Hot Best Seller

It Takes a Village: And Other Lessons Children Teach Us

Availability: Ready to download

For more than twenty-five years, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton has made children her passion and her cause. Her long experience with children -- not only through her personal roles as mother, daughter, sister, and wife but also as advocate, legal expert, and public servant -- has strengthened her conviction that how children develop and what they need to succeed are in For more than twenty-five years, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton has made children her passion and her cause. Her long experience with children -- not only through her personal roles as mother, daughter, sister, and wife but also as advocate, legal expert, and public servant -- has strengthened her conviction that how children develop and what they need to succeed are inextricably entwined with the society in which they live and how well it sustains and supports its families and individuals. In other words, it takes a village to raise a child.This book chronicles her quest -- both deeply personal and, in the truest sense, public -- to discover how we can make our society into the kind of village that enables children to grow into able, caring, resilient adults. It is time, Mrs. Clinton believes, to acknowledge that we have to make some changes for our children's sake. Advances in technology and the global economy along with other developments society have brought us much good, but they have also strained the fabric of family life, leaving us and our children poorer in many ways -- physically, intellectually, emotionally, spiritually. She doesn't believe that we should, or can, turn back the clock to "the good old days." False nostalgia for "family values" is no solution. Nor is it useful to make an all-purpose bogeyman or savior of "government." But by looking honestly at the condition of our children, by understanding the wealth of new information research offers us about them, and, most important, by listening to the children themselves, we can begin a more fruitful discussion about their needs. And by sifting the past for clues to the structures that once bound us together, bylooking with an open mind at what other countries and cultures do for their children that we do not, and by identifying places where our "village" is flourishing -- in families, schools, churches, businesses, civic organizations, even in cyberspace -- we can begin to create for our children the better tomorrow they deserve.


Compare

For more than twenty-five years, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton has made children her passion and her cause. Her long experience with children -- not only through her personal roles as mother, daughter, sister, and wife but also as advocate, legal expert, and public servant -- has strengthened her conviction that how children develop and what they need to succeed are in For more than twenty-five years, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton has made children her passion and her cause. Her long experience with children -- not only through her personal roles as mother, daughter, sister, and wife but also as advocate, legal expert, and public servant -- has strengthened her conviction that how children develop and what they need to succeed are inextricably entwined with the society in which they live and how well it sustains and supports its families and individuals. In other words, it takes a village to raise a child.This book chronicles her quest -- both deeply personal and, in the truest sense, public -- to discover how we can make our society into the kind of village that enables children to grow into able, caring, resilient adults. It is time, Mrs. Clinton believes, to acknowledge that we have to make some changes for our children's sake. Advances in technology and the global economy along with other developments society have brought us much good, but they have also strained the fabric of family life, leaving us and our children poorer in many ways -- physically, intellectually, emotionally, spiritually. She doesn't believe that we should, or can, turn back the clock to "the good old days." False nostalgia for "family values" is no solution. Nor is it useful to make an all-purpose bogeyman or savior of "government." But by looking honestly at the condition of our children, by understanding the wealth of new information research offers us about them, and, most important, by listening to the children themselves, we can begin a more fruitful discussion about their needs. And by sifting the past for clues to the structures that once bound us together, bylooking with an open mind at what other countries and cultures do for their children that we do not, and by identifying places where our "village" is flourishing -- in families, schools, churches, businesses, civic organizations, even in cyberspace -- we can begin to create for our children the better tomorrow they deserve.

30 review for It Takes a Village: And Other Lessons Children Teach Us

  1. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    First of all, this is a misunderstood book. Many people falsely assume that it's about how government or society is more important than family when it comes to the upbringing of children. Instead, the central thesis is that society has a crucial role in addition to that of a family when it comes to creating a safe and nurturing environment for children. And the corollary: that governments and policies should be judged by the impact that they have on our children. Clinton includes a number of stati First of all, this is a misunderstood book. Many people falsely assume that it's about how government or society is more important than family when it comes to the upbringing of children. Instead, the central thesis is that society has a crucial role in addition to that of a family when it comes to creating a safe and nurturing environment for children. And the corollary: that governments and policies should be judged by the impact that they have on our children. Clinton includes a number of statistics to support her claims, as well as anecdotal information about programs and policies around the world as well as in communities in the US. Unfortunately, all of this information is now two decades out of date, and therefore of questionable value in today's political debates. Regardless of how you feel about Hillary Clinton, personally or politically, this is a fascinating and provocative book. And if you're not sure how to feel about Hillary, it does contain some insight as to her character and values (conservatives might be surprised on the emphasis she places on faith, family, and work ethic), and on her progressive positions on issues including health care, education, and gun control.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Have to say, I am an unabashed Hillary fan. But that said, I was a bit disappointed that this 10th anniversary edition of her groundbreaking book was not updated for 2007 audiences. The data and statistics are all woefully out of date (early nineties), and therefore do not provide any sort of meaningful trend analysis. Also, in a post September 11th world, I would have liked to hear Sen. Clinton's perspectives on raising children in a climate of terrorism, xenophobia and war. Overall, I would ha Have to say, I am an unabashed Hillary fan. But that said, I was a bit disappointed that this 10th anniversary edition of her groundbreaking book was not updated for 2007 audiences. The data and statistics are all woefully out of date (early nineties), and therefore do not provide any sort of meaningful trend analysis. Also, in a post September 11th world, I would have liked to hear Sen. Clinton's perspectives on raising children in a climate of terrorism, xenophobia and war. Overall, I would have thought that she could have hired an intern or assistant to do the extra research to bring this book into the millenium, and was surprised that she did not. However, Clinton's book is remarkable as it provides an overview of the types of policy analysis that needs to occur in order to build a better quality of life for the next generation. It also serves as a reminder that America, under Clinton/Gore, was on the verge of accomplishing so much more... Its absolutely pathetic that the issues she raises remain unaddressed by the current administration. Okay. 'nuff of my diatribe.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I couldn't even finish it--and that was before the whole Daddy Clinton with a Cigar in the White House fiasco. Yes, children are priceless, brilliant, beautiful treasures, but it really only takes two involved, self-respecting, loving parents to raise a child. The problem our children have in our country is that many parents are too damn lazy and expect other people--teachers, school counselors, day care centers, nannies, etc.--to raise their kids, and to teach them discipline and morals. Surpri I couldn't even finish it--and that was before the whole Daddy Clinton with a Cigar in the White House fiasco. Yes, children are priceless, brilliant, beautiful treasures, but it really only takes two involved, self-respecting, loving parents to raise a child. The problem our children have in our country is that many parents are too damn lazy and expect other people--teachers, school counselors, day care centers, nannies, etc.--to raise their kids, and to teach them discipline and morals. Surprise! That doesn't work. Kids need their parents, not a village or Big Government.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Hillary Rodham Clinton wrote this book with her heart in the right place. I believe that she does have a lot of compassion for children. That being said, there were times that I had great difficulty reading her book about the well being of children, knowing that she was a war hawk in the US’s illegal invasion of Iraq in 2003. On page 290 of her book, Clinton states that it is the responsibility of the government to “Keep America the world’s strongest force of peace, freedom, and prosperity.” Her Hillary Rodham Clinton wrote this book with her heart in the right place. I believe that she does have a lot of compassion for children. That being said, there were times that I had great difficulty reading her book about the well being of children, knowing that she was a war hawk in the US’s illegal invasion of Iraq in 2003. On page 290 of her book, Clinton states that it is the responsibility of the government to “Keep America the world’s strongest force of peace, freedom, and prosperity.” Her vote for war did nothing to embrace these ideals. War does not effect any person more than it effects a child. Of the vast problems that children in the United States face, their problems pale in comparison to the challenges that many Iraqi children are dealing with. On a more positive note - what I did like about this book is that for every problem Clinton mentions, she offers a solution – either an idea of how it can be improved, or by giving a real world example of what other communities are doing to tackle or eliminate problems. These ideas come from small rural communities and big cities. She also uses examples of what other countries are doing to help their own children. Many of these programs, Clinton witnessed for herself, seeing firsthand, the important work that certain agencies are conducting. Clinton’s book also provides an overview of the types of policy changes that needs to occur in this country in order to build a better quality of life for children. It Takes A Village to Raise a Child, was well written, well researched and I gained a lot of insight on some very important social programs. Regardless of some of my personal feelings about Hillary Rodham Clinton, I did enjoy her book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Loved this book. It reminds me of a time when people cared about other people and really put themselves in the place of the other before making decisions. We were a less selfish nation then.I really believe the "village principle". Loved this book. It reminds me of a time when people cared about other people and really put themselves in the place of the other before making decisions. We were a less selfish nation then.I really believe the "village principle".

  6. 5 out of 5

    Song Medina-Babijes

    I came across Hillary Clinton’s book 2 years ago at a book sale and was intrigued by the title of the book. Thinking it was a sort of autobiography, I learned that the title was derived from an old African saying, “it takes a village to raise a child”. The old adage simply means that a child is not only raised by his parents alone but is also “raised” by other important actors in the community such as friends, school, and village elders—figures that contribute to the total well-being of a child. I came across Hillary Clinton’s book 2 years ago at a book sale and was intrigued by the title of the book. Thinking it was a sort of autobiography, I learned that the title was derived from an old African saying, “it takes a village to raise a child”. The old adage simply means that a child is not only raised by his parents alone but is also “raised” by other important actors in the community such as friends, school, and village elders—figures that contribute to the total well-being of a child. Sharing her personal experiences as a mother and as a public figure, Hillary explains how modern society has become far removed from the childhood she once enjoyed, why our society has become bereft of morality and good values and why she pushing families to go back to the basics of traditional family values and community involvement.

  7. 5 out of 5

    SC

    Although I admire Hill's dedication to children's issues, I found this book rather lacking. The prose is exceedingly dull, perhaps because she hired a ghostwriter as she did not have time to write the book herself. (This I can understand, as she was a trailblazing First Lady of the United States, traipsing the globe in advocacy of women and children.) The subsequent lack of passion (which is more visible in her oratory) is therefore painfully conspicuous. Although I admire Hill's dedication to children's issues, I found this book rather lacking. The prose is exceedingly dull, perhaps because she hired a ghostwriter as she did not have time to write the book herself. (This I can understand, as she was a trailblazing First Lady of the United States, traipsing the globe in advocacy of women and children.) The subsequent lack of passion (which is more visible in her oratory) is therefore painfully conspicuous.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I love the way Hillary writes. She is great at writing on a level that it feels she is really talking directly to the reader. I felt that this book gave a great sense of how we should be in our own country towards our children. It takes more than a mom and a dad to raise a well rounded child. It takes many others and it seems there are some areas of our country that lack these values.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cippi

    Inspiring, worth-reading. I vote Hillary for next US President

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    Annoying and preachy. It may take a village to raise a child, but that village shouldn't be the government. Annoying and preachy. It may take a village to raise a child, but that village shouldn't be the government.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    Considering I spent years in the Conservative community, where people who never read this book joked about & condemned it without having read it, I had never bothered to read it in the 90s. It's been on my "to read" pile a couple of years now, and I decided if there was ever a time to read it, that time has come. Regardless how one feels about Hillary's ambition or political tactics, this book is worthy of being judged on its own merit. It has plenty of wisdom to offer for every time and place in Considering I spent years in the Conservative community, where people who never read this book joked about & condemned it without having read it, I had never bothered to read it in the 90s. It's been on my "to read" pile a couple of years now, and I decided if there was ever a time to read it, that time has come. Regardless how one feels about Hillary's ambition or political tactics, this book is worthy of being judged on its own merit. It has plenty of wisdom to offer for every time and place in human society. At it's simplest, this is a peasantly nostalgic read, exploring the general sense of safety most Caucasian, middle class families felt in the 50s and 60s. Penny candy, walking to the park to until the street lights came on, the values instilled in church, the strong sense of community, and so much more. Though for African American families, the challenges were harder, I have long heard those who grew up or raised a family during that time reminisce about the pleasures of walking to the corner store, playing outside without fear of impending danger, and how family, friends and neighbors all kept a watchful eye on everyone's kids, intervening as needed, affirming & mentoring, and telling your Mama if your escapades were of a dangerous or ill intentioned nature. Hillary addresses, within the context of her pleasant or fearful memories, how different our society is today: how long work hours increase family instability and undermine marriages, the importance of monogamy in creating a safe environment in which to nurture a child, and how when families fall apart, the undergirding of our entire society is torn asunder. She speaks of our sense of alienation, fear of strangers, and inability to feel safe anywhere, limits our involvement in community, community service, and ability to raise raise children to be free, run and play, or even go to the corner store without a sense of forboding. She reminds of things we took for granted, such as good schools, public pools & playgrounds, safe streets, neighborhood policemen who knew your family and was mentor, a protector and a friend. Libraries were free, most school supplies were provided, we had recess twice a day, participated in public performances, created art & explored many types of physical activities to increase our health and fitness. She explores how extremist political policies have robbed us of most of these ingredients of creating cultured people, fostering compassion, patriotism and developing skills to express ourselves as needed to be active participants in our careers & the national dialog. By condemning the safeguards & opportunities that made these things possible, by calling it "government interferance" and "communism", we have allowed private business to take over these privileges and have ceded our American inheritance to corporations who monopolize our resources and hold them for ransom at unaffordable prices. Though "Mayberry" was never a complete reality, its spirit did exist in communities who fostered its sustaining values for many generations. In the name of "free market," we've sold our birthright as Americans to preserve community rooted in our shared strengths, wisdom & contributions. We now sacrifice our mutually owned public amenities to private control, for profit. Public libraries, school systems and public utilites are becoming increasingly owned or controlled by private interests. Guardians and transmitters of classic literature, art, history nd the 3 RS have become purveyors of pop culture, mythological versions of history, and expensive tutoring with the sole intention of gaining profit, whether or not they successfully perform or deliver the promised goods and services. The Hillary who wrote this book in no way resembles the person the conservative right presents as a murderer and a dictator who will ruin our lives.This Hillary is a person of commitment, humility and a desire to serve. I'm taking my time with this book, so I have no idea when I will finish it. I'm sipping it like a fresh cup of coffee. It's a pleasure to read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Yoo-Yoo

    This book was written in 1996, during Bill Clinton's first term, and the title stuck with me until now, when I finally looked it up at my library and sat down to read it. I am glad I checked it out. It reminded me of many truths and considerations I knew growing up, but have forgotten in the day-to-day pettiness of life. It made me feel more grounded. There are many things we teach children about what is good and stable and how to be ready to deal with society and the outside world. I had forgot This book was written in 1996, during Bill Clinton's first term, and the title stuck with me until now, when I finally looked it up at my library and sat down to read it. I am glad I checked it out. It reminded me of many truths and considerations I knew growing up, but have forgotten in the day-to-day pettiness of life. It made me feel more grounded. There are many things we teach children about what is good and stable and how to be ready to deal with society and the outside world. I had forgotten too many of these lessons over the years in my fast-paced, tech-centric life, and a refresher as well as a glimpse at the larger issues was very helpful. Mrs. Clinton has an authoritative, self-aware, and motherly narrator voice, guiding you through the book. As implied by the extended title "It Takes a Village, and Other Lessons Children Teach Us", this book is focused on children. Children's physical, emotional and intellectual development, children's safety, children's health, children's exposure to media, the effect of poverty and violence on children. Mrs. Clinton has many example stories, pretty much every other page, about how different government policies (for example, free school lunches) have affected specific children in the U.S. and around the world in different ways, as well as stories of raising Chelsea and stories of her own childhood. In many ways, this is somewhat of a history book as well. It captures the U.S. in 1996 very well. At that time, violence in video games, Joe Camel marketing cigarettes to children, and charter schools were new issues. The internet was a new technology, people used landlines as their main telephones, and income inequality in the U.S. wasn't nearly as bad as it is now, but was noticeably increasing. It also has snippets of Mrs. Clinton's childhood, showing the U.S. as it was in the 1950s. She covers how life, work, and child-rearing was changed by many different forces leading up to the 90s. People worried about different things then. It's sad to realize most schools still don't have the educational programs she described almost twenty years ago. This book did take a while to read, as it can be a bit pedantic at times. There is much talk of values. By two-thirds of the way through, you get the general gist -- we could be doing a lot more for our children as a village. We need to be more responsible. We need to support programs that may cost extra money but will produce a great return because they are investments in our children. To some extent, she lays out an image of ideal parents, something none of us could really achieve. It's also a very American bent, of course, emphasizing the self-esteem and optimism that does help one succeed in American culture. I didn't buy all her arguments, but the majority of them made sense. I kept wanting to put the book down and go do something to help children already! I ended up volunteering to read books to disadvantaged preschoolers. So the book will have a longer lasting impact...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Lemaster

    Wow! This book mad eme feel so separate from Hillary. I originally loved the idea of a woman in office based on Hillary's strong persona. Unfortunately, after reading this book, I really felt the difference in our class backgrounds. I felt that being women wasn't enough of a bond. To be honest, I was quite bored by her book. It was repetitive, and felt only like politics as usual. This book made me feel very disconnected from Hillary Clinton. Barack Obama's book, The Dreams of My Father had the Wow! This book mad eme feel so separate from Hillary. I originally loved the idea of a woman in office based on Hillary's strong persona. Unfortunately, after reading this book, I really felt the difference in our class backgrounds. I felt that being women wasn't enough of a bond. To be honest, I was quite bored by her book. It was repetitive, and felt only like politics as usual. This book made me feel very disconnected from Hillary Clinton. Barack Obama's book, The Dreams of My Father had the opposite effect. Obama's book- much better read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Debolina Raja

    An amazing book about how the whole universe conspires to create the right ambience for a child to grow up in. Hilary Rodham Clinton uses examples from real everyday life to tell us how each one of us is responsible towards the proper growth and development of our little ones into good and mature human beings. Life is an experience, and it takes the whole village and community to make this life fulfilling and learning for our little ones. A must-read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Keren Threlfall

    It is politically convenient to ignore perspectives from politicians (or people in general) with whom we assume to disagree with. In politics, I think there is an even greater belief that if we disagree (particularly, strongly) with someone, they must be deficient in all other areas, as well. But it is not always socially expedient to practice such an existence, and when considering how we can best work together to foster human flourishing as much as is possible, we would be remiss to ignore the It is politically convenient to ignore perspectives from politicians (or people in general) with whom we assume to disagree with. In politics, I think there is an even greater belief that if we disagree (particularly, strongly) with someone, they must be deficient in all other areas, as well. But it is not always socially expedient to practice such an existence, and when considering how we can best work together to foster human flourishing as much as is possible, we would be remiss to ignore the core, important message of Hillary Clinton's "It Takes a Village." The premise of Clinton's books is that it requires a community effort to raise a well-rounded child fit to eventually become part of and give back to the community at large. As Clinton indicates, no family truly lives in a vacuum. Implementation of Clinton's perspectives may vary across political parties, but implementation is not the primary point of this book. At times Clinton waxes political, but overall the book read like a rather conservative view of the importance of family life in the United States. (And at times, it is dreadfully boring and repetitive.) Growing up, I often heard "I don't want a village raising my kids," or "it does not take a village to raise a child." Ironically, those voices decrying this were coming from...my village. I think I heard this primarily because they opposed Clinton. Without understanding what she was suggesting by this statement, the easiest option was simply to criticize this view of community and family as a whole. Another Goodreads review puts it this way: "The problem our children have in our country is that many parents are too damn lazy and expect other people--teachers, school counselors, day care centers, nannies, etc.--to raise their kids, and to teach them discipline and morals. Surprise! That doesn't work. Kids need their parents, not a village or Big Government!" This is the sentiment toward "it takes a village" that I observed in my community. And yet, it was within the context of a village: my private Christian school and the church community, where I heard this voiced most often. So, entering parenthood myself, I still maintained this sentiment; perhaps even in more isolation than the community in which I was immersed as a child. When my physical, local village essentially disappeared from our lives overnight (we were asked to leave our church after raising questions), I did not immediately see how much I needed external community support as I raised my own children. Now, as I have studied family life across cultures, I see role of "it takes a village," to be at the core in cultures and families who repeatedly produce healthy family life, generation after generation. Continuing down the theme of sociology, I see each country to have it's own sense of "national personality," which gets reflected into so much of how we live and function together as a society, even when external markings (development, technology, etc...) may remain the same. I tend to see America's personality as the one of a rugged individualist, a personality once necessary as an immigrant nation, pioneering into difficult new territory, rebelling against a sovereign nation (England), and to surviving much of her harsh beginnings. But as we enter into our adolescence as a nation, perhaps we can consider a more well-rounded, mature perspective. (And, this is the personality reflected in the Goodreads review I excerpted above.) Clearly at this point in the review, this is a digression from Hillary's book at large, and a discussion on the importance of understanding a need for a healthy family life that transcends the focus on solely a nuclear family. Last year, a friend sent me an On Being podcast that intersected on thoughts regarding the nuclear family: http://www.onbeing.org/program/transc...). One aspect that was discussed was the way that the nuclear family has become so lonely; whereas in times past and in other cultures, the family "would have been embedded in networks of other marriages and other families and elders and cross-generational." Today, we don't see that (for many reasons, and some are a true advantage), and it is very unnatural, considering the way it seems family life was designed to exist. (The podcast dialogue goes on to discuss that while some lament the single parent, they similarly lament the nuclear family existing as an island. They highlight the weight that is placed on parents who must raise children on their own, which results in eventual, successive breakdown of many families and marriages.) Even having recently finished the book, "More than Happy," an examination of family life within the Amish culture, I was once again reminded of the importance of "the village" in a child's growth and development. (Keep in mind that I say this as a homeschooler; I also believe that even when parents take on a child's education and development in ways that are atypical to the surrounding society, village and outside involvement are still crucial. When "a village" is done in a healthy way, there is much reinforcement of the lessons parents are trying to teach at home, the sense of safety and security in the world beyond the home, and a relief of pressure on the parents having to "do it all." (Which, by sending me to church and private school, my parents and many others in our community implemented, regardless of how it was labeled at that time. It is a village I am thankful for and that has an impact on my life even today; I just wish it would have been recognized as such in my life and amongst the individuals who comprised it.) I would recommend this book to people who may have been averse to Clinton's views on this matter in the past, as it may help give a more thorough understanding of what she was actually promoting. (This does not portray any of my current political stances on either of the Clintons. :)) I would also recommend this as a resource to anyone interested in learning about various cultural expressions of family life.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Robyn Bray

    Originally posted my review on an incomplete, forgotten account. Forgive my repost. Considering I spent years in the Conservative community, where people who never read this book joked about & condemned it without having read it, I had never bothered to read it in the 90s. It's been on my "to read" pile a couple of years now, and I decided if there was ever a time to read it, that time has come. Regardless how one feels about Hillary's ambition or political tactics, this book is worthy of being ju Originally posted my review on an incomplete, forgotten account. Forgive my repost. Considering I spent years in the Conservative community, where people who never read this book joked about & condemned it without having read it, I had never bothered to read it in the 90s. It's been on my "to read" pile a couple of years now, and I decided if there was ever a time to read it, that time has come. Regardless how one feels about Hillary's ambition or political tactics, this book is worthy of being judged on its own merit. It has plenty of wisdom to offer for every time and place in human society. At it's simplest, this is a peasantly nostalgic read, exploring the general sense of safety most Caucasian, middle class families felt in the 50s and 60s. Penny candy, walking to the park to until the street lights came on, the values instilled in church, the strong sense of community, and so much more. Though for African American families, the challenges were harder, I have long heard those who grew up or raised a family during that time reminisce about the pleasures of walking to the corner store, playing outside without fear of impending danger, and how family, friends and neighbors all kept a watchful eye on everyone's kids, intervening as needed, affirming & mentoring, and telling your Mama if your escapades were of a dangerous or ill intentioned nature. Hillary addresses, within the context of her pleasant or fearful memories, how different our society is today: how long work hours increase family instability and undermine marriages, the importance of monogamy in creating a safe environment in which to nurture a child, and how when families fall apart, the undergirding of our entire society is torn asunder. She speaks of our sense of alienation, fear of strangers, and inability to feel safe anywhere, limits our involvement in community, community service, and ability to raise raise children to be free, run and play, or even go to the corner store without a sense of forboding. She reminds of things we took for granted, such as good schools, public pools & playgrounds, safe streets, neighborhood policemen who knew your family and was mentor, a protector and a friend. Libraries were free, most school supplies were provided, we had recess twice a day, participated in public performances, created art & explored many types of physical activities to increase our health and fitness. She explores how extremist political policies have robbed us of most of these ingredients of creating cultured people, fostering compassion, patriotism and developing skills to express ourselves as needed to be active participants in our careers & the national dialog. By condemning the safeguards & opportunities that made these things possible, by calling it "government interferance" and "communism", we have allowed private business to take over these privileges and have ceded our American inheritance to corporations who monopolize our resources and hold them for ransom at unaffordable prices. Though "Mayberry" was never a complete reality, its spirit did exist in communities who fostered its sustaining values for many generations. In the name of "free market," we've sold our birthright as Americans to preserve community rooted in our shared strengths, wisdom & contributions. We now sacrifice our mutually owned public amenities to private control, for profit. Public libraries, school systems and public utilites are becoming increasingly owned or controlled by private interests. Guardians and transmitters of classic literature, art, history nd the 3 RS have become purveyors of pop culture, mythological versions of history, and expensive tutoring with the sole intention of gaining profit, whether or not they successfully perform or deliver the promised goods and services. The Hillary who wrote this book in no way resembles the person the conservative right presents as a murderer and a dictator who will ruin our lives.This Hillary is a person of commitment, humility and a desire to serve. I took my time with this book, sipping it like a fresh cup of coffee. It's a pleasure to read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paola Hernandez

    Full Disclosure: I love Hillary Clinton, so I'm a bit biased. Having said that. This book even though it was written in the 90's seems so relevant today. The importance of having a good support system to raise a child an issue that by all measures she has always been passionate about resonated with me. She touches so many subjects from health care, to education, empathy, work ethic and spiritual growth. Even though I do not have children of my own, I know that as a member of my community I am als Full Disclosure: I love Hillary Clinton, so I'm a bit biased. Having said that. This book even though it was written in the 90's seems so relevant today. The importance of having a good support system to raise a child an issue that by all measures she has always been passionate about resonated with me. She touches so many subjects from health care, to education, empathy, work ethic and spiritual growth. Even though I do not have children of my own, I know that as a member of my community I am also responsible for our children's well being and that I too can contribute to their future.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anne Boardman

    During this political season, I decided I needed to know more about Hillary, the person. I have to say I see eye-to-eye with her on child raising, the importance of tending to the entire village and a number of really important issues. I also got to understand Hillary's personality and influences and I am feeling really good about her. This book is very thought-provoking and compels you to act on behalf of the village. And I am so glad I read it. During this political season, I decided I needed to know more about Hillary, the person. I have to say I see eye-to-eye with her on child raising, the importance of tending to the entire village and a number of really important issues. I also got to understand Hillary's personality and influences and I am feeling really good about her. This book is very thought-provoking and compels you to act on behalf of the village. And I am so glad I read it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    While it was nice to read about Hillary's continued dedication to improving the lives of children, the book feels dated. Many of the views outlined in this book were once mainstream values of the Democratic party, but in 2017 come off as Republican-lite. Most of the data in the book is outdated and reads as a very long campaign speech. While it was nice to read about Hillary's continued dedication to improving the lives of children, the book feels dated. Many of the views outlined in this book were once mainstream values of the Democratic party, but in 2017 come off as Republican-lite. Most of the data in the book is outdated and reads as a very long campaign speech.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    when you work, work hard. when you play, play hard. and don't confuse the two. -Mr. Rodham "you can't roll up your sleeves and get to work if you're still wringing your hands." .. the sight of baby carriages left unattended outside stores on the streets of copenhagen said more to me about the safety of danish babies than any research. there is not one civilization, from the oldest to the newest, from which we cannot learn. -- Eleanor Roosevelt when parents talk to their babies, they are feeding the when you work, work hard. when you play, play hard. and don't confuse the two. -Mr. Rodham "you can't roll up your sleeves and get to work if you're still wringing your hands." .. the sight of baby carriages left unattended outside stores on the streets of copenhagen said more to me about the safety of danish babies than any research. there is not one civilization, from the oldest to the newest, from which we cannot learn. -- Eleanor Roosevelt when parents talk to their babies, they are feeding the brain cells that process sound and helping create connections necessary for language development.. by the age of two, children whose mothers had talked to them frequently since infancy had larger vocabularies than children from the same socioeconomic background whose mothers bad been less talkative. by the time most children begin preschool, the architecture of the brain has essentially been constructed. Daniel Goleman's EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE about our two forms of intellect: rational and emotional must balance each other out. all of western europe provides home health visits for new mothers/babies 1992 USA is 24th in infant mortality rates. 23 countries, Japan #1, do a better job. 17 countries, Italy #1, have better maternal health. University of Minnesota study reveals violence in children bc lack of secure attachment. Mormons set aside one night per week for family activities. Clinton's did the same- and each week they rotated choosing an activity. whether children are swept away in the undertow of confusion or reach maturity safely depends on how strongly and creatively we affirm our faith in their promise. margaret mead says exposure to religion in childhood is important because prayer and wonder are not so easy to learn in adulthood. she was also concerned that adults who lacked spiritual models in childhood might be vulnerable as adults to the appeals of intolerant or unduly rigid belief. the long living delaney sisters (HAVING OUR SAY) are prime examples of what researchers are discovering about the positive role an affirmative outlook in life can lay in physical health. certainly it lowers our levels of anger and hostility, freeing up energy for more constructive purposes. philosopher nelson goodman suggests that we would do well to ask HOW rather than WHETHER someone is smart. the question would shift emphasis to helping individuals realize their potential in the first place. the main point i want to make here is that virtually all children can learn and develop more than their parents, teachers, or the rest of the village often believe. times have changed- people used to tell you what your child did around the neighborhood, now they are afraid it will be taken as criticism of parenting skills.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Irene

    When this book was first published in 1996, I was in college and not at all interested in parenting or politics. Now, 20 years later, I'm all about parenting and politics! In the introduction, Hillary Clinton makes clear that "parents are the most important influences on the lives of their children." (p. XII) However, since "no family exists in a vacuum" (p. XII), the well-being of all children also depends on the society in which they live. The "village", of course, is a metaphor for not just th When this book was first published in 1996, I was in college and not at all interested in parenting or politics. Now, 20 years later, I'm all about parenting and politics! In the introduction, Hillary Clinton makes clear that "parents are the most important influences on the lives of their children." (p. XII) However, since "no family exists in a vacuum" (p. XII), the well-being of all children also depends on the society in which they live. The "village", of course, is a metaphor for not just the neighbors and teachers and police officers in a community, but also the institutions like government, churches, schools, and medical facilities that all play a crucial role in every child's development. In matters of public policy, the bottom line should always be, "Is it good for our children?" (p. XVI) Like her public persona, Clinton's writing style is not especially engaging, however, this book is dotted with personal anecdotes that I found relatable. It was especially fun to read about Hillary as a young mother, and Chelsea as a child. While certainly not a "parenting book", I would readily recommend this book to first-time pregnant women and new parents. In discussions that reference studies and experts (many of which are further explained in the "Notes" section), Clinton explores what's best for children. Along the way, she provides not just information, but insights and suggestions that I think any new parent would find helpful. Ultimately, the book is about public policy. For each issue discussed in this book, Clinton talks about her own experiences, lays out the conclusions of what studies show, and then describes existing programs that successfully address the issue at hand. A couple programs might be implemented at the national level, but for the most part, a lot of them are state-funded or church-run or even founded by community coalitions. The point is, people are already finding ways to fix problems, and we need those fixes to be prevalent in all areas where they are needed. The book covers a wide range of issues including support for new mothers, vaccinations, nutrition, public safety, gun control, adolescent drug use, race, education, child care, and public service - and that's not even an exhaustive list! It even talks about faith and building good character. Clinton looks at every issue from the perspective of, "What is best for children, and how can we make that happen for all children?" Even as a staunch supporter of Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, I do not agree with every position she took in this book. But her intentions are clear, and I have to respect that her motivation comes from a good place. Every issue from the environment to the global economy can be boiled down to whether or not a particular policy benefits children and/or the world in which children live.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I’ve always felt conflicted about Hillary. There are times I see her as a woman with a family who has faced struggles in her life that are not all that different from myself. Then there are moments when I think she is a stone cold harridan who manipulates the system in order to gain as much power as possible. As I read this book, however, I was solidly on her side. Who wouldn’t be (well, besides Ann Coulture)? Putting children first, promoting early education programs and daycare assistance, hel I’ve always felt conflicted about Hillary. There are times I see her as a woman with a family who has faced struggles in her life that are not all that different from myself. Then there are moments when I think she is a stone cold harridan who manipulates the system in order to gain as much power as possible. As I read this book, however, I was solidly on her side. Who wouldn’t be (well, besides Ann Coulture)? Putting children first, promoting early education programs and daycare assistance, help for single mothers... They all seem like great ideas to me. The problem? As of June 2011, it seems like 300+ pages of outdated wishful thinking. Reading post-9/11 was difficult because with every bill she mentioned, with every legislation that was referenced, all I could think about was how different the world is today. I’d be extremely interested to know what Mrs. Clinton’s thoughts are today in a post-September 11th world in which our country is still struggling to recover in many ways, teachers are being laid off in record numbers, and the budget deficit is so high I have to stop to count the zeroes when I look at the number. Furthermore, with Hillary having experienced the inner workings of politics as a senator, a potential presidential candidate and now as Secretary of State, I’m also curious as to if and how this book would be different. I absolutely, 100% agree with Hillary on certain things: First, that raising our children is first and foremost the responsibility of parents. Second, that the community is a major player in the development of our children and it’s our responsibility to contribute in some positive way. And third, parenting is hard. It is by far the greatest challenge of our lives. All. the. time. I constantly second guess myself and look for outside opinions, I read parenting blogs and magazine articles to get different perspectives on things. 90% of my thought processes are spent worrying about my child and if I’m doing the right thing by her. Such is the life of a parent. Especially in modern society. Bottom line - I should’ve read this book ten years ago. And I wish Hillary would work on a new edition (in her spare time) with more specific ideas that are applicable in today’s very different world.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vincent Novak

    Although this book was published 14 years ago, and the generation of children (of which I was a part of circa 1996) Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks of, is now in early adulthood, the book's thesis that not only must society make accomodations for its children, but the parents of said children also, is still very relevant in 2010. I grew up in a small town not unlike the ideal "village" portrayed by Mrs. Clinton. I was raised by a single divorcee mom was very conservative in her parenting methods. Although this book was published 14 years ago, and the generation of children (of which I was a part of circa 1996) Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks of, is now in early adulthood, the book's thesis that not only must society make accomodations for its children, but the parents of said children also, is still very relevant in 2010. I grew up in a small town not unlike the ideal "village" portrayed by Mrs. Clinton. I was raised by a single divorcee mom was very conservative in her parenting methods. I was close to many members of my family, church, and larger community. I can honestly say it benefitted me. Only when I moved to a more urban area did I realize how rare such an upbringing is these days. Unfortunately, the social issues which were discussed as plagueing parenting have only worsened since the publication of the book, such as the lack of family time spent together and the increasing dependency on technology as a substitute for parental supervision. This coincides with the moving of Generations X and, increasingly, Y into parenting. While I strongly agree with Mrs. Clinton's positions, I must make the concession that the book has failed in its ambitious purpose.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    I began reading (listening to) this fully expecting to scoff and roll my eyes, and say, "THIS is why no one likes Hilary." While I don't believe Hilary is the devil that conservatives characterize her as, I've not been her biggest fan. But I loved this book and found myself nodding and saying, "Yep," to much of what she said. In fact, there were times I got so lost in what she was saying that I forgot I was listening to Hilary and not a talk from General Conference. I'd probably have given this I began reading (listening to) this fully expecting to scoff and roll my eyes, and say, "THIS is why no one likes Hilary." While I don't believe Hilary is the devil that conservatives characterize her as, I've not been her biggest fan. But I loved this book and found myself nodding and saying, "Yep," to much of what she said. In fact, there were times I got so lost in what she was saying that I forgot I was listening to Hilary and not a talk from General Conference. I'd probably have given this five stars if I weren't so skeptical of politicians in general. In a day when political machines are so image-conscious and savvy, I can't help but wonder whether I'm getting a figure's honest thoughts or the well crafted message of a think tank. The fact that I agreed with pretty much everything she said here makes me wary, because I pretty much never find a politician I agree with. Are Hilary and I BFFs? Or am I the gullible recipient of a targeted message?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Mackintosh

    I enjoyed this read; however I couldn't give it more stars because as I read I realized that there was a pattern that started to annoy me. Basically Clinton outlined truths and reminisces about her experiences and those are truly delightful bits. Then she outlines legislation and solutions for various issues. I think the book would be more interesting if she had addressed issues that she wanted to change or show the ways that other counties and leaders had made innovative, successful changes, bu I enjoyed this read; however I couldn't give it more stars because as I read I realized that there was a pattern that started to annoy me. Basically Clinton outlined truths and reminisces about her experiences and those are truly delightful bits. Then she outlines legislation and solutions for various issues. I think the book would be more interesting if she had addressed issues that she wanted to change or show the ways that other counties and leaders had made innovative, successful changes, but this is really a shine to Clinton administration legislation and of course twenty years of hindsight makes failures like the goals 2000 act laughable and sad.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Sun

    I listened to the abridged audiobook. Most surprising anecdote: She and Bill had Arkansas prison inmates on staff in the governor's mansion, which had been longstanding state policy. She got to know all kinds of convicted criminals, including murderers. The last part of the audiobook is about income inequality and the degradations of consumer capitalism. All in all, with the frequent subtweeting of politicians who talk a big talk about family values except when family-friendly Democratic policies I listened to the abridged audiobook. Most surprising anecdote: She and Bill had Arkansas prison inmates on staff in the governor's mansion, which had been longstanding state policy. She got to know all kinds of convicted criminals, including murderers. The last part of the audiobook is about income inequality and the degradations of consumer capitalism. All in all, with the frequent subtweeting of politicians who talk a big talk about family values except when family-friendly Democratic policies are on the agenda, this seems very well played.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    I liked it but my friends didn't so much. However, it's a good book club pick. Our book club quote-of-the-year came from this book - "It just goes to show that a bad book doesn't make for a bad book club meeting." I liked it but my friends didn't so much. However, it's a good book club pick. Our book club quote-of-the-year came from this book - "It just goes to show that a bad book doesn't make for a bad book club meeting."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gayle

    Interesting discussion of public policy, developmental and educational psychology. Nothing much new, though. I was disappointed because I'd hoped to get a better insight into Hillary, the person. Interesting discussion of public policy, developmental and educational psychology. Nothing much new, though. I was disappointed because I'd hoped to get a better insight into Hillary, the person.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Justin Tapp

    Hillary Clinton is the Last Conservative. Take a look at these quotes and tell me who of the many candidates for President in 2016 wrote them: "There are limits to what (government) can do. We reject the utopian view that government can or should protect people from the consequences of personal decisions or that it can legislate complete peace, harmony, and brotherhood." "Those of us who believe in the free market system should worry about what we are in danger of becoming: a throwaway society sust Hillary Clinton is the Last Conservative. Take a look at these quotes and tell me who of the many candidates for President in 2016 wrote them: "There are limits to what (government) can do. We reject the utopian view that government can or should protect people from the consequences of personal decisions or that it can legislate complete peace, harmony, and brotherhood." "Those of us who believe in the free market system should worry about what we are in danger of becoming: a throwaway society sustained on a diet of unrealizable fantasies, a society in which people—especially children—define self-worth in terms of what they have today and can buy tomorrow." "(E)very society requires a critical mass of families that fit the traditional ideal, both to meet the needs of most children and to serve as a model for other adults who are raising children in difficult settings." "(P)rayer allows us to let go of our children and to let them find their own ways, with faith to guide and sustain them against the cruelties and indifference of the world. 'Of all the needs…a lonely child has, the one that must be satisfied, if there is going to be a hope of wholeness, is the unshaking need for an unshakable God.' Amen." "In our (family) bedtime reading and prayer ritual (we) read children’s versions of Bible stories." "I strongly favor promoting choice among public schools...I also support letting public schools determine how they can best be managed, including allowing them to contract out services to private firms. The idea is that they should be freed from regulations that stifle... Cutting the red tape and regulations has freed teachers to work together." "Students may participate in individual or group prayer during the school day...Schools that generally open their facilities to extracurricular student groups should also make them available to student religious organizations on the same terms. Students should be free to express their beliefs about religion in school assignments and their work should be judged by ordinary academic standards of substance and relevance." "It is realistic, not racist, to be cautious when walking through a high-crime neighborhood, or to want to avoid a corner where a drive-by shooting has taken place. Such judgments become biased only when they are motivated by negative stereotypes rather than common sense. Loving oneself is not a matter of narcissism or egocentrism; it means respecting yourself and feeling affirmed in your identity." "Children are born with the capacity for faith, hope, and love, and with a deep intuition into God’s creative, intelligent, and unifying force. The inclination toward spirituality does not need to be planted in children, but it does need to be nurtured and encouraged to bloom. Our spiritual life as a family was spirited and constant. We talked with God, walked with God, ate, studied, and argued with God. Each night, we knelt by our beds to pray before we went to sleep. We said grace at dinner, thanking God for all the blessings bestowed. God was always present to us, a much-esteemed, much-addressed member of the family. If more parents introduced their children to faith and prayer at home, whether or not they participated in organized religious activity, I am sure there would be fewer calls for prayer in schools." "Religion is not just about one’s relationship with God, but about what values flow out of that relationship, how we follow them in our daily lives and especially in our treatment of our neighbors next door and all over the world. Preaching is a distant second to practicing when it comes to instilling values like compassion, courage, faith, fellowship, forgiveness, love, peace, hope, wisdom, prayer, and humility." "The instability of American households poses great risks to the healthy development of children...while many adults claim to have benefited from divorce and single parenthood, most children have not...A parent’s remarriage often does not seem to better the odds, the rise in divorce and out-of-wedlock births has contributed heavily to the tragic increase in the number of American children in poverty, currently one in five...My strong feelings about divorce and its effects on children have caused me to bite my tongue more than a few times during my own marriage and to think instead about what I could do to be a better (spouse)...The disappearance of fathers from children’s daily lives, because of out-of-wedlock births and divorce, has other, less tangible consequences. Girls are more likely to respond with depression and inhibited behavior, whereas boys are more likely to drop out of school and to have academic or behavioral problems." "(L)ike many parents, I feel there is much to worry about when it comes to raising children in America today.Everywhere we look, children are under assault: from violence and neglect, from the breakup of families, from the temptations of alcohol, tobacco, sex, and drug abuse, from greed, materialism, and spiritual emptiness." "Some experts also suggest that the loosening of sexual mores and the pervasive use of sex in advertising, including the exploitation of children in grown-up ads, have combined to sabotage the fundamental taboo against incest." "I don’t believe (adolescents) are ready for sex or its potential consequences—parenthood, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases—and I think we need to do everything in our power to discourage sexual activity and encourage abstinence. Young people can learn to value the intimacy of friendships with the opposite sex as well as their own, can enjoy being in groups as well as couples." "As a lawyer, I handled my share of divorce cases and tried my hardest to keep the parties out of court by working to help them solve their disagreements.I am ambivalent about no-fault divorce with no waiting period when children are involved. We should consider returning to mandatory 'cooling off' periods, with education and counseling for partners...I admire the way the Parent Education Program in Columbus, Ohio, treats divorce as a public health issue." "At the core of this book is...my conviction that parents are the most important influences on the lives of their children...Parents bear the first and primary responsibility for their sons and daughters—to feed them, to sing them to sleep, to teach them to ride and daily decisions that determine whom they have the potential to become." "But our ability to address these and other challenges is imperiled by a federal debt that has grown by $3 trillion in the last five years, placing a birth tax of $28,000 on the tiny shoulders of each child born today." "I do not pretend to know how to nurture and protect every American child so that each one fully reaches his or her God-given potential." "Heartening efforts are under way to help more couples preserve their marriages. Grassroots campaigns that urge men to take more responsibility for family well-being are cropping up around the country. Promise Keepers, a nondenominational ministry, has filled football stadiums with men seeking guidance and encouragement." "My brothers and I went faithfully to Sunday school and were usually back at church at least once more during the week for youth group meetings, athletic competitions, potluck suppers, or play rehearsals. Sunday school teachers taught us that prejudice was wrong in the sight of God and explained that the reason God made so many different kinds of people was to enjoy their diverse beauties and gifts, like a garden’s various fruits and flowers. Those simple but powerful lessons were reinforced by our youth minister..." "Casual attitudes toward marijuana and minors’ access to cigarettes raise the likelihood that teenagers will make a sad progression from cigarettes to marijuana to more serious drug use and earlier sexual activity...Those who regularly attend religious services, however, use drugs less frequently than teens who attend rarely or never." "(We) try to sit down to at least one meal a day together, usually dinner. After grace, which we take turns saying, there is no better time to catch up on what we have been doing all day, what we are excited about, and what troubles us...I admire the way Mormons set aside one night a week for family activities." "I had never thought of gratitude as a habit or discipline before, and I discovered that it was immensely helpful to do so. When I found myself in a difficult situation, I began to make a mental list of all that I was grateful for—being alive and healthy for another day, loving and being loved by family and friends, experiencing the awesome privilege of working on behalf of my country and its citizens." --- I can imagine a lot of liberals scratching their head over voting for a prayer-loving, church-going, divorce-hating school choice advocate who emphasizes traditional family values over government intervention. Someone who preaches the ills of television and marijuana as gateways to sex and loose morals for children while praising Promise Keepers. I can imagine a lot of #NeverTrump voters pondering whether John Kasich wrote the above, or saying "Yes, this sounds more like someone I can vote for." This is/was Hillary. It is hard for a free-market Christian conservative like myself to imagine someone stating the above being elected to the Presidency after today (2016) without great anger from the Left. This is why I can write that Hillary is the Last Conservative. This is what you get if you don't read books by people you're voting on. Hillary writes about what she is most passionate about, children and health care: "Each of us plays a part in every child’s life: It takes a village to raise a child...The village can no longer be defined as a place on a map, or a list of people or organizations, but its essence remains the same: it is the network of values and relationships that support and affect our lives...Our challenge is to arrive at a consensus of values...I’m often asked what I would like to see happen above all else in our country and in our world. There are so many things to pray for, so many things to work for. But certainly my answer would be a world in which all children are loved and cared for—first by the families into which they are born, and then by all of us who are linked to them and to one another." The 2006 edition of the 1996 book features an afterword as it was re-released in anticipation of her 2008 campaign. She points out some of the policies she advocated for as First Lady eventually became law: 1997's SCHIP, which provides expanded Medicaid insurance to children, is still a vital piece of health care in every state, and gets renewed every time its statute of limitations runs out. The Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 made it easier to adopt foster children, boosting foster adoptions 64 percent nationwide. "We could set a goal of reducing our foster care and adoption rolls by 100,000 children each year for the next five years by moving children either back home or into adoptive families, whichever is in their best interests." "I worked with Senator Chafee and Democratic Senator Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia on the Foster Care Independence Act of 1999, which provides young people aging out of foster care with support services, including access to health care, educational opportunities, job training, housing assistance, and counseling." (Highlighting the above on her CV alone would have helped her with Christian conservatives in 2016, but I don't remember her mentioning these in debates.) The book isn't all conservative, Hillary makes a mild argument for her beliefs on government intervention, particularly in the areas of health care and children's welfare. As America has progressed, she writes, so has the expectations about what government is supposed to do and the social safety net that society demands. By improving the well-being of children, we pay homage to the Pilgrims who came before us. "Are the children sustained by government-subsidized day care or fed by government-supported school breakfasts and lunches a 'threat to our economic freedom' or guilty of 'waste, fraud, and abuse'? Do programs to immunize or educate them 'sap their initiative'?" She advocates for wage equality and paid medical leave time for parents, highlighting companies that offer generous benefits as models for legislation. She rails against "for-profit" health care and demands that insurance companies not discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions, a centerpiece of something later dubbed "Obamacare." She cites examples of insurance companies kicking women out of hospitals shortly after birth, leading to bad consequences and knee-jerk legislation. She rails against Charles Murray's The Bell Curve and rejects writing off any member of society as either unteachable or irredeemable, including the prisoners working at the Arkansas' Governor's Mansion the family "became very friendly" with. She advocates helping people's emotional intelligence and praies education reform that incorporates empathy and character-based education. She criticizes those who advocate cutting state's Medicaid programs, pointing out the importance of early detection, prevention, and education of young pregnant women that Medicaid can help with, using travels to Indonesia and Africa as her examples. "When I visited the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research in Bangladesh, funded in part with American aid, I met a doctor from Louisiana who was there to learn about low-cost techniques he could use back home to treat some of his state’s more than 240,000 uninsured children." She advocates a health reform like that of England where doctors and nurses make house calls during the early weeks. She cites examples of uneducated women in Arkansas who do not realize the importance of talking to their babies, and others who call the ER when they need help for basic questions. "Can you imagine a hot line in every community? Local hospitals could pool their resources to sponsor one. Many hours of anxiety and millions of dollars in costs could be avoided if mothers and fathers had someone to call to talk through a baby’s problem instead of showing up at the (emergency room)." On crime, she advocates for getting assault weapons off the street, adding police officers, and pushing community policing. The former two were now-controversial centerpieces of her husband's crime bills. But, overall, she encourages stronger family values and adult male role models as a hopeful solution to the growing problems of childhood development. In that sense, she sounds a bit like a Candidate Obama many years later, including some of his pragmatism: "(W)e must be careful to avoid demonizing those who disagree with us, or acting as if we have a monopoly on truth." This amusing anecdote in response to a Clinton education program: "One teacher told me that a local church had protested when she moved the chairs in her classroom into a circle for discussion purposes, citing the insidious influence of Goals 2000 because 'everyone knows that’s how witches’ covens meet.' The incident would be laughable except that her principal ordered her to put the chairs back in their neat rows." Ah, whatever happened to Goals 2000? By the year 2000: 2. The high school graduation rate will increase to at least 90 percent. 4. United States students will be first in the world in science and mathematics achievement. While I know what became of some of Clinton's policy proposals, I do not know what has become of the moral and spiritual principles she espouses in this book. While she gave hints of It Takes a Village in her campaign, the constant nods toward abortion rights -- something absent from this book-- and a rejection of any talk of a "critical mass" of "traditional families" setting an "example" for the rest of the country suggest she's made a profound shift. I finished this book just before the third debate with Trump, in which I felt she was given an opening to reach out to centrist undecideds who were grasping for something, anything by which they might still vote for her by touting her history of advocating for easier adoptions and health care for children. Instead, she spoke of making certain the Supreme Court would uphold abortion rights forever. That was unfortunate. Many Christian conservatives benefit from S-CHIP and insurance for their children's pre-existing conditions without knowing her long history in it. Perhaps she takes that knowledge for granted. There was one moment on the 2016 campaign trail where she talked about going to a multi-racial church and felt truly moved by the unity she saw there. That was deep in the primary and didn't seem to help her against Bernie Sanders. If she had resurrected that in the general campaign, it may have connected Hillary 2016 to Hillary 1996 pretty well. Instead, 1996 seems an awfully long away away from 2016. I give this book 2 stars out of 5 "It was okay." I recommend reading it as HRC is likely our next President. I have read all of her other books, and several biographies about her, and you should too.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Arwen

    3.5

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...