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Ukrainian Non-Fiction Writers: Ukrainian Chess Writers, Ukrainian Literary Critics, David Bronstein, Ivan Franko, Efim Geller

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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 29. Chapters: Ukrainian chess writers, Ukrainian literary critics, David Bronstein, Ivan Franko, Efim Geller, Alexander Konstantinopolsky, George Shevelov, Fedir Bohatyrchuk, Nikolay Dyatlenko, Liudmyla Skyrda, Isaac Boleslavsky, Mikhail Gu Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 29. Chapters: Ukrainian chess writers, Ukrainian literary critics, David Bronstein, Ivan Franko, Efim Geller, Alexander Konstantinopolsky, George Shevelov, Fedir Bohatyrchuk, Nikolay Dyatlenko, Liudmyla Skyrda, Isaac Boleslavsky, Mikhail Gurevich, Viktor Grabovskyj, Eduard Gufeld, Dmytro Dontsov, Serhiy Yefremov, Oksana Zabuzhko, Mark Taimanov, Valentyn Rechmedin, Vereslav Eingorn, Mikhail Golubev, Viktor Petrov, Solemea Pavlychko, Filaret Kolessa, Yuly Aykhenvald, Ivan Drach, Miko aj Siwicki, Vladimir Grabinsky, Andrei Volokitin, Orest Somov. Excerpt: David Ionovich Bronstein (; February 19, 1924 - December 5, 2006) was a Soviet chess grandmaster, who narrowly missed becoming World Chess Champion in 1951. Bronstein was described by his peers as a creative genius and master of tactics. He was also a renowned chess writer. David Bronstein was born in Bila Tserkva, Ukraine, to a Jewish mother and father. Growing up, he learned chess at age six from his grandfather. As a youth in Kiev, he was trained by the renowned International Master Alexander Konstantinopolsky. He finished second in the Kiev Championship when he was only 15, and achieved the Soviet Master title at age 16 for his second-place result in the 1940 Ukrainian Chess Championship, behind Isaac Boleslavsky, with whom he became close friends both on and off the chessboard. He would later go on to marry Boleslavsky's daughter, Tatiana, in 1984. After completing high school, his plans to study mathematics at Kiev University were interrupted by the spread of World War II throughout eastern Europe in the early 1940s. Shortly after the war's conclusion, he began attending Leningrad Polytechnical Institute where he studied for approximately one year. Judged unfit for military service, Bronstein spent the war performing various jobs; this included doing...


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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 29. Chapters: Ukrainian chess writers, Ukrainian literary critics, David Bronstein, Ivan Franko, Efim Geller, Alexander Konstantinopolsky, George Shevelov, Fedir Bohatyrchuk, Nikolay Dyatlenko, Liudmyla Skyrda, Isaac Boleslavsky, Mikhail Gu Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 29. Chapters: Ukrainian chess writers, Ukrainian literary critics, David Bronstein, Ivan Franko, Efim Geller, Alexander Konstantinopolsky, George Shevelov, Fedir Bohatyrchuk, Nikolay Dyatlenko, Liudmyla Skyrda, Isaac Boleslavsky, Mikhail Gurevich, Viktor Grabovskyj, Eduard Gufeld, Dmytro Dontsov, Serhiy Yefremov, Oksana Zabuzhko, Mark Taimanov, Valentyn Rechmedin, Vereslav Eingorn, Mikhail Golubev, Viktor Petrov, Solemea Pavlychko, Filaret Kolessa, Yuly Aykhenvald, Ivan Drach, Miko aj Siwicki, Vladimir Grabinsky, Andrei Volokitin, Orest Somov. Excerpt: David Ionovich Bronstein (; February 19, 1924 - December 5, 2006) was a Soviet chess grandmaster, who narrowly missed becoming World Chess Champion in 1951. Bronstein was described by his peers as a creative genius and master of tactics. He was also a renowned chess writer. David Bronstein was born in Bila Tserkva, Ukraine, to a Jewish mother and father. Growing up, he learned chess at age six from his grandfather. As a youth in Kiev, he was trained by the renowned International Master Alexander Konstantinopolsky. He finished second in the Kiev Championship when he was only 15, and achieved the Soviet Master title at age 16 for his second-place result in the 1940 Ukrainian Chess Championship, behind Isaac Boleslavsky, with whom he became close friends both on and off the chessboard. He would later go on to marry Boleslavsky's daughter, Tatiana, in 1984. After completing high school, his plans to study mathematics at Kiev University were interrupted by the spread of World War II throughout eastern Europe in the early 1940s. Shortly after the war's conclusion, he began attending Leningrad Polytechnical Institute where he studied for approximately one year. Judged unfit for military service, Bronstein spent the war performing various jobs; this included doing...

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