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Theory for Education: Adapted from Theory for Religious Studies, by William E. Deal and Timothy K. Beal

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Theory for Education provides a concise and clear introduction to key contemporary theorists, including their lives, major works and ideas. Written for the student in need of a quick introduction or for the scholar brushing up on details, this new volume in the theory4 series presents major thinkers whose work and ideas have shaped critical thinking in our time. Greg Dimit Theory for Education provides a concise and clear introduction to key contemporary theorists, including their lives, major works and ideas. Written for the student in need of a quick introduction or for the scholar brushing up on details, this new volume in the theory4 series presents major thinkers whose work and ideas have shaped critical thinking in our time. Greg Dimitriadis and George Kamberelis underscore the particular relevance of these thinkers for the field of education - their work on education, how others in education have used them and possible future directions for teachers and researchers. Theory for Education's ease of use, clarity and comprehensive scope will be invaluable for those entering the field. Adapted from Theory for Religious Studies, by William E. Deal and Timothy K. Beal.


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Theory for Education provides a concise and clear introduction to key contemporary theorists, including their lives, major works and ideas. Written for the student in need of a quick introduction or for the scholar brushing up on details, this new volume in the theory4 series presents major thinkers whose work and ideas have shaped critical thinking in our time. Greg Dimit Theory for Education provides a concise and clear introduction to key contemporary theorists, including their lives, major works and ideas. Written for the student in need of a quick introduction or for the scholar brushing up on details, this new volume in the theory4 series presents major thinkers whose work and ideas have shaped critical thinking in our time. Greg Dimitriadis and George Kamberelis underscore the particular relevance of these thinkers for the field of education - their work on education, how others in education have used them and possible future directions for teachers and researchers. Theory for Education's ease of use, clarity and comprehensive scope will be invaluable for those entering the field. Adapted from Theory for Religious Studies, by William E. Deal and Timothy K. Beal.

41 review for Theory for Education: Adapted from Theory for Religious Studies, by William E. Deal and Timothy K. Beal

  1. 4 out of 5

    Trevor (I sometimes get notified of comments)

    There were things that annoyed me about his book and things I really liked. One of the things that annoyed me was the alphabetical ordering of the theorists. Look, I know, chronological is so passé, but it does have its advantages. I should have spent more time looking at the contents page, but I didn’t and so I spent most of the book wondering why Gramsci came after Foucault and things like that. This is a book made up of three to four page thumbnails devoted to each theorists – and really, unl There were things that annoyed me about his book and things I really liked. One of the things that annoyed me was the alphabetical ordering of the theorists. Look, I know, chronological is so passé, but it does have its advantages. I should have spent more time looking at the contents page, but I didn’t and so I spent most of the book wondering why Gramsci came after Foucault and things like that. This is a book made up of three to four page thumbnails devoted to each theorists – and really, unless you know the theorists you probably aren’t going to get too much out of the thumbnails. It does odd things too – like mentioning Freire’s banking model of education under Freire, but not really explaining it until we get to bell hooks. The problem I had with this was that if I was struggling to understand the explanations of some of the theorists I know quite well, what chance was there I would understand the theorists I didn’t know at all? And this proved to be the case, particularly with Jacques Lacan – who I can fairly confidently say, “What in the name of Jesus...?” The book starts with four key ‘predecessor’ theorists – Dewey, Freud, Marx and Saussure. I’ve some experience with all of these guys, so found this part of the book fairly easy going, although, I've read least of Freud. Lacan is in the tradition of Freud and is French – so the chances of my understanding him were probably going to be fairly limited to start with anyway. With many of the theorists it is a bit of a struggle to see how one could apply their ideas either in the classroom or in research about the classroom. Other questions raised by various, particularly post-Marxist theorists, such as, how do you teach working class people within what is essentially a middle class educational system without alienating them from those around them are ideas and concerns I have grappled with most of my life. Having said that the theorists I would like to read more of are Deleuze and Guattari - even if it seems their writings sound absurdly difficult. Their idea of ‘rhizones’ (which I’m taking to mean something like a neural network) as an alternative to ‘arboreal’ structures (hierarchies based on tree diagrams) is fascinatingly interesting. Essentially, it recommends a world where power structures didn’t exist as standard tree-like diagrams, but rather as networks linked by relationships - the node with the most connections wins. Leadership would then mean richness of interconnections, rather than a static notion of placement within a hierarchy based on an arbitrary decision of ‘higher and lower’. I really liked this idea – in fact, it started me thinking about how such a system might be used as a way to organise society, or at least, power structures within society. Initially I thought such an organisation would probably be impossible and never work – but then, given how alienating our current power structures are maybe anything would be better. We can hardly be deliriously happy with how well our current power structures are working. At first I was surprised Piaget didn’t rate a mention – of course, he does, it is just that P comes quite late in this alphabet (he is 19th out of 23) and so there was a long, long wait before we get to what I think is one of the key disputes in education theory and some ideas that are potently rich in potential for the classroom – that between Piaget and Vygotsky (who, naturally enough, comes second last in the book). I've discussed Vygosky's work elsewhere here on good reads. Their dispute is over whether development leads learning or vice versa. Vygotsky, I think, wins this argument by saying learning precedes development, an opinion and position of remarkable importance for education, particularly of students from culturally diverse backgrounds and mixed abilities. I found the liberation education theorists and the structuralism of Saussure and Foucault the most interesting ideas in the book – Foucault crossing both areas. I even gained a higher regard for Derrida after reading the section on him. As I’ve said earlier, I found the Freudian and Neo-Freudian theorists the least interesting. Which then just leaves what has been left out of this collection altogether. There was no discussion of Behaviourism at all. I found this particularly odd – especially since Skinner was a reaction against eugenic models of educational ability and Piaget was a counter-reaction against Skinner. I think eugenics has had a rebirth - it is just that we don't like to mention it. Today, it has become very trendy to dismiss Skinner out of hand, but I think this is unfair while also giving a distorted picture of the history of our struggle to create coherent theories of education. His role, even as merely the eternal opposite in an ongoing polemic (and I think he is much more important than just that) surely rates a mention, and more than just as asides re: other theorists. Given the constraints of space imposed and the general purpose of this text – to provide an introduction to key educational theorists of the last 150 years – this book has done quite well. The discussion of Dewey was particularly rich – discussing both his philosophical Instrumentalism and his ideas around inquiry based learning as a means to build citizens capable of participating in a democracy. When this book is good, it is very good.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brent Wilson

    Great collection of abstracts of different social/cultural critics. For a person not formally trained in this area, it's a valuable starting-point reference for their ideas. However, difficult to read and process thoroughly, since this isn't a beginner's tutorial. You'd have to look elsewhere for extended examples or clear connections to practice. Reads more like a Wikipedia precis than a deeper narrative into the theorist's thinking. Great collection of abstracts of different social/cultural critics. For a person not formally trained in this area, it's a valuable starting-point reference for their ideas. However, difficult to read and process thoroughly, since this isn't a beginner's tutorial. You'd have to look elsewhere for extended examples or clear connections to practice. Reads more like a Wikipedia precis than a deeper narrative into the theorist's thinking.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I got a lot out of this book. A great reference and introduction to theorists who've made a mark on the field of education. I especially liked the bibliographies accompanying each section. I got a lot out of this book. A great reference and introduction to theorists who've made a mark on the field of education. I especially liked the bibliographies accompanying each section.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    An amazing foundation for a grad student in the field of education.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vince

  7. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tina

  9. 5 out of 5

    alana

  10. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Evans

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rambling Reader

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mallory

  14. 5 out of 5

    John

  15. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  17. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Murphy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tonya

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

  20. 4 out of 5

    Frank

  21. 4 out of 5

    Missk90

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Birss

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lori S

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sheri Lehn

  25. 5 out of 5

    Beacon Hill Training

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lavendergina

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ciara Salazar

  28. 4 out of 5

    Toryn Green

  29. 4 out of 5

    Keith Coverdale

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nurshafieyah

  31. 5 out of 5

    Shary Dacuyan

  32. 4 out of 5

    Rosa

  33. 4 out of 5

    Shoto Tkhelidze

  34. 5 out of 5

    Latasha Nevchuk

  35. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  36. 5 out of 5

    Erichmarthin

  37. 5 out of 5

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  38. 5 out of 5

    Roberto Joseph

  39. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  40. 5 out of 5

    Adam Garcia

  41. 4 out of 5

    Narji Saikia

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