts are resisted, to some extent, they have nonetheless become hegemonic, and provide an overview of some critical issues in educational policy to which this hegemonic view of globalization has given rise, including: devolution and decentralization new forms of governance the balance between public and private funding of education access and equity and the education of girls curriculum particularly with respect to the teaching of English language and technology pedagogies and high stakes testing and the global trade in education. These issues are explored within the context of major shifts in global processes and ideological discourses currently being experienced, and negotiated by all countries. The book also provides an approach to education policy analysis in an age of globalization and will be of interest to those studying globalization and education policy across the social sciences.

42 review for Globalizing Education Policy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Trevor (I sometimes get notified of comments)

    I’m really not going to do this one justice – it is a beautifully organised work and has so many interesting things to say about both globalisation and education. It also is an important meditation on where we are at the moment and the forces and pressures that are exerted on our societies and our education systems. I’m just going to highlight one or two of the main things that stuck out for me. Like I said, there is much more detail available in this work and as an introduction to the idea of g I’m really not going to do this one justice – it is a beautifully organised work and has so many interesting things to say about both globalisation and education. It also is an important meditation on where we are at the moment and the forces and pressures that are exerted on our societies and our education systems. I’m just going to highlight one or two of the main things that stuck out for me. Like I said, there is much more detail available in this work and as an introduction to the idea of globalisation it would be hard to find a better place to start. But let’s start with education. Increasingly, education is being presented as an economic imperative. This is one of the more obvious manifestations of the neoliberal dominance of modern thought. Why do I call it dominance? Well, the GFC of 2008 could have been something similar to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Rarely has the ‘bankruptcy’ of ideas been so literally displayed. That we are now half a decade after that time – although, like the sword of Damocles, one is never quite sure when (not if) the next crisis will happen – and none of the problems that caused that crisis have been addressed. Why? Because those who cannot be criticised, those who can barely be named, those who own the voices of our societies, have demand that no change will be countenanced. The rest of us can shout and cry and march and stamp our feet as much as we like – but no change will occur and in the end the poor will be blamed until the next and worse crisis which is coming. Neoliberalism is concerned with a certain brand of economic efficiency. Education is therefore seen as a means to economic success. But we live in changing times. We no longer have any blacksmiths, in fact, we no longer have VHS repairmen either. Change is the only absolute and it is your responsibility to ensure you remain an economically viable unit. First and foremost this means having the knowledge and skills wanted by employers to justify their continuing to feed you and your family. Education is no longer something that finishes at the end of primary school (as it did for most 60 years ago), or even secondary school (as it did for most 30 years ago). Today you need degrees and experience and everyone talks of ‘lifelong learning’. And all of this is at your expense and all of it is to ensure you don’t fall behind. Economic viability is your sole aim in life – and this will mean you will be able to go on being a consumer and thus helping to keep the wheels of industry turning. Amusingly enough, your learning will not be designed to make you question the hamster wheel you find yourself on, rather, you are to get smarter in a way that ensures you remain dumb. But it isn’t just you that needs to be a lifelong learner - the whole of society is obsessed with pedagogy. There was a time when we had education departments and these were the places that were more or less solely concerned with educating society. Today almost every branch of government is involved in education in one way or another. Got caught drink driving? – there’s a course for that – caught a disease? – read this brochure – bankrupt? – let our financial planners guide you towards economic wellbeing. We are witnessing the whole of society being turned into a place where pedagogy rules. And what does this say about our society? Well, that depends on what the purpose of education is. If you are like John Dewey you might be persuaded to think that the role of education is to provide students with the skills they will need to be able to act as citizens within an increasingly complicated world. That is, that students would leave their education as true lifelong learners – because the only way they can hope to be able to contribute meaningfully to a changing society is if they have the intellectual tools to remain informed. Naturally enough, this idea of education producing intellectually engaged citizens (rather than technically adept customers) isn’t really the preferred model endorsed by our betters. (All praise be to the supervisors) So, a lot of the education that goes on in society is more about compliance than freethinking. Education is one of the main tools of social reproduction, but it is also a powerful instrument of social change. Given this Janus like visage of education, it always remains deeply contested territory. The other thing this book is about is globalisation. We need to start with a technical term – Westphalian nation states. This is the remarkably recent idea (from the seventeenth century) that nation states are a bit like isolated buckets. There’s the stuff inside them and lots of other stuff outside them, but what goes on inside them is pretty much up to those states themselves to decide and everyone inside is contained in the bucket and so under the rules that apply to the bucket. When you feel a tear running down your cheek as you drape the Aussie flag over your shoulders on ANZAC Day with the first strains of Advance Australia Fair ringing in your ears you are living the Westphalian dream. But the world is increasingly becoming something other than a Westphalian kind of place. Like I said, nation states haven’t really been around for all that long and at the moment, as buckets, many are becoming increasingly leaky. Both money and certain classes of people are able to move across these pretend lines in the sand as if they didn’t exist. Now, notice I said some people. Israel has its Apartheid wall, the United States has anti-Mexican fences and Australia has cut its own mainland off from where people can claim asylum. Some people certainly cannot move across borders as if they did not exist. The Westphalian world still exists for some people, but for others it is completely invisible. And who are these ghost-like people able to move through otherwise impenetrable borders? They are people who have either money or skills that are in demand. And how do you get skills that are in demand? Well, one really smart way is to go to a ‘good’ university. A good university is almost invariably a university in an English speaking country – the USA primarily, but Britain, Canada and Australia as also-rans too. The flows of people go almost exclusively one way. English is the lingua franca (which surely must drive the French nuts) and so a degree from an English speaking university is seen as a way to fast track your career - and since your career is your life... Often the point of these degrees is also to seek employment and residency in the first world countries where you completed your degree. One of the figures quoted in the book is that about 30% of those with a university education in developing nations end up in first world countries. The dreaded brain-drain. But what is interesting here is that the authors don’t see this is totally negative, even for the countries experiencing the brain-drain. People who leave their countries often go on having intimate and complex relationships with these countries. And they are often better placed ‘here’ than they would be ‘there’ to provide assistance. And anyway, today’s communications technologies make where you live increasingly unimportant. Well, unless you are a refugee – and we’ve already established you don’t count. So, education is about giving you economically sellable skills and we live in an increasingly global world – so what does that mean? Well, that means we need to have an increasingly standardised curriculum internationally. We are already more or less going for this anyway. The OECD runs PISA and writes lots of reports on international education - how to improve it, what works, evidence based blah, blah. The tests have a normative effect on how nations then go about putting together their curricula and how they go about assessing learning. As Bernstein pointed out – and is quoted at length in this book – there are three message systems in education – curriculum, assessment and pedagogy. Once you have control of the first two, the third (the one that teachers generally use to establish their own sense of ‘professionalism’) becomes increasingly hard to move about it, caught as it is in a pincer movement between the other two. This book ends with a wonderful chapter looking at how to reimagine globalisation beyond the neoliberal imagining. They point out that there is really no going back to some wonderful world prior to globalisation. That wonderful world probably never existed. The question for us is how we want to go forward and how we can become more than merely customers in a world where the real game is being played at scales above the nation state, that is, above where we have citizen rights. If globalisation is going to work for more than just a few corporations then we are going to have to find ways of having a real say in that world. And not just by the very limited effects of our purchasing power, but via a real power that only come from us being engaged citizens. Unfortunately, to date we have remained racist and selfish enough for our racism and selfishness to help to keep us all in our place – still, education seems to provide the only hope we have to move beyond the prisons that those with power would like us to not notice even exist around us. Long may education remain a contested space.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Keyvan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. good

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Proctor

    I'm reading and plan to finish it during the summer break. I'm reading and plan to finish it during the summer break.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Schmitt

  5. 4 out of 5

    Aini Marina Ma'rof

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ana Cecilia

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Navas

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ammar Husnain Khan

  9. 4 out of 5

    Claire Melanie

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  11. 4 out of 5

    Middlethought

  12. 4 out of 5

    Luisa Garfagnini

  13. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

  14. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Castro

  16. 5 out of 5

    Teya Yu

  17. 5 out of 5

    Loretta Brumble

  18. 4 out of 5

    John

  19. 4 out of 5

    A. D. Hoang

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stockfish

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cristal

  22. 4 out of 5

    Annette Kemppi

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mariam

  24. 5 out of 5

    Toryn Green

  25. 5 out of 5

    mohammed almaraee

  26. 4 out of 5

    Viek

  27. 4 out of 5

    Polly Vaughan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christien

  29. 4 out of 5

    Grogan Ullah

  30. 5 out of 5

    Paula

  31. 5 out of 5

    Asmara Joy

  32. 5 out of 5

    Defenestraethe

  33. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  34. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  35. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  36. 5 out of 5

    Riku Sayuj

  37. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Denver

  38. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Jankowski

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Hose

  40. 4 out of 5

    Sajjad Imran

  41. 5 out of 5

    Laila Sajjad

  42. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

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